Short Clip Captures Audio (Allegedly) Of The Next Shelby GT500 Mustang: Video

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Before you start salivating all over your nice, clean shirt, you should know that the audio quality in the above video clip is kind of spotty. We’ve played it back numerous times and still can’t quite decide whether the spied Mustang – allegedly a prototype of the next Shelby GT500 – sounds more Coyote, or Voodoo.

We’re leaning toward the latter.

The car was spotted driving along on public roads in Dearborn, Michigan recently, giving the folks at website Mustang6G a chance to nab a quick video. Despite an awful lot of buffeting, we do at least get to hear a bit of the Shelby GT500 prototype’s exhaust note, plus a gear change or two.

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The latest rumors maintain that the forthcoming Shelby GT500 Mustang will be powered by a supercharged version of the GT350’s 5.2-liter, flat-plane-crank Voodoo V8, with a top-spec “KR” (“King of the Road”) model packing a twin-turbocharged version of the same motor. With nothing to go on beyond the rumors, the audio of the above video, and a quick cellphone pic of the view underhood taken last month, we’re taking a wait-and-see approach.

Check out the video from Mustang6G, and be sure to share your thoughts/theories in the comments section below.

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Written by Aaron Brzozowski

Aaron Brzozowski is a writer and motoring enthusiast from Detroit with an affinity for '80s German steel. He is not active on the Twitter these days, but you may send him a courier pigeon.

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