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Ford 7.3-Liter V8 Pounds Out Best in Class Power And Torque

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One of the big mysteries about the Ford 7.3-liter V8 engine that was announced for the 2020 Super Duty trucks was how much power it would make. Ford has now gone official with the horsepower and torque ratings, and both have grabbed best-in-class gas V8 honors. The Ford 7.3-liter V8 makes 430 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque.

The Ford 7.3-liter V8 engine will be paired with the all-new 10-speed heavy-duty TorqShift transmission on Super Duty trucks. The transmission is designed for robust power, long-term durability, and ease of service, says Ford. The engine and transmission combo are good for both work and play.

Ford is making the 7.3-liter V8 an option on the 2020 F-Series Super Duty pickup. The new Ford V8 will be fitted as standard on the F-550, F-600, F-650, and F-750 medium-duty trucks. The 7.3-liter V8 will also be standard on the E-Series, F-53, and F-59 stripped chassis trucks.

The Ford 7.3-liter V8 makes its peak 430 horsepower at 5,500 rpm and produces its best-in-class torque of 475 foot-pounds at 4,000 rpm. Ford notes that not only was the new V8 made for power and torque; it was also designed for working in harsh environments, including ease of maintenance and lower operating costs.

The new V8 will land first in the Super Duty F-250 and F-350 pickups as an addition to the base 6.2-liter engine. Ford notes that additional power and capability numbers will be offered along with towing capacity later this year. The big 7.3-liter V8 uses a variable-displacement oil pump, extra-large main bearings, forged steel crankshaft, and piston cooling jets to manage temps under load. While most trucks with the 7.3-liter V8 will use the new 10-speed HD transmission, the F-650 and F-750 will retain the 6-speed automatic.

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Shane is a car guy with a fondness for Mustangs and off-roading.

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Comments

  1. mark smyth

    This torque rating is at least 15 to 25 pounds feet less than it should be for the size of the engine. Not only that, the max torque comes in at 4,000 RPM. That is crazy. Trucks need max torque at the RPM they drive every day. The Ford 5.4 had a long stroke of 4.2 inches and a small bore to give max torque at just 3,600 RPM. Even the V10 had a max torque at just 2,500 RPM in some model years and others at just 2,800 RPM. In a pickup truck, with a 10 speed automatic, the engine will never get over 3,000 in a normal driving situation. Ford should offer about 15 HP less to get more torque with a milder cam. This way, they could have about 490 to 495 lbs feet of max torque, below 3,000 RPM which will give better MPG too. These engineers obviously have never driven a commercial truck for a living. GM is bringing out a larger version of the 6.6 liter 2020 gas engine for the Medium Duty Silverado and International partners larger trucks. It will beat the Ford 7.3 in torque.

    Reply
  2. MARK SMYTH

    BELOW IS A COPY OF ONE PARAGRAPH FROM THE FORD AUGIST 1, 2019 PRESS RELEASE RE THE LOWER POWER 7.3 AS USED IN F450,F550, F600, F650 AND F750 TRUCKS. THIS LOWER POWER VERSION IS NOT OFFERED IN THE F250 AND F350 TRUCKS.
    A dyno-certified version of the 7.3-liter V8 producing 350 horsepower at 3,900 rpm and 468 lb.-ft. of torque at 3,900 rpm will be standard on F-450 chassis cab, F-550, the new F-600, F-650 and F-750 Medium Duty trucks, and F-53 and F-59 stripped chassis models. The upgraded E-Series will also feature the 7.3-liter V8. An optional calibration intended to help customers reduce their fuel consumption will also be offered; more information will be made available at a later date.
    IN MY OPINION, THE MAX TORQUE COMES IN AT A MUCH TOO HIGH RPM POINT, IT SHOULD BE CLOSER TO 2,500 TO 2,800 MAX. A MUCH MILDER CAM WITH LESS HP AND MORE TORQUE WILL DO THE TRICK FOR ANY WORK TRUCK.

    Reply
  3. SEAN HAYES

    The 7.3L V8 makes over 400 lbft from 1500rpm and up. The torque curve is amazing. Getting the max torque at 4000rpm does not matter with that torque curve.

    Reply
  4. trailhiker

    These engines look to be built to last 30 years or more. Great job Ford!

    Reply
  5. MARK SMYTH

    SEAN. As a former heavy truck driving cross border, our Class 8 Hino trucks with a ig 6 cylinder diesel and torque in the mid 500 pounds ffet range and a manual trans, going over the small mountains east of NYC, the truck will slow down so i had to shift from 6th overdrive down to 4th or even 3rd gear, with just 5,000 pounds of freight on the truck. Slowing down from 68 or 70 MPH to 50 MPH because i was going up a very long hill, means that it cost me time, because i did not have enough torque to keep my speed at the limit to go over these long, rolling hills.. Commercial truck drivers DO NOT HAVE TIME to waste, because the U.S. federal government limits the number of hours that a driver can work in one day. back then it was 11 hours max, and in Canada it was 14 hours. Many times i was over hours, driving back to Toronto from Boston, NYC area or NJ. Twice i got tickets from the NY Sate troopers for $400 each, for working too many hours in one day. The police and government weigh station inspectors, are allowed to look at your log books for the 15 previous days and my tickets were both for work in did in the previous week. So your ignorant statement that 4,000 RPM is low enough, is based not on the real world. Diesel engines, that is the mid power one like in the biggest engine Hino, had an redline of 2,800 RPM. The new design GM big block ( 2009 ) of 8.0 liters ( never put into a production truck ) had 518 pounds feet of torque at just 1,800 RPM and max HP at just 2,800 RPM. The 8.0 liter replaced the 8.1 liter engine and was designed with full water jackets so it can run cool on propane. All the R&D develop work and testing of the new design big block, was done by Michigan based Thomson Automotive, which is no longer operating under that name. If the engine was run on E15 or even E85, the power would be at least 5 percent higher torque than regular gasoline, based on data of newer GM engines ( the 4.3 L, the 5.3 L and the 6.0 L truck engines ) run on E85.

    Reply
  6. Andrew Sommers

    I want to know why it can’t be had in a F150? Afterall in the early 70’s you could get 460’s in them all the time and I am sure that is what 7.3 litres equals.

    Reply

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