2020 Mustang EcoBoost 2.3L High Performance Package: What Do You Want To Know?

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We’re spending this week with the 2020 Mustang EcoBoost with the 2.3L High Performance Package (HPP) – the one that replaces the EcoBoost Performance Pack available in prior model years.

Our model starts out as an EcoBoost Premium Convertible before getting the optional HPP. It’s coated in Oxford White with an Ebony leather-trimmed interior with Alcantara accents.

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The Mustang EcoBoost with the 2.3L High Performance Package is powered by a special variant of the 2.3L EcoBoost I-4 engine rated at 330 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque. Shifting duty is done via a six-speed manual transmission, and power is sent to the rear wheels – as is the case on all S500 Mustangs.

As it sits, the model retails for $44,215.

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We’ll have this drop-top pony for a week, so if you would like to know more about it beyond the spec sheet, ask your questions in the comments section below, and we’ll reply in a timely manner as part of our interactive review.

Ready… set… go!

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Written by Alex Luft

Ford Authority founder with a passion for global automotive business strategy.

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11 Comments

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  1. Would you lease post a video of the exhaust sound, both at idle and under acceleration? Thanks, I’ve been curious how it compares to the standard Ecoboost and V8.

    • Yup, will record it today. Should have something by the end of the week.

      Until then, I will say this: it does sound good. It’s no V8, but it’s a good-sounding four.

    • There are technically three engines at play here:
      1. 2.3L EcoBoost I-4 in the Ranger, which we can call the “regular” version of this engine. It makes 270 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque.
      2. 2.3L EcoBoost I-4 in the Mustang EcoBoost, which is a higher performance variant of #1. It makes 310 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque.
      3. 2.3L EcoBoost I-4 in the Mustang EcoBoost with the High Performance Package, which is an even higher performance version of #2. It makes 330 horsepower (at a higher RPM than engine #2) and 350 pound-feet of torque (with 90 percent of peak torque available between 2,500 and 5,300 rpm, which is 40 percent wider than engine #2).

      Mechanically, the difference between engines #1 and #2 is the inclusion of high-pressure block and heads, delivering a different compression ratio (10.0:1 vs. 9.5:1, respectively).

      The difference between engines #2 and #3 is the addition of a high-tensile strength liner and a high-strength cast aluminum head, resulting in a compression ratio of 9.37:1. Engine #3 also has a slightly larger twin-scroll turbo, revised calibration and a larger radiator.

  2. How does the MT82 manual transmission perform. What is your impression? Would you buy the 6 speed in this car?

    • Personally, I like the MT82 in this car. It does its job, and I’ve yet to experience any issues with it, shifting, sound, or otherwise. I also like the feel of the gate and shifter, both feel solid and precise.

      • Forgot to answer the second part of your question: yes, I would get the six-speed in this car without hesitation. I know that some have had some issues with the MT82, leading to some legal action. But as far as my personal experience goes, I’ve not had a single issue.

        For some more context, my daily driver is a C7 Corvette Grand Sport with the 7-speed manual and I prefer the shifting feel and performance of the 6-speed in the Mustang.

  3. Is this worth the additional expense over a typical Mustang EcoBoost and would you rather have a GT at that price point?

    • There’s roughly a $3,500 difference between a base Mustang EcoBoost Premium with the 2.3L HPP ($37,520 Coupe / $43,020 Convertible) and the base Mustang GT Premium ($41,075 Coupe / $46,575 Convertible). Note that the base GT Premium doesn’t have active exhaust, so that’s another $900 that the HPP includes, so adding the active exhaust to the GT increases the difference to around $4,500.

      Other things to consider:
      – The EcoBoost doesn’t have Rev Match, even as an option, but the GT gets it standard.
      – Optional packages are needed to get the Torsen limited slip diff on the HPP and on the GT.

      So now the question is, does $4,500 make the GT worth it? For me, the answer is yes because that 5.0L Coyote is really good. However, there are many factors at play here, so I’m not sure if everyone will feel the same way. The EcoBoost with the HPP is a very formidable package, I’ll tell you that. It feels fast and it sounds good… and being $4,500 cheaper can be an added bonus for many.

  4. I have a 2020 Mustang EcoBoost 2.3L HPP. The Chassis number is L0718 written on a plate on the dash. What does this number stand for? Someone told me the vehicle is a limited production car. How many will be manufactured?

  5. Slightly o/t ……… As a Corvette owner, which would choose ? The C8 w/Z51 or, the upcoming Mach 1? The C8 is mid engined for the first time, w/o a manual. As I would option a Mach 1 with the handling pkg, it would be close to a 1LT, Z51 w/mag ride in price. I should note I am a long time Corvette owner. Starting with the C1 and just sold my ’17 Z06 (dumb on my part) 🙁
    Michael

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