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Ford’s Latest Built For America Ad Spot Focuses On Those That Build Things: Video

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Back in May of last year, Ford launched a brand new ad campaign called “Built for America,” which focused on the critical role that manufacturing plays in the United States. Since then, the automaker has released a number of ads under the Built for America umbrella, which covered topics including Ford’s production of personal protective equipment during the pandemic and construction of the new Rouge Electric Vehicle Center, where the Ford F-150 EV will be built.

Now, the automaker has released its latest video in this series, called “Builders.” The new ad highlights Ford’s position as the top assembler of vehicles in America and the largest employer of U.S. hourly autoworkers. It also underscores Ford’s 117-year history and the need for solidarity in the face of change.

“In tough times, Ford and our country have always come together and built things – vehicles, tanks, even relationships,” said Kumar Galhotra, president, Americas & International Markets Group. “This spot shows from our perspective where our nation should focus – on the fixers, the builders, the ones who can bring us together.”

The 60-second piece, directed by Stacy Wall and produced by Wieden+Kennedy New York, initially aired Saturday, January 16th on Fox during college basketball. It will also air on CBS Sports, ESPN, Discovery, and cable channels including Hallmark, HGTV, Nat Geo, The Food Network, DIY, Great American Country, The Science Channel, and Motor Trend Network. Like other videos in the Built for America series, this spot is also narrated by award-winning actor Bryan Cranston.

“Builders” comes on the heels of Ford’s recent public call to action, a piece titled #FinishStrong created by acclaimed filmmaker Peter Berg, known for Friday Night Lights, Patriots Day, and Lone Survivor. That spot, released at the end of 2020, was designed to offer inspiration to Americans doing their best to stay vigilant and protect themselves and others as the COVID-19 vaccine is rolled out across the country.

Ford has been a leader in COVID mitigation efforts since April of 2020 and one of the first manufacturers to pivot toward making personal protective equipment (PPE). To date, Ford has manufactured 55 million masks and will hit 100 million masks for donations by mid-2021.

The company, in partnership with the UAW, has produced tens of millions of pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) to meet strong demand, including 20 million face shields, 50,000 patient ventilators, over 32,000 powered air-purifying respirators in collaboration with 3M, and 1.4 million washable isolation gowns.

Throughout its history, Ford has stepped up in moments of global crisis, including creating iron lungs during the polio epidemic and leading the Arsenal of Democracy in WWII.  Ford’s latest effort builds on the company’s support for those affected by the pandemic, from creating programs allowing customers to defer car payments to transforming its plants to make ventilators.

In collaboration with the UAW and Ford Motor Company Fund, Ford also has donated more than 50 million face masks to nonprofit organizations, state and local officials, first responders, schools, and underserved communities in all 50 states.

“Ford’s strong bond with America continues to grow stronger,” Galhotra said. “We’ll always speak up to let our customers know where we stand – and we’ll always be in their corner.”

We’ll have more on Ford’s Built for America campaign very soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for around-the-clock Ford news coverage.

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Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Mortimer Duke

    “Those that build things”? Like what? Robots?

    If the ads are meant to refer to people, it’s “those WHO build things.” I know you could of done better. 🤦🏻‍♂️

    Reply
  2. Bob Dobson

    So the black population. in the US is 13%, yet every commercial on TV today has to have a person of color in it so we can appease the left wing liberal social justice warriors. Why can’t 13% of the people in commercials be of color so it accurately reflects the face of this nation? Oh Ya I know, because facts don’t matter anymore.

    Reply
    1. Martin

      I completely understand where you’re going but the issues concerning blacks really needs to be front and centre today. There has been too much violence towards the group by the police and when you add in institutional racism, it’s not a pretty picture. I’m in toronto Canada and have worked in advertising. We had a sister company in Nova Scotia reject one of our ads due to too much people of colour. They were absolutely right. Over 90% of the province is white. We got the message and made the recommended changes.
      I think under normal circumstances the ad should represent the people but sometimes small changes are necessary much like the slogan – Black Lives Matter. Yes, all lives matter for sure but often blacks were not included in “All”.
      I hope you understand.

      Reply
      1. 2.7EcoBoost

        If 500 people habitually played with fire on a daily basis, we would naturally expect a higher percentage of those people to end up with burns compared to people who play with fire less. Would we not? Or, we could blame the fire for showing systemic biased. People in general are prejudice. Black people, White people, Hispanic, Asian etc. But, despite what the media and white guilt sympathizers say, America is not a predominately racist country. That is just not true. Obama was elected to two terms. Impossible in a racist country. “Racism” will not go away because the media and certain politicians can not stop talking about it for personal or political gain. You want proof? Look at the political timing of the BLM movement’s in the U.S. There was a strong showing in 2016. Nothing in 17′,18′ or 19′, but during the 2020 election cycle??? BAM!!! Free reign to loot and burn because of “systemic racism”. It’s sad that a race has to become the main narrative every election cycle. It’s sadder that nobody can see how obvious it is. As far as the commercial, I like it. I could care less if the whole commercial was non white. I could care less if Ford hired all minorities, that’s free enterprise. I would hope tho that they would hire the best person for the job. That’s all that should matter.

        Reply
        1. NateO

          Well said, I couldn’t have said it better myself. My longer comment was in reply to Martin.

          Reply
        2. Andrew

          Very well said.

          Reply
        3. Jack

          What did you really expect? If it wasn’t for the lock downs I guarantee that the protest wouldn’t have turned into riots. People were stuck at home for too long and they got a window of opportunity to break free and unfortunately that brought a lot of protagonists along with it. George Floyd was a incredibly rare case where there was a clear video taken and it was pretty obvious what happened in the video. Nothing really noticeable happened in the last three years but in 2020 people had a lot more time to notice things that weren’t right. I live in Minneapolis and a lot of the looters and anarchist were white and took advantage of the moment for their own selfish desires. Sure their were some African Americans but over all anyone who took advantage of that moment in time and disrupted what could’ve been peaceful (even though it was for the most part) are very evil. I’m proud of Ford for addressing that there needs to be change and I’m sure they do hire the best person for the job but I think obviously the thing that’s bothering you is Ford isn’t racist and addresses obvious issues.

          Reply
      2. NateO

        Yes but unfortunately, all the attention is doing more to divide people into groups rather than create greater equality. Unity and equality are based off of attitudes, and attitudes have to come from a persons belief and can not be legislated or forced. To force or over emphasize one part to try to create an equality. Is simply creating another injustice to try to salve the former perceived inequality.

        Reply
      3. Stalkbroker94

        Ah, you’re a conspiracy theorist, I see.
        You do you, Martin, but vague accusations of blanket racism addresses nothing in particular in the hopes of addressing all things in general.

        Reply
  3. Ford Owner

    Ford has a very good video ad showing a F-150 owner building a log cabin with electrical tools powered by the hybrid truck, even using an electric stove cooking breakfast for him and his dog. No other truck can do the same!

    Reply
  4. trailhiker

    We need to start building more microchips (among other things) in the same countries that manufacture the vehicles.
    Global sourcing can save money, but if we lack a back up plan, production can come to a halt.

    Today’s vehicles need so many more chips due to safety and convienience features that were not offered a decade ago.

    Reply
    1. Ford Owner

      There is a shortage because consumer devices such as smartphones and laptops use more chips than autos and gain more profits per sale.

      Reply

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