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Washington State Passes Bill With Targeted 2030 ICE Vehicle Ban

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In recent months, a number of countries around the world, including Japan, as well as two U.S. states – California and Massachusetts – have passed legislation banning the sale of new ICE-powered vehicles. Now, Washington state is one step closer to joining that group, as lawmakers passed a bill that aims to impose an ICE vehicle ban by the year 2030.

Washington’s ICE vehicle ban is not set in stone, however, and is contingent on a couple of factors. Those include imposing a tax on vehicle miles traveled, which would help pay for proposed infrastructure, something that President Joe Biden‘s infrastructure plan has purposely left out for now. The bill, which must still be signed by Washington Governor Jay Inslee before becoming law, wouldn’t kick in until three-quarters of the state’s registered vehicles are subject to a road usage tax.

Meanwhile, California’s ICE vehicle ban is scheduled to take effect in 2035 after California Governor Gavin Newsom signed an executive order directing state regulators to develop new regulations to meet the deadline. The plan will not prevent people from owning ICE vehicles or selling them, but it would end the sale of all new gas-powered vehicles in the state.

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced his state’s ICE ban as part of its new decarbonization road map, which aims to reduce emissions emitted from passenger cars and reach net-zero fossil fuel emissions by 2050. The road map also includes plans to expand the state’s public charging infrastructure. In addition to these three states, New Jersey has set a goal of eliminating gas-powered car sales by 2035 as well.

Regardless, these mandates merely ban the sale of new gas-powered vehicles and don’t affect those that are already on the road or sold prior to 2035. Thus, it will be quite some time before ICE-powered vehicles disappear completely from the roadways, if ever.

We’ll have more on the world’s shift toward electric vehicles soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for around-the-clock Ford news coverage.

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Written by Brett Foote

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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22 Comments

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    • Waaaaah, Tater Snowflake.
      You KKKonservatives can just go ahead and wake up to the realities of proven science, anytime you’re ready. America has the Freedom to work for a better, cleaner future for unborn generations, and the Liberty to use our wisdom and common sense proactively today, instead of reactively in 50 years.
      Quit whining your feelings, and get to work on helping solve environmental problems before they become catastrophes.
      Or leave the country, and get out of the way of Americans who love America.

      • You’re clearly a moron. Wouldn’t expect less from your kind. For loving America you communist losers sure are doing a great job destroying it. Don’t you have a riot to get to? Maybe a store to loot? An Asian in to beat?

      • Jingo, please educate us with proven science as to the energy loss associated with the production of electricity in the first place. Does the electric energy fairy magically dispense with the laws of physics when power plants generate electricity? Then, scientifically disprove the huge energy loss in transmitting the electricity. Finally, tell us about the energy loss in converting electrical energy into the mechanical energy necessary to move a car. Just because these physical truths occur in a remote location or you choose to ignore them doesn’t mean they don’t exist. Please learn the difference between a motor and an engine.

        Care to comment on that “email gate” controversy from several years back in which an English university admitted to falsifying temperature data? Anything to say about the infamous creator of the “hockey stick” graph of global temperature increase being outed as a fraud? How about the United States already meeting the Paris carbon reduction goals via increased natural gas usage via fracking? How about France, with all its nuclear energy, NOT meeting its obligation? How about John “Lurch” Kerry admitting that the Paris agreement will do NOTHING?

        A Massachusetts energy official recently was forced to resign after saying that the public (I believe he specifically referenced the elderly on fixed incomes) needed to be “broken.” That’s what this really is about, isn’t it? Bringing America to its knees. Destroying the country. Controlling us. Extracting money from us. Quashing the freedom and independence internal combustion engines afford.

        Since you’re into name calling, you’re nothing more than a useful idiot doing the CCP’s bidding. You love America. Right. Sure you do.

  1. As a car guy (14 classic cars) would it not make more sense to get involved with your legislatures to point out the problems with wholesale outlawing of IC engines, instead of name-calling?

    Jingo Reinhardt, surprised you weren’t able to resist name-calling, assuming you understand it doesn’t help your message. I understand the need for changes to reduce carbon emissions & the need for measures to stop climate change. I suspect the big 4 will make the changes necessary in their vehicle line-ups (assuming consumer acceptance going forward) for state legislation to be unnecessary.

    I’m equally concerned with the problems presented by electric vehicles. Battery disposal given the heavy metals involved, what country controls those metals necessary for battery production(given present tech) are 2 significant concerns.

    Given autonomous vehicles, what jobs do all those unemployed truck drivers, IC mechanics, truck stop employees train? Everyone else negatively impacted by advancing technology needing jobs, what will their jobs be?

    It is a complicated, multi-faceted issue. You must seek to understand both sides, otherwise, you accomplish zilch!

    • Unfortunately, the supposed constituents mean nothing to these pols. They are too busy pandering to the deep-pocket fringes of their large donors.

  2. Don’t let science get in the way of the west coast dope smoking lefty’s BS. The air coming out of the tailpipes of most new ICE vehicles is cleaner than the air everyone is breathing today in CA. Maybe we should also start taking environmental advice from an autistic lesbian teenager who dropped out of college because it was too hard……oh hang on those States already do that. This is yet another reason people are going to be leaving those States in record numbers. By 2030 its likely Texas will have a third of the US population living in the State just to avoid these ridiculous regulations

  3. The world is not moving towards electric vehicles. It’s tree hugging politicians and auto companies that don’t want to lose on their investments. Let the consumer decide. That’s what a free country is all about. Freedom and liberty.

    • I agree 100%. We should not be fighting against each other on this issue. As far as recovering their investments, European automakers have already reduced their workforce well ahead of and in preparation for the ban on ICE vehicles. I honestly believe if Tesla was a flop and China never pushed for electric vehicles, there wouldn’t be all this hype . The Prius would have been an easy route to go vs paying out well past $60k for a pure electric vehicle. Lastly, with all this so called talk from politicians we still do not have a true transportation system on a large scale to offset the ban or the potential lost revenue from it.

  4. Moreover, with autonomous vehicles, what happens to the LEO who’s writing traffic tickets, the missing revenue stream to local governments with no traffic ticket revenue? Ask what % of your local government budget is dependent upon ticket revenue?

    Tree hugger or not, autonomous vehicles are the coming wave & they may well be electric. Young people aren’t car focused, so the transition will be easier for that segment of the populace.

    • AVs are a disaster waiting to happen. Big Brother will be able to dictate when and how you will go to your destination – provided of course, they “allow” you to go there in the first place. Privacy is out the window. It is sad so many people are willing to cede their freedoms because they are too lazy to drive.

  5. The switch over to zero exhaust emissions transportation power plants should be done gradually, just like when the internal combustion engine took over the horse carriage, to become the horseless carriage, then became the automobile. It should not be rushed or shoved down customers throats. The BEV should sell on their own merits, and the battery charging times need to be reduced to 5 to 10 mins for 100% charge not 35 to 45mins for only 80% charge. This is too much time to be at a charging station. They must equally fast as filling up a gas tank. Then I will make the switch, but for now I’ll stick to the ICE age internal cunbustion engine.

    • I agree that getting charging time down to something close to filling a gas tank is the proper objective. But the only time that really matters is on road trips (and it matters a lot). During daily driving, though, it’s not needed since most EV drivers just charge at home or the office.

      Also, the 80% charge on a battery is there to protect its long-term capacity.

    • Exactly. We are trying to get the milk before the cow. Only Tesla has a real charging network, but still small for the US and the charging stations have different charging plugs not a standardized system like Europe. It will take billions of dollars and years to build it. It needs to be done state by state to measure it. If I could afford a hybrid, I would bypass the charging problem. But hey this is the future.

  6. Many countries have already implemented bans on new ICE vehicles by 2030 or sooner (Austria, Belgium, Germany, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, and Sweden). Most automakers see the trend and are responding by transitioning to EVs anyway. Of course if EVs don’t take off or run into development problems then governments will repeal the bans, but the likelihood of that happening is slim since Teslas are still on the road and most appear to be running just fine.

    • Tesla found a niche and filled it. I don’t necessarily see the masses running toward Evs because it has a blue oval or a bow tie on the front end. Is there upside to the EV market? Of course. But the myopic thinking that the entire auto market will willingly embrace an “all electric” future is naive- and deep inside the executive suites they (hopefully) know it.

  7. I am free market guy, but I am also aware that often the consumer doesn’t know there are better options. Henry Ford, himself, once famously said that if he’d asked customers what they wanted, they’d have told him they wanted a faster horse.

    I drive a Mustang Mach E, and it replaced a gas-powered Cadillac XT5. My wife has a hybrid Escape. The Mach E is outstanding as a daily driver – easily the best car I’ve ever owned, and it’s not even close. I don’t have to worry about the gas prices at the pump, my car is always fully charged in the morning (including the cabin being heated or cooled while in the garage), and with Over The Air updates, it’s just going to get better.

    But road trips are a serious pain in the a$$, and I’ve done three of them in the Mach E. For every 150-200 miles, I have to plan on cooling my heels for 45 minutes while the battery recharges. It can be done, but it’s not remotely convenient – and barely practical. The Escape, like any ICE vehicle, is a much better option for those trips. Being a hybrid, I easily gets 41 mpg in combined driving; that’s really good and gives it a “full-cycle” environmental footprint that’s just slightly behind pure EVs. It’s also extremely affordable compared to most EVs.

    For those reasons, I find the “rolling coal versus tree-hugger” debates to be both idiotic and pointless. Neither type of vehicle is perfect, and any attempt to prove either POV to be “the right one” is a stupid effort to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  8. BEV will only sell if people want to buy them …. or to put it another way… you cannot legislate good behavior. Those states, provinces and countries that think the executive office is the way forward to get (or keep) what you want are dreaming. Car manufacturers know this already and suffer fools because of it. This is all made worse by those of us that resort to name calling, and confusing ones right to liberty with the right of everyone to express and make their choices, is doing more harm to our country than it is helping. I am a ICE fan….. The whinners and haters need to get it through their thick skulls that they are not a part of that group, and never will be, if they don’t extend to everyone, the same rights and liberties they claim entitlement…. not just the ones they like or agree with…. that’s what dictators sound like. The market place will arbitrate the future of automotive industry. I suspect the whinners and haters will become irrelevant with time because nobody will want you on their team. Just sayin….

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