Ford Recalls 2015 F-650, F-750 Trucks Over Potential Loss Of Steering Control

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Ford Motor Company is recalling its Heavy Trucks – the F-650 and F-750 – over an issue with the steer axles that could result in a loss of steering control.

The defect: the castellated nut on the steer axles may not be properly torqued, allowing the tie rod to loosen.

The hazards: if the tie rod loosens, it may disconnect from the steering knuckle, causing a loss of steering control at lower speed and increasing the risk of a crash.

Affected vehicles:

  • 2015 Ford F-650 equipped with certain Spicer D-Series and E-Series steer axles
  • 2016 Ford F-750 equipped with certain Spicer D-Series and E-Series steer axles

Number of vehicles affected: 77 (United States figure).

The fix: Ford will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the torque of the castellated nut and tie rod, tightening it as necessary, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin November 20th, 2017.

Owners should: Ford owners who wish to know if their Ford Heavy Truck is included in this Ford F-650 and F-750 recall can visit http://owner.ford.com and click on Safety Recalls at the bottom of the page. There, they can enter their Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to see any open safety, compliance or emissions recalls, as well as customer satisfaction programs.

Owners may also contact Ford customer service or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) using the information below.

Contacts:

  • Ford Customer Service: 1-866-436-7332
  • Ford Recall Number: 17S30
  • NHTSA Campaign Number: 17V594000
  • NHTSA Toll Free: 1-888-327-4236
  • NHTSA (TTY): 1-800-424-9153
  • NHTSA Website: www.safecar.gov

News:

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Written by Alex Luft

Ford Authority founder with a passion for global automotive business strategy.

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