mobile-menu-icon
Ford Authority

Ford Super Duty Truck Owners Complain About Death Wobble: Video

Last summer, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Ford that alleged the automaker’s Super Duty truck has defective suspension components and steering linkage systems that led to a phenomenon called “death wobble.” Death wobble occurs when seemingly out of nowhere, the front end of the truck begins to vibrate, and the steering wheel vibrates heavily in the hands of the driver. It’s worth noting that death wobble isn’t limited to Ford vehicles alone, in the Jeep Wrangler world, death wobble is often associated with improperly executed lifts. A new video has turned up from a news station called Action 9 that shows the dreaded death wobble in action.

A man called Jason Kincaid says he was driving down the interstate when his Ford F-250 Super Duty truck suddenly started shaking violently. Kincaid says that he was able to pull over safely and went online after making it home to investigate the issue. He says that he found multiple accounts from people that called the phenomenon “death wobble.” Another man called Justin Hill has also experienced death wobble, noting that you don’t expect to spend “40 to 50 grand” to have deal with that sort of issue.

Hill did say he was aware of the potential class-action lawsuit covering 2005 through 2019 F-250 and F-350 trucks. The lawsuit we mentioned before notes that there have been 12 reports that relate accidents and injury to the phenomena. More than 1200 people have filed complaints with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration related to the issue. One driver who has experienced death wobble says that it was the “worst” violent shaking that they’ve ever felt in a vehicle and that they thought all four tires had exploded.

Hill and Kincaid hope that Ford issues a recall to fix the problem. Hill says that the vehicle isn’t safe to drive and shouldn’t be on the road. Kincaid says that the issue should be addressed “across the board nationally.” Ford has offered no comment on the issue at this time.

Subscribe to Ford Authority for more F-250 news and around-the-clock Ford news coverage.

Source: Action 9

Shane is a car guy with a fondness for Mustangs and off-roading.

Subscribe to Ford Authority

For around-the-clock Ford news coverage

We'll send you one email per day with the latest Ford updates. It's totally free.

Comments

  1. EUGENE MATTHIJETZ

    Saw this article yesterday, had a call from our head service guy for trucks out in the field with this very complaint on his truck plus one more from one of our field mechanics, doing a little research and found a tsb from Ford with a replacement steering shock to cure this problem. Surprised to not see any mention of this tsb in this article. TSB was published or updated on 12-20 2019 to TSB number 19-2392. We probably have 100 or so trucks that fall within the dates that this TSB covers.

    Reply
  2. Bry Sib

    Had death wobble with a 2014 F-350 diesel 4×4 crew cab long bed. The dealer wanted to fully disassemble the front end. I said no. Brought it to a trusted tire shop that rebalanced the tires. Problem solved.

    Reply
  3. FPVfan

    To be perfectly honest, anything bigger than a 1500-series pickup (Ford F150, Silverado/Sierra 1500, Ram 1500, Tundra & Titan) should be limited to construction companies and fleets that require the use of heavy duty equipment. A 375hp 3.5L Ecoboost has a Conventional tow rating of 13,200lbs, more than enough to tow your average boat and trailer. A 30ft Camper has a dry weight of about 5200lbs on average, adding 1500lbs loaded which is still under the limit. That right there kills the need for anything larger than an F150 because 99% of people who own a truck will rarely use a quarter of what the truck is capable of. It also goes to show that V8 engines are completely unnecessary as well. This is true for both Gasoline and Diesel engines. Ford has proven that it’s ecoboost V6 engines can easily out power most of it’s V8 engines and it’s 3.0L Powerstroke out torques the 5.0L V8.
    If Ford was any kind of smart, besides emptying the road of Monster trucks, Ford would end it’s gasoline and diesel V8 programs altogether and focus on 4cyl, 5cyl, and 6cyl Ecoboost and diesel engines. Nothing else is really needed when you think about how good Ford’s ecoboost lineup really is. For Example, the 3.0L Ecoboost V6 makes 400hp/415tq in the Explorer ST, the 2011-2012 Mustang GT made 412hp/390lb-ft of torque which was only a few short years ago. The 2.3L Turbo easily out performs the 3V 4.6L GT with 350hp/350tq compared to the anemic 300hp/320tq in the 05-09 Mustang GT. The Current Ford GT 3.5L ecoboost makes 660hp/550tq, where the 2014 GT500 only made 2hp more with the 5.8L Trinity V8 although the supercharged beast made 631lb-ft of torque. Even the Aussie Barra Inline-6 Turbo engines made good power with the 310T pushing out 415hp/416tq and the Barra 325T pushing out 436hp and 425tq (numbers that out perform even the second gen Coyote 5.0’s 435hp/400tq. It would also get rid of every other car/SUV platform besides the CD6 platform (the one the 2020 Explorer currently rides on as will the upcoming mustang). Ford needs to not only have the Mustang and Explorer on this platform but also a new global Ford Falcon performance sedan to join the mix. next would be to improve the Ranger/Bronco T6 platform and add a global Everest SUV to this lineup and get rid of vehicles like the Escape, the Ecosport and the Edge. After that, upgrade the F150/Expedition platform for more strength, bringing it closer to what an F250 can do but on a smaller, much more manageable platform that doesn’t take up the entire road and sit way too high so its not obtrusive to the view of the rest of the drivers on the road and offer better stability than a pointlessly oversized vehicle. Ford also needs to add in three more electric vehicles, two of them on the same platform that the Mach E is on which would bring out the Ford EVOS and a revised Ford C-Max and one on the F150 platform named the Ford Atlas along with making all of the Transit Vehicles electric and giving every electric vehicle some autonomous features. Lastly, Ford needs to scrape off the dead weight of Lincoln and just offer the European luxury Vignale package on certain vehicles.

    Reply
    1. william burns

      yeah, BS. my 2019 F350 has been doing this to me, even forcing me off the highway a couple times. One of the more recent times was towing a 9500lb skid/trailer combo.

      Reply
    2. Mike Brown

      It would be nearly impossible to haul my 2020 Montana 5th wheel with a F-150. I struggled to tow my little travel trailer with my old F-150. There is a reason for the larger vehicle. Unless you’re advocating for a complete shutdown of the RV industry?

      Reply
  4. FPVfan

    Forgot to add this. Since Ford wants to compete in the electric market. It already has the Mach-E, why not bring out a few of the cool concepts that they’ve had for so long such as the Mach-3 Roadster from back in the early 90’s to battle the Tesla Roadster, the Ford GT90 supercar but as a much less expensive electric competition to the Lamborghini Huracan EVO coupe, a more road going GT40 to challenge the Ferrari 488 GTB, the Ford EVOS, and the Ford Interceptor and 427 concepts as well as the aforementioned ATLAS pickup to compete with the upcoming GMC Hummer

    Reply
  5. Pat

    What a load, I have to assume most of these complaints come from people who don’t drive or could never afford these newer incredible luxury high end trucks. We own & drive a few from the past years right up until a new Ford 2020 F-350 Lariat Tremor. Over a 100 $ large with tax, but worth every penny. As always, beware of people who make comments out of spite & with absolutely no knowledge. Cheers & keep working hard “)

    Reply
  6. Ellen

    To Pat that commented and others that think this issue is BS. Our son almost lost his life because of his 2015 F250. He purchased it used from a dealership last year and his wife has driven it daily with their 5 year old. Thank God he was alone when this death wobble happened and he had the driving experience to keep it from turning over. We had never heard of this before. How many trucks will be destroyed, people hurt or killed before Ford fixes this issue?
    Pat dont degrade people saying they are lying and cant afford these vehicles because it’s a true issue.

    Reply
  7. John P Rasmussen

    I currently own a 2019 F-250 super duty crew cab long box single rear wheels. I pull a 12,000 lb fifth wheel camper amongst other things. Although I can say when the truck is empty and I am not towing anything the front end does have quite a bit of bounce to it. I would expect that though having E rated tires inflated to 65/70 pounds. I have never experienced the death wobble in any of my super duties. Mine is an XLT nothing fancy. I love my super duties and I will be trading mine in soon for a 2022. Any truck or vehicle four-wheel drive with a solid front axle has prone to the death wall wobble It is the nature of the beast. All as I can say is maintain your vehicle including your tires and suspension and you will probably be fine. Like I said I have never had any issue with a death wobble yet.

    Reply
  8. Rodney Norvell

    I have a 2017 F350.
    I have had it in the dealership 5 times for death wobble. Each time they say they have corrected the problem. One fix only lasted three days.
    Each time drags links, ball joints steering dampeners etc had to be replaced because of damage from intense death wobble.
    Thank heavens each time my extended warranty covered any charges less deductible. Now they tell me warranty does not cover these parts. They claim now that worn parts are causing the death wobble so they won’t fix the problem unless I pay $2,200.
    I only have 106k on the truck.
    They used to replace the parts because death wobble ruined them now they push owners out the door because they can get away with “worn parts are causing death wobble”.
    First death wobble experience happened at 24k.
    Extended warranty means nothing!

    Reply
  9. Damon Conte

    2012 F350 XL Super Cab. Bought used @ 57k miles. Experienced the Death Wabble 4x. 70ish mph. Craziest shyte ever! No lie. Every tool, and item in truck tossed violently. Thank God I was able to keep control. I have complete sympathy for any driver who crashed during this experience. I have replaced all steering components, shocks and even reduced the tire size to 17″ from 18″ and no change. This problem is real and inexcusable. Having owned Ford’s my entire life, l truly feel that the front axel rating of 6k is way too high for this class vehicle. My 01′ Excursion, with a Rough Country 3″ lift kit and 33″ tires, rides like a Prius compared to my 2012. Why? Lower front axel rating. The tremer of the stiffer coil front suspension of my 2012 starts, then reverberates through the entire vehicle. When talking on the phone while driving, the tremer shakes your vocal cords. Insult to injury, these trucks are expensive. Ford needs to remember it’s us devoted drivers who made them popular. Do the right thing, Ford and correct YOUR design flaw(s). And I’m not just talking about faulty suspension components. I think I have a leg to stand on when stating my demands. (4) F350s, (1) F450, (1) Excursion. I’m proud to say, that I’m a devoted Ford guy. Unfortunately, devotion, in this case, isn’t being mutually reciprocated.

    Reply
  10. Thomas

    I have a 2015 F250 Super Duty King . It had the Death Wobble and the Ford dealership COULD NOT FIX IT.
    I had to buy and after market part for $200.00 that a diesel mechanic my son new told me how to fix it. This was after I bought 2 new sets of tires for the truck when the tires on it were less than half worn out. The cost in addtional tires was over $2,000.00. Ford and the Dealership were totally worthless in helping.

    Reply

Leave a comment

Cancel