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Ford North America Will Eventually Transition To All-Electric Lineup

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Earlier this year, Ford’s European arm committed that by mid-2026, 100 percent of its passenger vehicle lineup will be zero-emissions capable, all-electric, or plug-in hybrid and that it will be completely all-electric by 2030. However, Ford North America has thus far refused to set an end date for ICE vehicle sales, citing the unique challenges of the region as the main reason. Regardless, other automakers, including General Motors, have set goals in regards to an all-electric transition, and it seems that Ford North America will indeed eventually electrify its entire lineup as well.

“I can easily see a point where we’d say ‘Here’s the date where we’d be all-electric,” Kumar Galhotra, Ford’s president of the Americas and international markets group, told Automotive News. “We’re certainly working toward it. The two markets are in a very different place. As that market was maturing and moving in Europe, it was clear at that point we’d be all-electric. I suspect the same thing is happening here, we’re just not at that point.”

As Ford CEO Jim Farley noted at the reveal of the automaker’s all-electric 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning last week, it will serve as a sort of litmus test for North America’s readiness to accept EVs. The Lightning’s reasonable price tag and America’s love affair with the Ford F-Series pickup will go a long way in shaping when Ford North America might decide to go all-electric, as will the success of its other EV offerings.

So far, the first EV in the automaker’s newly electrified lineup – the Ford Mustang Mach-E – has enjoyed robust sales. It’ll be joined later this year by the E-Transit, then the Lightning next spring. Ford also has plans to build two additional EV crossovers for North America, though as of now, it isn’t thinking about electrifying the Ford Super Duty lineup. Regardless, Ford’s recently announced plans to open Ion Park – a new battery research and development center – and form a joint venture with battery manufacturer SK Innovation prove that it’s serious about making the move to an all-electric lineup, eventually.

We’ll have more on Ford’s future electrification plans soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for continuous Ford news coverage.

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Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Helen Horton

    Please tell me where the Ford Mustang Mach E is made. How long does it take to build it? Thanks,

    Reply
    1. Ford Owner

      Thrre are several Mach-E sites and forums to get the information you want.

      Reply
  2. Tigger

    Sounds like virtue signaling bull to me. Anyone who tells you what the market will be like 10 or more years out is dillusional. Remember 10 years ago? We Were told that vehicles like the Focus, Fiesta, Sonic and Cruise were going to be the heart of the new car market. Today those vehicles are long gone. Auto execs (should) know what happens when all eggs are placed in one basket.

    Reply
  3. CE

    Unless their new electric vehicles are priced close to ICE vehicles & have similar or lower costs you can count a lot of us out. Not near enough support for distance driving around us for much consideration. Another deal is the cost of replacement parts/batteries. I’ve always had bad luck with batteries, but used to get some warning years ago when one was going bad. Late models now just seem to quit, possibly due to the added electronics. I would have to see some longevity of the batteries in these new vehicles, before I’d consider them even if I could afford one.

    Reply
    1. Tigger

      Not to mention poor resale. Who’s going to want to buy an ev with 100,000 miles on it knowing it’ll cost them $15k to replace the batteries?

      Reply
      1. Ford Owner

        You are both wrong. EVs cost the same or less than an equivalent ICEV , and both Ford EVs are the best examples. As for battery replacement, you are probably thinking about the Toyota hybrids. GM made the Chevy Volt in 2009 yet after 12 years and over 50,000 units sold, only less than ten needed replacements which is covered by the warranty at no cost to the buyer. My own 2014 Fusion Hybrid was built in 2013 yet the battery still runs as new after 7 1/2 years.

        By 2040 there will not be any new ICEVs made, so you must accept the future now or get stuck with gas engines until they break down with no new parts ever.

        Reply
  4. NCEcoBoost

    Better slow WAY down, Ford. Let’s see just how the Mach-E and F-150 Lightnings do long-term, first. Otherwise, you’ll possibly be planning a funeral – yours.

    Reply
    1. Tigger

      It seems that Ford is more into appeasing analysts with EV talk and profit margins instead of offering the best cars and trucks money can buy. Remember the 80s and 90s when this company had good leadership and every product they came out with was a hit? They danced to the beat of their own drum.

      Reply
  5. Bruce Holberg

    They have to talk like this or they’ll miss out on all those yummy government subsidies. Anyone else feeling railroaded?

    Reply
  6. Mick1

    You will need to own 2 cars, Ice and EV until solar charging becomes a reality.

    Reply
  7. Lee

    …and, so begins the end of FoMoCo. Farley’s about to join the growing unemployment line. Adios Jim.
    Henry’s gotta be rolling over in his grave. What a waste.

    Reply
  8. Mike says..

    Do you guys actually read the articles or just look at the pictures? FORD, unlike others, is taking more of a wait and see position in North America. Telegraphing the future product line by a company or for a market region pretty much ignores what consumers will want/accept/buy. Throughout the BEV discussion, FORD continues to follow the market, not GM, or Stelantis….. someone will win big and someone will go home empty.

    Reply
    1. Tigger

      It seems to me that the only company that has been preaching an “all electric future” to now was GM. Now ford seems to be following that mantra weather the customer wants it or not.

      Reply
  9. SloJo

    I’ve yet to see a charging station. Better start working on that infrastructure first.

    Reply
    1. thunder

      exactly! Literally putting the cart before the horse.

      Reply
  10. Timothy Frisby

    Greedy FORD or any other company will not get my business if they go all electric. This move to all electric will cause more pollution not less so this is all about making more money and FORD just like our corrupt GOV, do not care what us peasants think of it.

    Reply

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