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Insane Crown Victoria Project Is Getting A World War II Tank Engine Swap

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It wasn’t all that long ago when the mega-sedan ruled the world, and everyone wanted to cruise around in something like a Ford Crown Victoria. These days, the car that every speeder hopes isn’t an undercover police officer has become a popular enthusiast toy, not to mention a parts donor for classic Ford trucks. But this Crown Victoria, which is in the process of getting a tank engine swap, is easily the craziest Vic project we’ve ever laid eyes on.

The Crown Vic is owned by a Swedish resident named Daniel Werner, who had a car and a dream. He simply wanted to do something different than the average engine swap, and at first considered using a 37L Rolls-Royce Griffon engine from a Spitfire fighter plane. Ultimately, he realized that this might be a bit difficult to do, so he decided to downsize. To a 27L Meteor engine from a World War II-era tank. That’s 1,647 cubic-inches, in case anyone was wondering.

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Luckily, many Swedish tanks from this era utilized the Meteor engine, and there are quite a few of them sitting around with nothing to do, apparently. We suppose that’s just part of the deal when it’s a tank living in a neutral country. Only problem is, these engines only produce around 550 horsepower in stock form, and that’s just not enough for Werner.

So the Swede has also acquired a pair of gigantic turbos and a custom ECU that he hopes will push the horsepower of this tank engine up to at least 2,500. Werner reckons that his Crown Victoria is tough enough to handle this massive motor, but he’s beefing up the front end to handle all the extra weight just in case.

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There are many other problems associated with a build like this, too. The Meteor only revs to around 3,000 rpm, and if pushed too hard, will boil its coolant. So Werner isn’t eyeing the local drags, but instead plans on pushing his Crown Vic past 200 miles-per-hour. And one can bet that we’ll be keeping at least one eye glued to this incredible machine to see if he can make that dream a reality.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

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Now the exhaust manifolds are almost finished. Some final welding left to do, and then they are ready for action. Enjoy and have a nice weekend 😃 #themeteorinterceptor #rollsroycemeteor #crownvictoria #policeinterceptor #percusab

A post shared by The Meteor Interceptor (@the_meteor_interceptor) on


We’ll have more on this and other cool projects soon, so be sure to subscribe to Ford Authority for more Crown Victoria news and around-the-clock Ford news coverage.

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Written by Brett Foote

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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3 Comments

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  1. Dude should have seen if he could find a V8 engine from a Sherman. Those GAF, GAA, and GAD variants have 18L of displacement. There are people who use them in tractor pulling.

  2. See, FORD could have put the 6.8L V10 in that and it would have fit fairly easily since they shared pretty much the same block with 2 cylinders tacked on.

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