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Here’s Why The 5.0L Coyote V8 Engine Will Never Be Used In The New Bronco

It’s no secret that enthusiasts have been clamoring for a V8-powered version of the 2021 Ford Bronco, particularly one packing Ford’s 5.0L Coyote V8. And though the aftermarket will most certainly provide at least one version of the new Bronco with the Coyote underhood, it doesn’t seem like we’ll ever see the sixth-generation Ford Bronco come equipped with a V8 from the factory.

Ford Authority executive editor, Alex Luft, spoke with Bronco Chief Engineer Eric Loeffler at the Bronco Day event last month. Loeffler admitted that Ford never considered offering the new Bronco with Ford’s 5.0L Coyote V8, as the automaker is confident that its 2.3L EcoBoost I-4 and 2.7L EcoBoost V6 will suit its customers just fine.

“The powertrains that we have we believe are the appropriate size, weight, and horsepower for what customers need to do,” Loeffler said, referring to the two EcoBoost engines. “You’ll feel that when you drive the one with the 2.7, it’s quite adequate, particularly when you start getting into where you want to put the weight in the vehicle and balance and torque and so on, it was just the right fit for the car.”

Projected output for Ford’s 2.3L EcoBoost I-4 in the Bronco is 270 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque, while the 2.7L EcoBoost V6 is projected to produce 310 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque in this application.

The Ford Bronco Raptor will come equipped with Ford’s 3.0L EcoBoost V6 producing around 400 horsepower. That range-topping model, which might end up being called Warthog, as per Ford’s trademark filing, is expected to be added to the lineup for the 2023 model year towards the end of the 2022 calendar year.

We’ll have much more on the Bronco very soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for more Ford Bronco news and continuous Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Roy Chiles

    Never Say “ NEVER”

    Reply
    1. Rory Barnes

      Don’t let ideology get in the way of reality.

      If an engine is not planned or even considered, then that’s the way it is. Simple as that.

      Reply
      1. Roy Chiles

        Plans Change when there’s Competition Nothing is written in STONE, remember that

        Reply
  2. badlybent

    Memo to Loeffler: Spend less time listening to the talking heads in marketing, and more time listening to true enthusiasts. “Adequate” is never enough power, too much is the starting point, and you build on that.

    Reply
    1. Rick Allbrite

      Your comment is only true for a very small subset of the population. For most, the EcoBoosts will be more than good enough. Time to step out of the dinosaur era…

      Reply
      1. Dave Cusack

        Unfortunately I think your comment @rick allbrite is too close to accurate.
        The days of the heart leading the head in large automakers is long gone 🙁

        Reply
  3. gareth furlong

    I see no reason for putting a V8 in a bronco as the 3.0 litre eco boost is a ripper.As for realiblty eco boost engines with the correct regular maintenance can do monster miles so realibty is not a issue.If ford do put a V8 in the bronco then give people the choice of the 3.0 liter eco boost or the V8(i bet a lot will go with the 3.0 liter eco boost).Just becuase jeep are saying they are going to do it ford do need to follow!.

    Reply
    1. Matt

      “Does not “do.” Come on man! lol

      Reply
  4. Gergy yerky

    Here’s why I will never buy a new Bronco… it doesn’t have a 5.0 in it.

    Reply
  5. James

    So if you skip the Bronco because it wont’ have a V-8 then what other ride are you considering? If you say the current gen Wrangle then your “want” for the V-8 argument just became invalid as the Wrangler doesn’t have one either and therefore Ford isn’t losing your purchase to a competitor. If Jeep does drop a V-8 to me its just a straight up ploy to say were better because for decades not Jeep has not put a V-8 in and there has been comments to do so is borderline reckless. Also how much power do you really need for crying out loud when you consider the Bronco in Crawler gear can create over 29,000 fl/lb of wheel torque… At some point too much power just equals more/easier wheel spin at lower RPM’s which often is not helpful..

    Reply
    1. Roy Chiles

      Jeep will put a V8 in the Wrangler if only for sales of new customers, Ford should do the same as they have with the Raptor since hearing Dodge announcement of a SuperChargered V8. The V8 ain’t dead yet so put one in it.In the years to come all V8s will be the most sort out models of enthusiast, classics, and investment

      Reply
  6. Whatever

    ““The powertrains that we have we believe are the appropriate size, weight, and horsepower for what customers need to do””
    How friggin arrogant! The sooner Ford learns that it’s all about what the customer WANTS, the sooner the company will see a tsunami of sales flying out of the dealership doors!

    Reply
  7. Mike

    See this is the ish that really irritates me, quit assuming that this is what’s best for customers. Yes the ecoboost 4 has V6 power and the ecoboost 6 has V8 power. But there’s nothing like the raw unadulterated naturally asperated V8, build it and they will come.

    Reply
  8. Ra Whit

    You can go back and forth on the engine, but it is a matter of what you expect from the engine (and drivetrain as a whole).
    Those who depend on the engine for reliability, ease of maintenance, home/self repairs, long lasting/high mileage, will not choose the eco-boost. Regardless of lab/test numbers/specs…it cannot be relied on. It has a horrible record overall, I am not talking about “I know someone who had one and it was great”. I am talking about the average mileage able to get from one before heavy parts fatigue and how often the factory has had to make improvements (which is a lot on the eco-boost). The 281 was statistically the most reliable (based on above criteria) engine Ford has ever produced. The 5.0 (if you include all versions) stands pretty well in reliability, it is actually 4th with statistics standing like this 4.6, 300 ci straight 6, 460, 5.0. This stats include cost of maintaining and engine, high mileage ability (I plugged in over 300,000 as my baseline). 3 of these engines have 20+ years as Gov Service Vehicles, which also proved reliability. I do not think we will see many eco-boosts in service with over 300,000 miles.
    Now…if you do not expect any of those things from your engine, and drive 30k a year, and will only own 3-5 years, the eco will probably do ok…though you will still spend on repairs.

    So that is my dime, other’s mileage may vary.

    Reply
  9. Coyote or nothing

    Why would you ever want to add turbochargers and more moving parts to try and fire more power out of an Engine that small? The fact is the ecoboost reliability is the worst of any engine ever. Turbochargers go bad timing chains stretch and you are looking at either replacing turbochargers, huge engine work bills, or a new engine by 125k. A 5L is a lighter engine has more power and can meet the same fuel consumption and has no turbochargers to go bad. Those engines just purr along till well over 350k and they are cheaper…

    Reply
  10. Allen Morse

    Automaker’s don’t build cars to become classics anymore. They just build plastic disposable cars. The 4 banger decision just proves that to be true even more. I really have always wanted one of the old broncs. When I found out Ford was getting ready to put these into production I decided I would wait for a V8. They say they won’t do it. But a few years of bad sales will either kill the project or make them listen to the customer. The car industry continues to go down hill with all the extras and pathetic reliability. Mostly because of attempting to cut cost and poor management. I mean basically all you gotta do when you want to build a vehicle that is suppose to be capable of handling off-road is go to a small town. Look at all the trucks riding around with no exhaust, no AC, no radio, and mostly manual transmissions. The project could have been done correctly by making is just a V8 with a metal dash and 5 speed manual transmission. And of course a 4 wheel drive shift handle. I don’t even like electric 4wd buttons. If we wanted plastic 4 bangers we would buy a honda.

    Reply
  11. tommyjimalfa

    Thanks for sharing your information in your blog

    Reply
  12. Paul

    Hey Ford, don’t tell me what I need. No one “needs” this SUV. I want a vehical that is fun to drive and excites me. A pared down version is still just over $40000. Take off a lot of the crap forced options and include a manual transmission with every engine option. That said, also include a small V8 with a manual. Want me to buy your product, make something worth buying. I am not spending over $40000 for something that is not fun to drive. BTW, automatics are not fun to drive.

    Reply
  13. Ritter Friedrich

    I want a Bronco… but only if it has a Coyote in it…
    I have a 4.0 Jeep LJ Rubicon… and and V8 M3…
    I want those combined…. I need a V8 in my next ride…
    and the turbo v6 sounds terrible… I can’t have that in my life for next 20 years…
    so I’m left looking at 392 Wrangler…

    Reply

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