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Not Smart Ford F-150 Owner Exceeds Truck’s Payload Capacity By A Touch

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There is a reason why automakers like Ford attach maximum payload and tow ratings to their pickups. It might be alright to exceed these capacities by a little bit every now and then, but going way over or doing it on a regular basis is definitely not a good idea. Aside from causing wear and tear and potential parts failure on the pickup, it’s also a big time safety risk. But this particular Ford F-150 owner doesn’t seem too worried about any of that.

The single photo was posted to Reddit recently with a simple heading – “don’t be this guy.” It’s certainly solid advice for anyone looking to haul a heavy load in the back of their F-150. And there are many reasons why this is a bad idea. For starters, just look at the poor rear suspension of the truck – it’s clearly loaded far beyond the limit, as the bed is squatting down while the front of the pickup is pointed at the sky.

We can’t imagine that riding around with this much weight in the back of the truck makes it much fun to drive, either, aside from the major visibility issue caused by that uneven weight distribution. The twelfth-generation Ford F-150 features a max payload rating of somewhere between 1,046 and 1,988 pounds depending on the configuration, so this stack of lumber must weigh a good bit more than that.

The other, non-truck related problem for this Ford F-150 owner is the fact that several of the boards on top look to have been damaged by the ratchet strap. It’s safe to say that he’s going to have to make another trip regardless, so why not split up this load in the first place? It’s the equivalent of trying to haul all of the grocery bags upstairs at once. Sure, we might save a trip, but is it worth pulling a muscle (or breaking suspension parts) doing it?

We’ll have more crazy pics like this to share soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford F-Series news, Ford F-150 news, and continuous Ford news coverage.

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Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. George S

    The stack on top of the drywall is foam board and that part of the load is light compared to the rest of the items. Since the foam board is mounted on a pallet and stacked very straight I’m guessing that this was loaded on with a forklift by the retailer. This also places blame on the retailer and in a accident or other calamity.

    Reply
    1. Bad Monkey

      It actually doesn’t as most have waiver form for the stupid. Worked at home depot during college and trust me there is no shortage of stupid as i would go through 5-10 of those forms on a single Saturday. I’ve seen snapped axle shafts, truck bed bolts break off at the frame, to car roofs cave in. All the while a $39.99 per hr rental 3/4 ton flatbed set ready for work in the parking lot.

      Reply
      1. Chuck Norris

        Ohhhh you went to ‘college’… Some of us have as well and received a master’s or doctorates. It doesn’t matter what waiver an individual signs. The retailer can still be held accountable because you as the loader have to use good judgement. A judge will even ask you this and question your and your employers ability to functionally think critically and understand vehicle load limits. You the employee loaded the vehicle and are liable, regardless of what the ‘owner’ of the vehicle states. So you load your own company vehicles the same way and disregard their limits? I doubt it. Your comment is irresponsible.

        Reply
        1. Mr. T

          How Trump of you to start your criticism with a gratuitous insult. Are you a practicing lawyer? Waivers are regularly upheld by the courts. If the above truck load damaged the truck or caused an accident, the truck owner would beheld responsible, not the building supply company.

          Reply
          1. Tim Ertz

            How lame of you to take cheap shot about Trump while the subject isn’t even political. Did you get past the third grade Jethro 😆 lol

            Reply
            1. Tim Ertz

              How lame of you to take cheap shot about Trump while the subject isn’t even political. Did you get past the third grade Jethro 😆 lol

              Reply
        2. Chuck Norris - Small brain, Big mouth

          Chuck Norris is the Karen of the comments section. Got his doctorate from Trump University before it went belly up.

          Reply
        3. Natricjol

          I guess this phrase “Worked at home depot during college” eluded you and you saw the word college and got triggered. I guess we know who didn’t get an education.

          If you missed it, he gave you a general time of his life when he happened to work at a Home Depot. At no point did he say he went to college and knew more than you.

          Reply
        4. Rik

          Your comment is irresponsible. The onus is entirely on the vehicle operator. The yard worker was not the driver. Look it up. How is the employee supposed to know the weight limits of every worker. If it was within limits and he ties his load down with a shoelace, is it still on the employee? Give your head a shake.

          Reply
      2. John

        I used to put 22 bags of 80# bags os salt on my Ford ranger…and drove 23 miles before unloading…..overloaded…. yes … I drove slow and did not damage the suspension!

        Reply
      3. Robert

        A waiver will not protect you or home depot from negligence when this truck rolls over and kills several people. My advice to anyone working loading trucks is that if someone wants you to do something unsafe, tell them that you are uncomfortable with what they are doing and refuse to participate. A waiver although being a legal document, is not the law. Many have found this out the hard way.

        Reply
    2. Chris A

      George

      Retailer could be held liable if said idiot gets into a crash and someone is hurt or worse. As stated before retailer has you sign a waiver form regarding said stupidity. More important how about said idiot take responsibility for him or her self and not be an idiot in the first place and then attempt to shift blame onto the retailer when said idiot uses poor judgment. There is no excuse for good decision making. Life is all about the choices we make and the responsibility we assume or don’t.

      Reply
      1. Ezra James

        That’s nothing I’ve had the front wheels bouncing off the ground had to put it in for low just to make a turn on my 05 Ford f150 these trucks are seriously tough and anybody that says anything negative about that truck hauling all that drywall is definitely a stupid nodriver, and or a chevrolet fan, it’s not stupidity it’s getting your money’s worth,I look at it as if something can’t handle what I can give it then I don’t want it and Ford can definitely handle it, I have ran the crap out of my truck since I’ve owned it I’ve had some stuff break like transmission I’ve had replaced the that’s the biggest thing these trucks are like the Energizer Bunny I keep going and going and going if I could post a picture on here I would.

        Reply
        1. charlie

          Are you serious? I don’t care what happens to your ford or the idiot in the pictures truck, but i do care about the safety of other people riding on the same roads as them. I’m tired of working so many accidents caused by people who have no business having a license. Us

          Unfortunately, they end up causing deaths but usually not their own just like drunks. If you want a big boys truck, get the F350 dually. I just traded my 2001 F350 with 377k on it for a GMC 3500 Dually so I would have a warranty and I wanted this type of truck so that we can haul horse trailers and the living quarter trailer which is very heavy. If a F350 or GMC 3500 can’t hold it then there’s a problem.

          Reply
          1. Ezra James

            Ha ha there’s always somebody that that went to college that knows more than everybody and can’t stand to be wrong or proven wrong the real idiot here is the dumbass that his parents told him that he could be anything he wanted to be and he is also the idiot that didn’t get his ass whipped by his Mommy and Daddy and everything handed to him everything I say I can prove so if you go out there and cause an accident because you can’t drive sure to ask that college professor that knows it all because I don’t know what I’m talking about ha ha can’t wait for the smart ass to comment about this I love it especially when turn nothing into something 😂🤣

            Reply
            1. NB

              Ezra. The irony in your reply is hilarious. You’re making fun of the ‘idiot’ who went to college, but you don’t even know how to use punctuation. Your whole comment is 1 sentence – that’s some grade 1 lessons. Haha!

              Reply
        2. Wayne Wiley

          Exactly! Fords are very tough!

          Reply
        3. Chris

          I would say if you’re friend drove 20 miles to your house with an over loaded truck of fire wood to help you out for free then you would call him an idiot. Get real people do things to cut cost and time just like the government.

          Reply
  2. Gary

    WOW! Maybe this guy just doesn’t like his pickup. Hey Moe, Hey Larry.😆

    Reply
  3. Irvin

    80 percent of braking is done by front brakes. He is seriously reducing braking ability, plus more total weight to bring to a stop. I guess with the nose that high he won’t see what he runs into.

    Reply
    1. Bennett

      Its more like 70 percent, under normal load conditions. THAT BEING SAID, the reason why the front brakes more than the rear is not because the rear brakes are incapable of braking as much, but because of the distribution of weight.

      A simple way of calculating how much breaking force a tire is able to provide is the weight the tire is supporting multiplied by the coefficient of static friction. A way to figure out the amount of braking power the front vs the back is able to provide, take the weight over the rear axle and divide it by the weight over the front axle. That number will be the factor by which the truck distributes braking force.

      TLDR: with that weight distribution, the majority of the braking force would be provided by the rear brakes.

      Reply
  4. Dave D.

    If this idiot is involved in an accident, he will lose everything.

    Reply
  5. Ernie

    Max payload for 12th generation trucks was up to 2900# not 1988# when properly equipped. Of course that’s no excuse for overloading his truck like that. How hard would it have been to borrow or rent a trailer? SMH!

    Reply
    1. John W

      Right. My F150 has a 3000# payload. But also an 11,000# towing capacity. A load like that should be on a trailer, and then tow it safely. Article should focus more on the idiot and less on the truck.

      Reply
  6. Tarheels

    I agree Ernie. Or how about….make another trip!!

    Reply
  7. Radon DeTerre

    Maybe he only has to drive 3 blocks with no lights and right hand turns only. I’ve overloaded many trucks for short trips with nary a problem.

    Reply
  8. Bruce Perens

    I’m dubious that the photo is unmanipulated. Most of the materials portrayed are lightweight, like foamboard, and I’m wondering where in this pile is the weight that would force an F-150 into a squat.

    Reply
    1. John W

      Manipulated? Doubtful. Look at the location of the load. Much of the weight extends past the bed, thus behind the rear axle. The trucks handles the maximum load best when the weight is centered in the bed above the axle. Bring too much weight behind it, it is like the big boy on a teeter-totter. And the picture is outside of a materials store. Looks like a natural unaltered picture. And we all know, there are plenty of fools weekly who do things similar to this. I have a bed extender in mine. When I purchase 60# concrete bags, 18 is the maximum I buy at any one time. I cannot throw them higher in the bed. All are in the bed behind the real axle. That is 1080 pounds, it does not exceed my load rating, but it is all behind the axle. So I do not press it. Why hurt the truck. My bumper sinks with that weight. Nothing like this picture, but it goes down a few inches.

      Reply
      1. John Davidson

        What are you worried about ??? Its not a chevy itll be fine ive loaded tons of crushed stone in my F150 no issues. FORD TOUGH

        Reply
  9. Tony Ray Blanton

    wait its ok he has on the proper loading reflective suspenders and its a ford. stay calm it will be ok. everone back up from the overloaded comments slowly,… for safety

    Reply
  10. Zack

    He should have bought a newer model of the F150 the newer ones can haul a heck of a lot more in the beds and the F250 and up can haul almost 8,000 pounds and can tow almost 50,000 it’s on YouTube and on google Them Ford trucks can tow way past their rating but that dude went wayyyy past the limit.

    Reply
  11. Eric

    I believe it’s the sheet rock under the foam board put it over the edge. Looks from the horrible picture and on my tiny phone to be a stack of 20 4×8 sheets so that’s 1,000 pounds right there if it’s only 1/2 inch.

    Reply
  12. Mike

    It’s a Ford, don’t worry about the mule, load the wagon!!!

    Reply
    1. Willie Dee

      Yeah…remember the F150 pulled a train last year and nothing happened

      Reply
  13. Jenny Q

    Why does the material look lightweight but the bed is squatting?? Idk. Too much g force from the load stacked and strap forcing it in place and downward? This guy needs to be patient and make a round-trip or rent a truck from home depot; which is much cheaper the price than a broken axel or death.

    Reply
  14. Doug

    At what point does the retailer that loaded it have liability?

    Reply
    1. MacGyver

      At the point the customer sues the retailer and they settle out of court.

      Reply
    2. Michael

      They don’t. Customer is required to sign a waiver before they will load the truck. They also offer one of their own trucks for rent, or to have the customer pay for delivery. When will people learn that cheap does not save you money.

      Reply
  15. CT

    I get 2200#… He may have exceeded the weight limit, but how far away is the job?

    Reply
  16. Zacarias Blanco

    This is why i dont let no one borrow my truck

    Reply
  17. ROBERT SANCHEZ

    Those are about 30 sheets of drywall @50 pounds a piece of they are 1/2″ so that puts him at 1500lbs abs add the assortment of 8′ and 10′ lumber which clearly exceeds 500lbs if they are mildly humid plus the long pallet 80lbs and 50lbs of foam panels that sets him up to close to 2200lbs if the wood is relatively dry. I do not know what year that f150 is but if it’s one of the news ones I’d say he is about s couple of hundred pounds over since this looks to be a stx package so this is not the one that has the maximum payload number.

    Reply
    1. Ezra James

      You’re right I am no better than anyone else, college degree or not so I apologize to whoever I offended the way the world is today I don’t want to be that one extra person that makes life harder. I had a bad day and I took it out on something that I was not even for sure of, with that being said no one should ever overload any vehicle because of the chance of an accident, it could hurt or potentially kill someone.

      Reply
  18. Allen Hanford

    Looks good to me. I’d race it.

    Reply
  19. Gary

    Looking at the picture, the truck has been squatted… The rear suspension is intentionally lowered. That isn’t near enough weight to depress the suspension to this point.

    Reply
  20. Steve

    I did a stint at lowes many years ago. While working in lumber, a guy wanted me to load up a full decks worth of wet treated lumber into his truck. I refused and told everyone else not to load it for him. Dude was DISPLEASED! He finished loading up and all but peeled out of the lot with the front of his truck pointing at the sky. We get a call a few minutes later from the guy. Seems a good bit of that wet lumber practically dragging behind his truck decided to relieve itself of his company right in the middle of an intersection just up the street. Tough break.

    Reply
  21. Christopher D Morris

    This entire image is totally fabricated by the Ford Motor Company. All of you readers that are calling this guy an idiot , you clearly did not look at the post. They are wanting to hire a photographer and editor so they fabricated this picture. then posting it making you think that they’re idiots out there that would do this to their own truck. furthermore no freaking way would any loader at a warehouse put that on the back of a pickup truck because It would make them legally responsible for damage to the truck and the person causing a motor vehicle accident if he actually made it to the highway. If you’re calling anybody an idiot call yourself an idiot for believing that this pic is real.

    Reply
    1. Brett Foote

      I’m not really sure what you’re talking about here, as this picture was posted by a user on Reddit, as noted (and linked to) in the post, and Ford Authority is an independent entity not affiliated with or supported by Ford Motor Company, its brands or subsidiaries.

      Reply
  22. Joe Husand

    I highly doubt the individual that loaded this truck also owns this truck. It probably belongs to his employer.

    Reply
  23. Barb

    DOT checks the weight capacity of tires, for vehicle and trailer combos when checking for overloaded vehicles.

    Reply
  24. Tom

    Only a Ford would haul that load anyway Awesome shot

    Reply
  25. John

    No ecoboost badge, its a short bed, supercab, and 6.2l is really rare to none in a supercab mainly in regular and supercrew. So max payload is 1510-1870. For any magical reason that truck is rated 3000 very unsafe due to suspension. I would pull him over. NOT SMART!!!

    Reply
  26. M edwards

    You people that believe a f150 can haul 8,000 of anything or two 50,000 ibs of anything don’t know squat about a load on a truck. Yeah I drive a 250 super duty.

    Reply
  27. Craig Huyett

    There are about 20 sheets of drywall under that foam board and add that to all the lumber, that weight would squat and stock half ton truck.

    Reply
  28. king daddy

    cut the dude some slack. the safety vest is a clear indication that he passed his OSHA certification. Next question – where to put the drywall screws – maybe in the trailer!

    Reply
  29. Thom

    Heck, I imagine Ford would love have you good ole boys working for them as engineers. It’s clear, you know way more about their trucks than they do.

    Reply
  30. scott k

    designs for construction equipment need to be bulletproof, have seen more stupid warranty claims that I can count.

    Reply
  31. Jeremy

    I worked at a Menards store during college (92-93) and seeing these poor 1/2 ton trucks with their headlights pointed skyward was a pretty common sight. A commercial driver would have been ticketed into oblivion but Joe Regular could all but leave the yard pulling a wheelie.

    Reply
  32. Billy J Yett

    George s that is not foam board that is actually a concrete drywall

    Reply
  33. Dave Mathers

    I sold a company a new 77 F350 duallie with a dump box. It had a 10,000# GVW. The truck came in on the hook with a broken right rear axle. Apparently they thought the 10 grand was how much the truck could carry!! D’oh. We figured the truck with load was almost 23,000#!!

    Reply
  34. Jim

    Ahemdumba**ahem.

    Reply
  35. Charles Kominek

    Should have gotten a ticket for unsafe load. The person who loaded it should have been fired.

    Reply
  36. Freeman

    It looks like 16sheets of dry wall and @77lbs each that’s 1232#s right there.once when I worked for a lumber company I had a guy load up his truck like a space shuttle an I told him man this isn’t going to fly. He said no problem.when he hit the railroad tracks he lost all four tires right out side our yard.

    Reply
  37. Jason E

    I got a 1/2 ton Silverado ( the one thats 2 wheel drive with the 6 cylinder aka. The little truck that can.) You can load it 2000 lbs bed and 6000 at the tongue trailer and fly around doing the speed limit no problems. Ford suspensions are s-h-i-t!

    Reply
  38. Kevin

    I see who the biggest idiots on here are and it’s the ones ragging someone about a college degree!! Your ragging shows a) you don’t read or b) know how to read!! His statement about college had nothing to do with the idiot with the truck but specifying a time in his life (e.g. when I was a Senior in High School I worked at). Maybe you idiots with the Master’s and PhD’s aren’t as smart as you wish you were…morons!!!

    Reply
  39. Jim Craghead

    Seems like there is still a need for F-150’s with an 8′ bed. These new trucks are not “work” oriented. They are ‘real pretty’, just great for back and forth to work, or going camping at holiday inn express.

    Reply
  40. Mike W

    The first big dip in the road will multiply the load, something will break, and he will say, I had a feeling something like this might happen!

    Reply
  41. John

    I’ve driven pick ups under load before & as it was being loaded, at least 2 sets of eyeballs were on the scene checking things over: the fork lift operator & the driver. Usually, there were a couple more people at the scene. All had to agree on what would get loaded before that truck left. Common sense!

    Reply
  42. dorian grey

    Define a holes? The people in this comment section and the author. Youre all a holes.

    Reply
  43. Igor Ivanitskiy

    This looks like a manipulated photo for me.

    Reply
  44. Stan I.

    The weight of those boards is probably below the maximum payload, but it extends beyond vehicle length moving the center of gravity closer to the rear axel. Once front wheels are not under load all the weight of a vehicle and the load is on the rear suspension.
    I loaded older F150 truck with 1.5 metric ton of heavy bricks. The car was heavy, but no issues with stability.
    I also suspect that image photo edited or car suspension was “adjusted’ to look ridiculous.

    Reply
  45. Gary. Brown

    This act had to affect the front end alignment and cause this vehicle to wonder , in other words this kind of overloading would cause a change in the caster and the camber built into the wheel alignment affecting steering as well as tire wear . Very Very dangerous .

    Reply
  46. Bruso, Dodge sales.....ford guy.

    Looks like the weight comes from the 2 by 6 by 12 and the stack of sheet rock…….drive slow you And try not to make a mountain out of a Hill.

    Reply
  47. Ron

    In my opinion, the extended cab is not a true work truck. If you want second row seating or to use your truck as a car, get a car. The shortened bed length places most of the load behind the ideal location for loading. When I first viewed this photo I thought all the sheet goods were gypsum board. This would clearly be way over loaded. I have a 96 f150 eddie bauer long bed with an “add a leaf” in the suspension. I’m not saying that it could easily haul this load, but it would handle it much better than this confused identity truck/car/truck wanna be. HEY FORD!!! GIVE US A REAL TRUCK IN NEWER MODELS. 8 foot bed minimum and scratch the back seat. That’s a truck.

    Reply
  48. Leo

    He is not even using maximum available cargo area. Not even attempting to use the area above the cab. He could easily distribute some of the weight by using this often overlooked area. Geez SMH

    Reply
  49. david

    Ford pushes this BS about what they can haul and tow. They aren’t the only ones but…I drive 50k miles a year and I see people with a 1/2 ton towing 5th wheels. I’ve seen Jeep Wranglers towing 24′ trailers. I have seen more than one Jeep flipped on entrance ramps and seen the ford’s the same way or rear-ended into something.

    Towing is one thing, stopping is something entirely different. None of these vehicles has the stopping power once the brake controller or wiring to it gives out.
    I see lots of people with half tons towing these big wide trailers with no mirrors that they can see around the truck so it’s a Kamikaze move to change lanes period this stuff needs to stop and the police need to write these people tickets for over loaded vehicles

    Reply
  50. Mike

    Ultimately the responsibility is the person transporting load. if you get behind the wheel of an overloaded vehicle of any make model or size you are responsible.

    Reply
  51. Rodney

    Carolina squat??

    Reply
  52. Jack Groshans

    Legal truth. Any employee loading materials for any company, is acting as an AGENT for said company. This issue is NOT who owns the truck. The issue is, did the truck owner load the stuff or did an employee (agent) load the stuff for company. If the employee (agent) loaded the stuff in this haphazard way, the company is liable. This is not rocket science. It is also in every law book.

    Reply
  53. Adventure Junkie

    I was going to be a Dick and post a smartass comment. But it seems like everyone beat me to it.

    Reply
  54. Renzo

    paper Schrader, overloaded trucks get fined and the

    Reply
  55. Adventure Junkie

    Ill leave the useless legal debate to you lawyers. I think the picture says it all, if you have anything to do with loading a truck like this. you’re most likely a dumbass. But we all know that f150 made it safely. The bumper wasn’t even dragging the ground.

    Reply
  56. Dan Pacek

    Who cares what people do you can’t change stupid .Look at the people voting for Biden you just have to walk away and let them be stupid

    Reply
    1. Adventure Junkie

      Amen

      Reply
  57. Rev Fred

    I spent part of my military career overseeing the loading of military aircraft. I understand keep the load within weight limits and center of gravity limits. So do the design engineers for these trucks. I own an F-350 dually to avoid this driver’s problem. Please don’t load your truck as this person did. It puts other drivers around him/her at GREAT risk unnecessarily.

    Reply
  58. Eric Lenth

    None of you should be commenting on anything. Get a job.

    Reply
    1. lee mcfarland

      I’m retired. So we good?

      Reply
  59. lee mcfarland

    My boss had me load up garbage from a warehouse to haul to a dump. Truck was over loaded just like this. As we went across the intersection, the crown of the cross road tossed my front wheels skyward. Hit the brakes gently to bring them back down, and never exceeded 25mph again!!!!

    Reply
  60. Rich

    Pickup truck ads so often show massive loads being dumped into the beds. Of course people are going to expect to be able to do that with their own trucks.

    Reply
  61. B dog

    I’ve owned and driven trucks for 40 + years. Manufacturers know there pick-ups will be abused. That’s why they make them so tough. Just think if it was made by GM/ Chevy it would be behind a tow truck right now. This will get to the job if he’s careful. Love it!

    Reply
  62. Ezra James

    Proper loading and experience driver there would be no problems, but like a few of the comments that were posted there are a lot of idiots that act like they know what they’re doing and don’t and do cause accidents but good point 🧠⚙️⏳🚭📵🏁

    Reply
  63. Rob

    WhistlinDiesel (YouTube) “hold my beer.”

    Reply
  64. kevin Artmann

    i have a 2500 GMC and hauled #4000 lbs of gravel in the box and #4000 on a trailer behind it about 60 miles with no problems my buddy has a f-150 and hauled a #700 motor and the back bumper was dragging and drove like crap

    Reply
    1. Der Miester

      Sounds about right, had 700-800lbs of copper wire directly over my rear axle on my 04 f150 and thought I was going to break a leafspring or shock. Thats all it took to make the rear end lower than the already normally lower front end too 🤣 still waiting to see “Ford Tough” maybe in another 20 years or so.

      Reply
  65. MR

    The most important thing is did he make it home

    Reply
  66. Daniel

    Bunch of quiver lippin ball babies. Go home and suck on yo moms teets some more

    Reply
    1. Howard

      I think we found the owner of the truck in this photo.

      Reply
  67. Malachi

    I’m might be new to the truck environment but that’s just looks like too much to be handled at one time; shouldn’t he just take two trips 🧐

    Reply
  68. Jerry

    “COLLEGE!!!”

    Reply
  69. Dieseldude

    I went to school and majored in 3 subjects math and numbers. I’ve got a 2000 GMC Sierra 2500 and have a capacity of 2550 give or take 100 and recently put around 3500 lbs of shingles in the back and had to drive 60 miles. When I made sharp turns I heard something creaking so I put as many bundles as I could in the back seat and on the floor up front to try and even it out. At least I didn’t hear no more creaking after that

    Reply
  70. Der Miester

    I’ve got a 2004 Ford F-150 extended cab 4×4 Lariat with the 5.4l triton. First Ford I’ve ever had, won’t ever buy another unless it’s a raptor. Transmission lost 4th and overdrive at 106,000 miles, exhaust rusted out almost completely, cruise control used to work then would work here and there and now doesn’t work at all at only 112,000 miles, I’m also only the 2nd owner. I will admit that the beds are a bit taller than I previously thought and even with a flat Leer cap on my bed I can fit quite a bit in there, but I digress. Fuel pump and driver control module went out at 81,000 miles, I did the spark plugs myself with the engine hot since it’s notorious for breaking plugs off in the headers, dual timing chains are an absolute joke, minor electrical mishaps here And there (I’m a Union Electrician by the way). Grinding coming from rebuilt transmission now from a dead stop and especially when turning from a dead stop, loose flywheel now for no reason, eats gas like a fish needs water, lug nuts when tightened to the proper torque love to seize even with nolox on the studs, shall I continue? I will say that this truck has been an absolute nightmare, but for being a ford, it is a decent truck and I’ll have it until I pay it off and can get a newer Silverado. Oh yea and the rear sliding window circuit breaker doesn’t work which is a very common issue. All around I would rate my Ford a 5 or 6 out of 10. If there weren’t so many issues with it I would be more willing to consider buying another newer Ford in the future but I don’t ever see that happening. Spent about $550-600 on ceramic brake pads all around, and new rotors all around, 6 months later, rear caliper on drivers side seized, replaced that along with already worn down pads, fronts somehow still had more pad life left but also had to be replaced 7 months into being new with only 20,000 miles roughly on them. Guess thats how it is though when the damn thing weighs over 3tons!

    Reply
  71. Sam

    Styrofoam 1-2 lbs/ft³ @ 96ft³ (4ft stack of 4’x8′ sheets)
    Pine 22-31 lbs/ft³ @ 88ft³ (4’x10’x12″ + 4’x12’x12″)
    Sheetrock 4’x8’x½” @ 52lbs/sheet, calculating w/ 24 sheets

    3280-4148lbs

    All volumes are estimated by scale of the picture, but that is just the major components of the load

    Reply
  72. Pat Glynn

    I see a lot of people bragging about their Ford trucks here, I was the service manager at Ford dealer for 20 years, all I want to say is they made me a lot of money.

    Reply
  73. T tallmon

    I see this more more everyday the common sense is out the window. If the cops would do their job. We wouldn’t have this on the streets. That’s why we’re in traffic jams for freaking 3 hours.

    Reply
  74. Howard

    Like the bumper would be on the ground if it weren’t for the hitch.

    Reply
  75. Vic

    Biggest problem with the picture of the loaded truck is the weight is past the center of the axle , that is the biggest problem the auto makers have sold John q public 4 door pick u trucks a 8 foot bed loaded with the same load would not look near as bad cause of the extra bed length , but most people are wanting ,or are buying the shorter bed trucks so hauling is out .

    Reply
  76. Mike rollins

    That just goes to show that ford has the best work truck out there I’ve owned many ford trucks up to the f650 dump trucks and bar none there the best for hauling anything I used to haul a case dozer with my 1986 f250 4×4 on a daily basis and plow snow with it in my most expert opinion you can’t beat a ford when it comes to a workhorse

    Reply
  77. Big John

    Gee what fun! Yes the photo is a little alarming, But as long as he has a plan to avoid fulfilling the comments of the first responder above, he sure gets stuff done. Liability issue is avoided by not screwing up! Get stuff done, don’t screw up.

    Reply
  78. Tracy Johnson

    That is so fake everyone with a brain knows a Ford can barely hall it’s self on a good day… Even if you did get a load on it like that it would never make it out of the parking lot unless it was pulled out by a Chevy

    Reply
  79. TimTheToolManTaylor

    Interesting Picture grunt…grunt..grunt

    Reply
  80. Glenn Falzo

    The “F” for this IDIOT means “Fool”!

    Reply
  81. Bill

    Once I put a whole pallet of sackcrete #80 bags on my ram 1500. It’s not just Ford trucks that are tough. As long as your careful.

    Reply
  82. Toxicnut

    Anyone who overloads a truck like that is an idiot. Not even debatable.

    Reply
  83. Bennie

    Does it look like that truck has about a 5 1/2 foot bed? With 8 foot long or more material? Kinda forcing probably 60-70% of the weight behind the axle. Leading to the excessive squat. If he had an 8 foot bed, probably a lil heavy but much more manageable driving. Might be the reason why most contractors have 3/4 or 1 ton on larger trucks to haul materials. Btw. If you really wanna see overloaded. Seen 2 Mexicans up in Pittsburgh PA try to steal a 40,000 pound steel coil from a flat bed trailer with a stolen Nissan pickup. U can imagine how that worked

    Reply
  84. Kenneth A Murphy

    The foam makes it look bigger than it really is, the drywall is 8′ and the lumber is stacked neatly so its heavy, I dont think that its as bad as it seems maybe 2500 lbs maybe but I dont think so, a work truck is made to haul and this should be within limits of a work truck, he is working it as he should, time is money

    Reply
  85. Robert

    A waiver does not exempt home depot or anyone else from liability. A waiver although a legal document is not the law. For example when the station fire occurred in Rhode Island and hundreds of people were burned to death, everybody was found liable despite the fact that the fire was caused by highly flammable foam placed as a sound absorber on the walls and the band using pyrotechnics illegally. Even the bus company, and their drivers were sued for millions just for driving people to the venue. Yes, the bus tickets had a waiver but this means nothing once those responsible have exceeded their ability to pay compensation.
    Furthermore, anyone who loads their truck like this should go to jail. Including anyone who helped load it. Young people don’t seem to grasp the difference between the actual law and a legal document or worse yet, a company policy. A waiver can say anything it wants, it doesn’t make it legal. It takes the courts to decide.

    Reply
  86. Dave

    I think this a BS picture.

    Reply
  87. Dana Sizemore

    Your not liable for others stupidity. If the manager wasn’t around it all the time it took to load, fork lift and all ? The hourly workers are not responsible for corporate/management decisions.+++

    Reply
  88. mike forristal

    That’s why I only buy F250, long beds, with overload packages. I have hauled 5000# in my 2012 F250.

    Reply
  89. Abdur

    I have loaded and hauled loads 15 and 20 miles in my f150 that were so heavy the front wheels barely touched the ground with no problems. Mine must have been for real built ford tough. Some of us expect our truck to haul what we want hauled and with me if it will stay on without falling off load it if you bust something on the truck you fix it ford parts are not expensive.

    Reply
  90. Keith Dorsey

    When growing up in the 60-70’s the old 1955 Ford stepside with 6 cyl 3 on tree. I’d go to lumber yard and fill the bed over flowing with sand – 10 bags of concrete on top. Being a teenage driver I learned not to accelerate quickly or the front tires would come off the ground but I never wrecked it (more than 1 trip). As far as I know the truck is still on the road. Wouldn’t try it in my 2000 F150.

    Reply
  91. Craig

    While I was growing up we had a 1956 Ford 1/2 ton pick up truck. My father and I went to the rock quarry to get a load of driveway stone. The truck was equipped with a six cylinder engine with a heavy duty rear end. Long story short, we left the quarry with 1.5 tons of stone. That stone was taken to another property 70 miles away. Two weeks later dad asked me to move the truck. I heard a clunking noise. The universal joints on the drive shaft were gone. The cost of the repair was $40. Dad griped about the U joints but I never associated the U joint failure with being overloaded until now. This happened around 50 years ago. I wonder if a new Ford 1/2 ton pickup truck would do that today?

    Reply
  92. Gary

    Zak, so if it’s on You Tube it has to be alright to do it? There isn’t ANY pickup rated to haul 50,000 lbs. That’s more weight than a fully loaded semi trailer. You might be able to pull it a couple hundred feet but you aren’t going down the road. If this guy wants to load his truck like that he should have bought a F-250 or F-350 then this discussion wouldn’t be taking place. The college comments from other guys are really entertaining, just LMAO!

    Reply
  93. Scott K

    Hold on here, I see about 4″ between the hitch and asphalt, I think he could throw on a vanity with top still!!

    Reply
  94. Joshua L Tracy

    I’ve had more sheetrock in the back of my Chevy Venture minivan and it didn’t squat near as much. That’s foam insulation on the top, there author. That’s what us rural folks would call a suburb truck…Not for real work.

    Reply
  95. Doug

    To all the educated and not! Yes it is overloaded. What you all have over looked is it’s an F250 3/4 ton may even be a diesel.

    Reply
    1. Chris

      I’ve spent my whole life around and working on vehicles. Before you claim it’s an F-250, check the rims. 3/4 never comes with less than 8 bolt rims. Those Ford rims on the truck never came in 8 bolt. Those 6 bolt rims will never fit on the 8 bolt trucks and the load is way too heavy for the tire load rating

      Reply
  96. Joe

    Some of these comments are as silly as this truck owner.

    I have carried a lot of heavy loads in my ford trucks also with no damage, but this guy is not doing his truck any favors. He is OBVIOUSLY WAY OVERLOADED with a Bunch of 12 foot boards, 10 foot boards, and a bunch of 8 foot drywall.

    The foam boards on top are light, but he should have carried the drywall load on a separate trip.

    Not only is this bad for his suspension, it is Very Dangerous! That F-150 is not rated for that weight, and that truck with that load will take TWICE As far to stop, and having that little weight on the front end will cause it to steer Very Badly!

    If he is going 1-3 blocks at no more than 10 mph, he MAY Be Okay for safety, but the damage to the suspension can/will still happen with that much weight.

    Dont be stupid, make 2 trips!

    Reply
  97. Steve

    Drywall is a pain to haul and handle but genius product still. So much better than all the interior masonry they do in Europe and Mexico, IMHO. I always beef up rear shocks on my trucks just for days like this. #adjustables #coilovers

    Reply
  98. That guy

    Driver and passenger get in.Truck is now a low rider and level. All good to build hot dog stand at truck show.

    Reply
  99. umopapisdn

    This truck was never driven this way. The items were removed from the vehicle after the photo was taken. The whole scene was staged to settle a dispute between two friends. One was convinced that the photo would be dismissed. The other was convinced that people will argue about anything over the Internet if given a catalyst that justifies their feelings.

    Reply
  100. Kevin

    Mama says, “stupid is as stupid does”. Forrest Gump’s mom is right again.

    Reply
  101. John W.

    Wow!
    Who cares????
    All these know-it-alls who argue about idiotic things.
    Silly humans……

    Reply
  102. Jason

    I’ve had my suburban overloaded so bad that I didn’t notice until I hit the brakes that the front end was only intermittently touching the ground… It would chirp and weave all over the place and the tires touched down. There is no reason to haul a load like that though.. And I haven’t done it since. Breaking the axle, ruining the brakes, overworking the trans and permanently bending the leaf springs are just not worth it. At least get a 3/4 ton for Pete’s sake! Or a load leveler airbag system if you’re going to haul that kind of weight

    Reply
  103. Chris

    I work in the transportation industry as a driver. It is the SOLE responsibility of the driver of the vehicle to ensure that his/her load is within the weight limit of the vehicle and is fully secured to the vehicle. If you dont believe me, call any of the DOT offices and ask them. As soon as you are in the driver’s seat, YOU as a driver assume FULL responsibility for that load.

    Reply
  104. Shawn

    Ok scanned through the comments. No one mentioned his receiver hitch jus inches from the asphalt . Bout the time he drags that on the road he will be second guessing his decision . Oh yeah if you want to blame someone , blame DIY TV ! If you have a truck and can program a GPS to Home Depot you can build anything !

    Reply
  105. Bryan

    Wow!!? Where are you supposed to put your beer? Tsk tsk tsk. Now he has to make another run. Seems like a wasted trip unless he was already lit when he was loading up. In that case, do what you do buddy.

    Reply
  106. Bryan

    That boys and girls is why you don’t bring a knife to a gun fight! Morons think a truck is a truck and that is not even true. Hauling that kind weight with a 1/2 ton truck with a short bed is insane. Just like the guy that bought a pallet of OSB at HD and loaded it on the roof of his subcompact car. Tires blew, suspension broke and roof collapsed. He loaded it himself after HD refused and they made him sign a waiver. They even took pictures which came in handy along with the waiver and witness statements. They guy tried to sue but it was thrown out by the Judge. Guess the guy went a bought himself an F150…

    Reply
  107. Stable Genius

    That guy is a Trump voter for sure.

    Reply
    1. Englebert Humperdink

      Wow, went there, eh? Don’t know what you’re talking about. Must be a blatant Libtard afraid of your own shadow. Anyone that brings politics into a discussion like this needs to grow up and move out of mommy’s basement. Oh, and don’t forget to plug in your car so you can make that trip to Target tomorrow to get more tampons.

      Reply
  108. Red Green

    Back in the 80’s I worked at a local lumberyard that starts with “P”. We had a car dealer come in with a new F150 and had us load on 100 yes 100 concrete blocks directly on the paint in the bed. (OUCH!) Let me tell you when this truck left the lot you nearly could not get your fist on your hand under the bumper! Never saw him again….

    Reply

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