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Volkswagen Accelerates Its Electrification Plans In Europe

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Previously, Volkswagen planned on electric vehicles accounting for 35 percent of its European sales by the year 2030. However, as part of its new “Accelerate” strategy that the automaker just revealed, Volkswagen’s electrification plans have, well, accelerated greatly, and now it plans on EVs making up 70 percent of its total sales in Europe by 2030.

Meanwhile, Volkswagen’s electrification plans in the U.S. and China include obtaining a market share of over 50 percent for all-electric vehicles by 2030, which would mean overtaking Tesla, which currently controls 69 percent of the market. However, as we saw last month, the launch of the Ford Mustang Mach-E cut into that market share significantly.

Volkswagen has a number of all-electric models either already on sale or on the way in the coming years to help it meet these goals. That includes the ID.3 in Europe, as well as the ID.4, which just launched in the U.S. and China. The ID.4 GTX, ID.5, and ID.6 are all in the works as well. In addition, the automaker is currently developing a flagship electric sedan that rides on its new Scalable Systems Platform, which will launch in 2026.

Volkswagen isn’t the only automaker accelerating its electrification plans in both Europe and across the globe. The automaker’s new partner, Ford, recently announced that it would double its EV investment to $22 billion through 2025, and will sink an additional $1 billion into the Ford Cologne Assembly Plant as it plans to go all-electric in Europe by 2030 – a move that Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess publicly praised.

Ford and VW’s partnership is also expected to spawn a Ford-built mid-size pickup to replace the Ford Ranger and VW Amarok, a VW Caddy-based city delivery van built by Volkswagen, a one-ton van produced by Ford, a new VW Transporter van, and a European Ford EV built on VW’s MEB platform. Altogether, the two automakers expect these joint projects to produce up to 8 million units.

We’ll have more on Ford and Volkswagen’s future plans soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for non-stop Ford news coverage.

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Written by Brett Foote

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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6 Comments

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  1. Don’t give two shakes of a rats rear end about Volkswagen or anything else with electric motors for propulsion, but it’s becoming more obvious that no single manufacturer can build vehicles on their own. Easy Henry. Remember when vehicles were simple and built entirely in house? Sheesh people, it appears we’ve ‘technologied’ ourselves right into a freakin’ corner! Y’all call this progress? These vehicles are so expensive that nobody can afford them, and y’all whine about declining sales. Good Lord, git-a-freakin’-clue.
    All of the battery this and electric that, how’s that working out for y’all, Farley? What an unfunny joke.

    • “Remember when vehicles were simple” – yeah, I remember 1970.
      Sure electric cars expensive – for now. Battery prices continue to fall, but at the moment, those savings are going into increasing range. But once range reaches 350 miles, cheaper batteries will mean cheaper cars. Electric cars are a lot simpler than gas cars: they have about 1,000 moving parts compared to 4,000 moving parts for gas cars. By 2025 they will be cheaper: and when that happens, usage will take off dramatically.

  2. Yes progress. Did you like the 8 track to cassette to cd and vhs to dvd and blueray all to digital thumb drives aka memory sticks to streaming and now cell phones. PROGRESS! If we dont do it they will and we will be MADD MAX and the thunderdome eventually! So hop aboard or be left behind. The thing is if you have good electronics they last forever but if one is defective its a toss up to fix or toss….cars…um no tossing unless its more than 10years old at least. Sad but true.

    • Imanjunk, leave me behind. Mad Max it is. I’ll put a million miles on my diesel powered truck while y’all are looking for replacement batteries and trying to find somewhere to recycle the old ones that are now considered hazardous materials.

      • Well if the product is built right like good phones, dvd players and tvs it will last 10 to 20 years. Recycle is a problem for all the crap we me make down to the plastics and bags that now wound up in the oceans and some beaches!

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