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Clean 1969 Lincoln Continental A Fine Example Of A Fourth-Gen

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The Lincoln Continental went through a lot of changes when the fourth-generation model launched in 1961. Ford corporate management had a goal of creating the finest mass produced automobile of all-time, and in turn built a vehicle that was subjected to a rigorous post-build inspection, which resulted in a rock solid construction. The model went on to change several times throughout the fourth-generation, culminating in this – the 1969 Lincoln Continental.

This particular 1969 Lincoln Continental is a fine example of its breed, and it’s also currently up for sale at Classic Cars. The car has undergone a bit of a restoration, but not something so intricate that we’d be afraid to drive it. As if often the case, this particular Continental has been lowered somewhat with springs in the front and an air suspension.

The exterior of the car is very clean, and painted the perfect shade of black. A set of black-painted steel wheels provides the perfect contrast, at least when paired with wide white wall tires and red stripes. All of the upholstery in the matching black interior has been replaced, along with the carpet, and it all looks incredibly tidy as well.

The classic Lincoln is powered by a brand new Ford 460 cubic-inch V8 fitted with a full array of Edelbrock parts and a Holley four-barrel carburetor. It breathes through a Flowmaster stainless steel exhaust, and is mated to a Ford automatic transmission. The car itself has just over 120,000 miles on the chassis, which isn’t too bad for a vehicle of this vintage.

For anyone who’s a fan of the fourth-gen Lincoln Continental, this final-year model is certainly worthy of a closer look. It’s a shining example of everything we love about these cars, but isn’t so perfect or valuable that the new owner will be afraid to cruise in it. And that, truthfully, is where it really shines.

We’ll have more cool classics like this to share soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for more Lincoln news, Lincoln Continental news, and non-stop Ford news coverage.

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Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Roy Chiles

    1961-1969 Continentals will be the models that hunt Lincoln’s future for years to come. Ford and Lincoln found money for a return from the past for the Mustang, FORD GT, and Bronco then slap Continental iconic name on a FWD Ford Fusion and said we tried it didn’t work??? 1961-69 are the Continental we all was waiting for….

    Reply
  2. Crabbymilton

    Well we can go back and forth why the 2017-20 version failed but it was any number of factors. I still like it. Those vintage CONTINENTAL’s should
    have been examined as the foundation for a new version. This is what it could have been like had FORD wanted to.
    I’m in love and wished they built these here. A 5.0L V8 hybrid so you can imagine how quiet it is.

    https://youtu.be/9uLXIDPvDk4

    Reply
    1. Roy Chiles

      Yes we can agree to disagree, I alone with 100,000’s of other customers passed on the 2017-20 for the biggest reason it’s FWD Fusion platform. Did you notice the Lincoln Aviator didn’t return until the Ford Explorer got a new RWD platform? There’s a reason Chrysler 300/ Dodge Charger still sales 12+yrs later there RWD

      Reply
      1. crabbymilton

        At least the CONTINENTAL didn’t offer a 4 cylinder version like the CT6 did. People even commented that while it had good power, the sound just didn’t seem right in a car of that size and price range but you can’t do much about it. But then again, the SILVERADO and gasoline full size SPRINTER van have 4 cylinder engines as standard or optional equipment. So if you can live with the noise, they are ok I guess. I can’t see FCA putting a 4 cylinder in the 300 but if they do, it would likely be targeted for fleet use only.

        Reply
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