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Lincoln Town Car Stretch Limo Caught Towing Boat: Video

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For decades, the Lincoln Town Car stretch limos have shuffled executives to airports and transported kids to prom. But the eye-catching models can apparently do much more than that, as evidenced by a new video showing a Lincoln Town Car limousine towing a boat.

The extremely brief video, embedded below, shows the Lincoln Town Car limo traveling at about 30-40 mph on a three-lane highway, while handling the added weight of the boat and trailer just fine. That’s probably because the rear-wheel drive, body-on-frame architecture used by the Town Car is well-suited for such uses. After all, it’s the same configuration used by the highly-capable Ford F-150.

Now that we think about, perhaps using a body-on-frame limo to tow a boat isn’t such a crazy idea after all. And for someone used to driving such a long vehicle, the added length of the boat probably likely isn’t a very big deal.

The Lincoln Town Car, along with the Ford Crown Victoria and Mercury Grand Marquis, rode on the Ford Panther platform until their discontinuation in 2011. The trio was well-known for their longevity, so much so that law enforcement agencies only recently retired their Crown Victoria-based Police Interceptors.

Though they weren’t known for particularly high levels of performance, the sedans were equipped with the 4.6L Modular V8. In the Lincoln Town Car, that meant owners made do with 239 horsepower and 287 pound-feet of torque, with a four-speed automatic transmission doing the shifting.

Sadly, the Lincoln Town Car owner won’t be able to find a direct replacement should they ever need one, as Lincoln exited the limousine market when it dropped the MKT to make way for the 2020 Lincoln Aviator. That said, it stands to reason that anyone desiring a Town Car could pick up a used model.

In any event, we salute the Town Car limo owner for their unconventional use of the vehicle.

We’ll have more on all things Ford Motor Company and Lincoln soon, so make sure to subscribe to Ford Authority for more Lincoln news and continuous Ford news coverage.

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Written by Edward Snitkoff

Ed owns a 1986 Ford Taurus LX, and he routinely daydreams about buying another one, a fantasy that may someday become a reality.

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4 Comments

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  1. Sadly Ford/Lincoln prefer that a market segment buys an used vehicle or goes to other brands. Sadly for Ford/Lincoln, that will happen. Market is cyclic and those who go to other brands may not come back to Ford/Lincoln when market trends change again. Not everyone likes SUV´s and Crossovers, is willing to buy one or even considers them as luxury vehicles. Lincoln without a sedan (and a limo based on a sedan), is way behind the luxury brands Lincoln intends to compete with. Hopefully Ford/Lincoln stops with the nonsense of killing all its sedans.

  2. How ironic that seeing a car towing a boat rates a video much less a photo nowadays. Standard size six passenger cars were rated to tow 4-5000 lbs- plenty for towing most boats you could put in the water by yourself, or pulling a two axle Airstream.

  3. The Town Car Limousine looking worlds better than the Clown Limousine SUV. I wouldn’t waste my money renting the mess Lincoln want to turn into Limousine today. Lincoln can use the Mustang F150 or Explorer chassis to build a proper sedan for Lincoln and Ford with out braking the bank

  4. Being a chauffeur for over 35 yrs, it was sad to see the phase out of the iconic towncar and the crowne vic. Stretched suvs and crossovers are poor replacements for limousines. They are harder at curbside for clients in wedding dresses and ball growns to enter/exit because of their height. Additionally, entering/existing can be a nightmare for seniors and people with disabilities. It’s sad that it’s unlikely we’ll see the resurgence of the towncar limousine. It’s beauty and utility is missed.

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