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2021 Ford Bronco Data Privacy Policy Revealed In Full

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As the vehicles we drive become more and more connected, they’re also generating more and more data, much of it sensitive and personal in nature. What automakers do with that data is a big concern for everyone, and though most will say that it’s used simply to improve features, others are worried that it can be used in more nefarious ways. So the 2021 Ford Bronco data privacy policy, which Bronco Nation was recently able to view, should be of interest to future owners.

Like every other connected vehicle out there in the modern world, the new Ford Bronco can store a variety of data, both temporarily and permanently. According to Ford, “this data could include information on the condition and status of your vehicle, vehicle maintenance requirements, events, and malfunctions.” Ford can “provide this info to law enforcement, government authorities, and third parties acting with lawful authority or through a legal process.”

According to the 2021 Ford Bronco data privacy policy, the types of data this encompasses is quite broad in scope, including everything from acceleration and deceleration to tire pressure and whether or not the occupants of the vehicle had their seat belt fastened. For example, in the event of a near-crash or actual crash, the vehicle can record all of these factors, as well as others like rate of speed and steering wheel position, for 30 seconds or less.

As far as smartphones go, the Bronco can apparently only store data related to apps that interact with the vehicle, though Ford says that data is “encrypted and only accessible for troubleshooting purposes,” and can be wiped completely from the vehicle using a master reset. When specifically speaking about Apple CarPlay, Bronco Nation quotes Apple’s privacy policy, which says “every app you see is powered from your iPhone rather than by the car. This means that Apple gives only limited metadata to the car to make the experience seamless, and only when that metadata is essential to delivering the service.”

In addition to this data, a user’s vehicle settings can also be stored in the vehicle or on a connected external device. Owners can choose to share this data – which can include things like FordPass Performance app data, radio presets, navigation destinations, and climate control settings – or delete it from the vehicle completely.

We’ll have much more on the Bronco soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for more Ford Bronco news and around-the-clock Ford news coverage.

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Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Hans Kuwert

    The privacy is so high I’ll never know if my bronco is ever built. So many distractions , no warthog , alternate transmissions ,

    Reply
  2. Mike says..

    This is and will be the most significant issue for FORD et al to sort out. Loss of privacy and your rights to privacy is a very slippery slope that is moving all of us toward an AI world. Artificial Intelligence has many applications that will be excellent… it also can become a powerful tool for abuse of individual rights and freedoms while masquerading as a modern day assist. just sayin…

    Reply
  3. royl

    Brett Foote’s article (on this site) regarding the chinese reaction to this type of data being generated/stored by ford is only step one. somewhere along the line the commies will require all that data be sent to the central party. joe and hunter won’t be far behind.

    Reply
    1. Mike says..

      You seem to miss the point (again) …. the interface between cars and computers (data) will be a troubling…. who owns it, how is it used and who can use it. China aside, automotive data mining is a ‘can opener’ for law enforcement, the insurance industry and sales/marketing types. It is happening and it has nothing to do with your amusing commentary.

      Reply
  4. David Dickinson

    Can you rip out whatever is collecting data and have the vehicle still function? What device actually collects and stores the data? The only way to ensure privacy is to ensure the data is never harvested in the first place.

    Reply

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