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Poll: How Much Would You Be Willing To Pay For An F-150 Electric?

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At this point, the existence of the 2023 Ford F-150 Electric is well known, although exact details about its appearance, feature content, performance, and price have yet to be officially revealed by Ford. While Ford Authority remains committed to bringing readers information about those aspects of the truck as soon as possible, it will likely be a long time before we hear about just how much coin the emissions-free pickup will set buyers back when it goes on sale in 2022.

Ford F-150 Electric

That said, the truck’s cost is still worth discussing, because it will arrive at least several months after the $67,500 version of the Rivian R1T becomes available in January 2022 and roughly one year after the $75,000 Launch Edition goes on sale, provided the company doesn’t suffer any setbacks. And although Ford and Rivian aren’t exactly rivals, these trucks will ostensibly compete against each other, barring some wild price discrepancy or other issue that sets them apart in the minds of truck shoppers.

Ford F-150 Electric

Ford’s prime American competition, General Motors, isn’t resting on its laurels either, as the 2022 GMC Hummer EV will beat the Ford F-150 Electric to market by a substantial margin, provided its late 2021 launch window remains intact. The model slated to launch around that timeframe will boast an eye-popping $112,595 starting MSRP, essentially making it a luxury off-road pickup.

Aside from the Tesla Cybertruck, which has no firm launch date yet, no other automaker is slated to introduce an electric pickup that stands a reasonable chance of actually making it to customers. Considering how the electric pickup segment will look in 2022, it stands to reason that The Blue Oval will likely position its entry as a quasi-luxury model too.

Ford F-150 Electric

That said, Ford has indicated that a fleet variant of the F-150 Electric is in the cards. In that light, it is entirely possible that the automaker could offer a stripped out XL-trimmed retail model that gets by on the strength of its powertrain but exists as a relatively spartan model. After all, there is precedent for such a move, as The Blue Oval currently offers the Ford 3.5L PowerBoost hybrid powerplant on a wide variety of trim levels.

Realistically speaking, that probably won’t happen, and the cost of the battery, which will come from an outside supplier, will likely push its starting price far and above the roughly $30,000 MSRP of a completely basic 2021 Ford F-150 XL. But how much is too much? The PowerBoost-equipped F-150 King Ranch model Ford Authority recently sampled boasted a $76,000 sticker price, and the upcoming 2021 Tremor and Raptor variants will be similarly pricey, at $50,000 and $64,000, respectively. Clearly, there is demand for well-equipped, higher-priced trucks that either pamper their owners or give them some robust off-road capability.

It is not outside the realm of possibility that the F-150 Electric could perform both functions at a palatable price. Ford says the truck will outperform every past F-150 that came before it upon its launch, a claim that would no doubt increase its value, if the company’s assertion is validated. There are tangible benefits to EV ownership too, like reduced ownership costs, that could similarly boost its image among the buying public. Essentially, it stands to reason that a substantial number of buyers would accept a more significantly more expensive F-150 Electric if owning one came with more benefits than drawbacks.

Instead of extending this speculative exercise any further, it’s time we opened up the forum a bit so the wider Ford Authority community can chime in. What would YOU feel comfortable paying for a F-150 electric? Vote in the poll below and elaborate on your desired price point in the comments section. We look forward to reading your responses.

And don’t forget to subscribe to Ford Authority to stay up to date on all the latest Ford F-150 news and continuous Ford news coverage.

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Ed owns a 1986 Ford Taurus LX, and he routinely daydreams about buying another one, a fantasy that may someday become a reality.

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Comments

  1. Philip Pogue

    Hate electric. You can have it. Do you not think batteries don’t put off gases also. Its all just politically correct bs Gas engines will always be better! They use to blame LeadedGas”& R12Freon for the problem, but there’s no facts of global warming! So to me electric a loser and not the answer!

    Reply
  2. Philip Pogue

    I would never buy electric, overpriced junk! Its expensive enough to buy 1 battery.

    Reply
  3. gareth

    Global warming is a reality people that don’t belive need to there head out of the sand!.

    Reply
    1. Dwayne

      you need to get your head out of the sand. the automakers are pushing for it because of their investment. the fruitcakes are pushing because they listen to people with an agenda. do the research. check out John Coleman. he has no agenda. facts dont care about your feelings.

      Reply
    2. Me

      The earth has warmed less than 1 degree in the last century you putz.

      Reply
  4. Ford Owner

    More Luddites here that are against progress. Well, you will all be gone with gas trucks by 2050, so keep contaminating the atmosphere for the next 29 years or less.

    Reply
    1. Bill

      Just because you cannot see the fossil fuel generation of the electricity needed to power an electric motor does not mean that it does not exist. Out of sight, out of mind, right? Could you explain how electric vehicles are so much more efficient when there are the usual combustion inefficiencies in generation, a substantial loss of energy during transmission, and the additional inefficiencies in converting a battery’s chemical energy back to electrical energy and, again, into mechanical energy? We are eager to be enlightened.

      Reply
  5. Greggt

    Not at any price. Neither the infrastructure nor the technology are in place to support it.
    Maybe a little car (if I liked little cars) to run around town in that could be recharged over night in a garage (assuming everyone has a garage)……

    Reply
  6. Thurston Munn

    I would pay ZERO for electric because I will never buy one. Plus climate change is nothing but a political hoax for a power grab and transfer of wealth to those perpetuating it.

    Reply
    1. Blather

      I only want a monthly refund since I’m not contributing to the greenhouse gas hoax or free gas or diesel.

      Reply
  7. Gringo

    Long way to go with the technology that will make fully electric trucks
    A reality.

    Reply
  8. Randy

    Electric motors at the wheels make sense, but batteries don’t. Put a generator behind a gas or diesel motor, or even hydrogen power, like a locomotive and then you have something! You get an efficient power train and the convenience of long distance travel.

    Reply
  9. Lee

    Y’all couldn’t PAY ME to drive one of those unsafe, battery operated, polluting pieces of junk.
    I see Ford Owner is still revealing his/her(?) intelligence by name calling anyone that has a point of view that differs from his/hers(?).

    Reply
  10. Michael "Pappy” Harvey

    I’m reading all these reply’s while laughing aloud. Leaving out Climate Change, let’s talk about “Cost of Ownership”, which at the end of the day is the most important issue for all of us. If the starting price of EV were equal to ICE, I most definitely would go for the EV. I have my own fuel supply via Solar, I won’t be paying for elevate fuel prices (both electricity and fossil). Our Government controls the cost of both these items as with the current 30% increase in gas in my area. Climate Change activist are demanding the energy sector to go Solar, Wind or some other “Green Energy” method. Who the hell do you guys think is gonna pay for that? Ford has the industry beat in Quality and has done so for several years. Ford… go ahead and build that EV, I’m all in but I can’t afford no $70k for no truck. PS. Just purchased the XLT F-150 Powerboost Hybrid ($12k less than the Lariat), looking for lower cost of Ownership. 24/25mph sure beats the 14mpg I was getting from my 2018 6.2l F-250

    Reply
    1. carnut1978

      Hi Pappy, I bought the F150 XLT Hybrid also in late March. I have only had to fill once. Almost to the end of my second tank with little over 1000 miles so far. I’ve been pretty gentle with it. I’m getting 21 mpg on both tanks. How is yours doing? I was hoping for closer to the advertised 24.

      Reply
      1. Michael "Pappy” Harvey

        Got 26 on the first tank traveling back from the dealership, 548 miles. 16 on the second tank but I was pulling a trailer with a utv on it up to Silverton, CO. Plenty of power/torque pulling the trailer, more than my 6.2 F250 had, at least it feels that way. I’ll be happy with the 24, beats the 14 the 6.2 was getting.

        Reply
        1. carnut1978

          OK, thanks. I guess I can hope for better. Mine was built the last week in March before they announced the semiconductor shortage. Makes we wonder if it got left out and does it have anything to do with mileage? I understood they were leaving some of these chips off GM trucks and shipping them anyway, saying mileage would be affected about 1 mpg.

          Reply
  11. Joseph Beno

    What ever happened to the good old days. When a pickup was a pickup. Now there spaceships. Why in the world would you need half the junk they put in these trucks. I would never buy a electric truck. Can they aggressively go off road can they forge 12″ of water ?? So you can guess what I would pay . ZERO

    Reply
    1. Blather

      Ask for free gas or diesel vouchers the entire life of the truck since you are helping Al Gored and his hoax.

      Reply
  12. Tom

    How much MORE would I pay? The real question should be how much less should the electric version sell for! Why should I pay one cent more? Name one thing it does better.

    Reply
  13. Al Zito

    Wrong survey question, The question should read:
    How much MORE would you pay for an electric F150?

    My personal answer, not one penny.

    Reply
  14. Saundra

    No electric truck for me at any price. Not interested at all. Not even for free.

    Reply
  15. Greggt

    Cost of ownership an issue….LOL!!
    Anyone willing to pay $50,000 to $70,000 for a pick-up truck is not too worried about “Cost of Ownership”!

    Reply
    1. Ron B

      What cost of ownership are you feeding to? Yes I paid $60k for my Mach E, but history has shown that EVs have significantly less breakdowns compare to ICE vehicles. There are only a handful of parts in an electric motor and the battery is guaranteed for 10 years. So not really seeing your ownership costs here.

      Reply
      1. Greggt

        I wasn’t the one touting the cost of ownership, obviously you are not too worried either paying 60K.

        Reply
    2. Michael "Pappy” Harvey

      Sorry you don’t understand the “Cost of Ownership”. I’ll try to explain my point differently. It all has to do with;
      1) what can you afford and
      2) how long you can afford to keep it.

      Some people can afford $50-$70k vehicles, obviously you can’t, or you wouldn’t have made those comments. But that’s OK! You buy what you can afford and you keep it as long as you can afford to. Someday, all vehicles become “Cost Prohibited”, to continue to operate. That’s when it’s time to get rid of it and get something else.
      I commend the guy with the Mach E and the F150 plaid, obviously he’s done something right in life, maybe just maybe, he has put a lot of thought into “Cost of Ownership” in most everything he purchases? I don’t know, but the guy has more money than you or I. GOOD for Him! The old saying is; “He who dies with the most toys wins”.

      Reply
  16. Ron B

    My wife has Ford Mach E that we actually love and I have a 21 F-150 Platinum hybrid that I love also. However, if that new electric F-150 comes out I will surely buy it if it stays around my $75,000 range I paid for my current 150. Whether you believe in climate change or not, you can’t beat how cheap it is to charge an EV. My Mach E cost me less than $9 to charge from home from completely empty to 90%. And taking a 1,000 Mile Road Trip in it only delays my trip by about 2 hours for charging. If the F-150 EV can get at least 450 miles on a charge, I will definitely trade in my truck for that. Paying $12 to charge my truck versus the 70 plus dollars that it takes me currently to fill my truck up is a no-brainer. The only other part I needed to have is to be able to tow at least 6,000 lb for my boat.

    Reply
    1. Jake

      1, you paid 75K for an F150???? are you out of your mind?
      2, you need to be making money on charges, not spending to reclaim the costs, as it will take you more than the life of the vehicle to make up for the mach E
      3, 9$ a refill? thats what i put in my car once road taxes are taken out. Increased EV taxes are coming as the nation average of gas is half in taxes…. so 18$ to fill up… about the same as my car.

      Reply
  17. James H

    Seems as though Ford is sending out “feelers” so they will know how much to charge for an electric F150 the same as they do with ever increasing MSRP’s on all their vehicles. $60 or $70 K for an F150 is ludicrous. I quit buying them because of that. They are cash cows for their business. When you can buy a new F150 for $10 to $15000 or more off MSRP , H E L L O. What does that tell you?????

    Reply
  18. blksn8k

    If I were to buy a new F-150 it would probably be one with the PowerBoost drivetrain, not a full EV. I live in a rural area where charging stations are pretty much non-existent. And, if there is a power outage the PowerBoost with the optional generator could run my house. With a full EV I’d be SOL. Anyone who thinks electricity is pollution free is dreaming. At this point in time there are no alternative means of producing enough electricity to replace that generated by burning fossil fuels or using nuclear energy. And once all vehicles are electric powered the demand will be even higher. The environmental impact of producing the equipment to generate “clean” electricity is also not zero. Yes, climate change is real. It’s been going on since the dawn of time and will continue long after the last human being has taken their last breath.

    Reply
  19. Ken

    Never!!! Have Fun Getting Rid of the Batteries when they PUKE!! O, that’s right I’am sure they have that figured out??? “RIGHT”??? Just like the Frozen Windmills in TEXAS? Ya the F-150 On board generator helped power some houses, and That was Fantastic! But a Full Electric???? NOPE. NOT ME! It has no good Distance or Long Driving Range and the Expense is gonna be Hugh!!
    You can Keep your Electric Garbage!
    I wanna make it to my destination without having to Stop 1/2 way and Rent a Hotel Room whilst my Truck is “Charging” It power source!!! Na, don’t think so!!!!

    Reply
    1. Ron B

      You obviously have no education on electric vehicles. When on a road trip you can fast charge your electric vehicle from 5% to 80% in about 25 minutes. I’m taking mine to TN from North Texas. Charging only adds 90 minutes to the trip.

      Reply
  20. scorpionking0102

    If Ford is the make the all electric F150, cost is definitely going to be a price point.
    This is my take on EVs, and I’m sure I’m not on the fence alone. Most vehicles are “globally sourced”. EV battery production, as well as this issue with the chip shortage, should be brought to the USA in order to help control with supply shortages and help the economy. That being said, unfortunately if it does, it’s not going to take place “seismically”.
    Ford/Lincoln put in place a while back where the cost of a hybrid vehicle was the same as the ICE vehicles. In order to appeal to buyers wanting to go with the EV power train, not to mention pull buyers from other EV vehicle makers, have the same incentive for the F150. And for all you “tree huggers” out there, do your research before bad mouthing buyers of ICE vehicles. The damage to the environment sourcing the raw materials to make the batteries as well of recycling the end product, also comes with blame. If vehicle manufacturers would put all the effort into making hydrogen powered engines as they are putting into the EVs then pollution risks would be minimized. BMW is working on this technology, so why hasn’t vehicle manufacturers pushed back and adopted this technology? It goes to 🤔.
    People who think they are going “greener” reminds me of when so called “environmentalists” went to these dealerships and set fire to big SUVs and other “gas’s hogs”. What the hell were they thinking, the burning of those vehicles made the environment cleaner?
    So stop trying to be “politically correct” on this matter and think outside the box for a change.
    “That’s my story and I’m sticking to it”.

    Reply
  21. Hookman

    I’ll get excited about electric vehicles when the energy generated to power them is from renewal sources like solar, wind, hydro or nuke. As it is now, the energy can is simply being kicked down the road from the gas station…to a coal fired power plant.

    Have to LOL at the folks that choose to put a right-spun media sack over their heads when it comes to climate change. 30min of searching through -honest- data will show the undeniable photos of its effects, and the destructive trends that are so troubling.

    Reply
    1. Greggt

      You must have missed the fact that it is China and India that are the major world polluters. In the Paris Agreement China does not have to even address it until 2025. Meanwhile it is adding coal fired plants to generate electricity.
      Go ahead and save the world with your EV, I’ll stick with my ICE vehicles.

      Reply
  22. Charles M Ernst

    I must have missed it? Did Hell freeze over? Cause that’s the only way I would buy an electric vehicle. I guess the sheeppeople must have missed the story about people in California who
    could not escape the fires because their electric vehicle did not have enough charge to make it out.

    Reply
  23. Rick

    I would not buy any electric vehicle. Too many reasons to mention all, but poor range and big time hassles getting charged are at or near the top of the list. Maybe someday, but that day is far in the future.

    Reply
  24. Lariat Lover

    Would not pay for an electric F-150.
    Don’t want a pure electric vehicle of any kind.
    Do love my 2021 F-150 Lariat with the 3.5 L Eco-Boost and 10 speed transmission.

    Reply
  25. royl

    86% of all greenhouse gases are produced OUTSIDE of the U.S., when you’re told to follow the science, then follow it. China and India, along with the rest of the world go “electric”, then there may be something worth discussing, but to think, if the U.S. stops 100% of all our greenhouse emissions this will solve any problem with the amount of carbon in the atmosphere, you are an idiot. The old F150’s, millions of them, in the south and west of the U.S. were built Ford Tough. They generally had V-8s, and just keep running. Huge numbers of people still have an old F150, they may own and drive many other vehicles, but they keep the ford, for hunting, fishing, driving the property etc. Those fords were built in the U.S. in different times, when things were built to last. On this very site, one can read about ford’s 4 banger engine problem, and how much ford doesn’t care if they sold you a piece of crap. This same thinking will go into their [ford’s] new electric-ford and their chinese parts plants are not the same ford that built all those old f150’s that keep going, not even close.

    Reply
  26. Jim Glass

    Most lariat trucks run in the 50-60k and a EV truck given a range of 300 miles would be the value champ. Personally I think the truck could mirror the pattern of the Mach E. That is a base truck in the 40-45k range. A Premium might fall in a range of 45-60k depending on options.

    Reply
  27. WAYNE

    GLOBAL WARMING IS THE BIGGEST HOAX OF THIS CENTURY. THE EARTH IS ALWAYS CHANGING . LOOK AT THE ICE AGE WHAT MELTED THE ICE BACK THEN WHEN WE HAD VERY FEW PEOPLE, NO CARS, NO CATTLE. THE EARTH IS ALWAYS CHANGING. IF IT TILTS OFF ITS AXIS JUST A 1/2 DEGREE IT CAN CHANGE THE WEATHER PATTERN.

    I BOUGHT A NEW F150 POWER BOOST ONLY BECAUSE I WANTED THE EXTRA HORSEPOWER FROM A STANDING START. WE HAVE NO INFRASTRUCTURE FOR CHARGING, BATTERIES GIVE OFF GASES AND THEY NEED TO BE REPLACED MORE OFTEN THEN THE MANUFACTURERS SAY. THEY ARE EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE. YES ELECTRIC CARS ARE FAST, BUT I WANT DEPENDABLE TRUCKS.

    Reply
  28. Gambit

    I live on the edge of civilization and with my age I’ll never buy an electric car.
    If you work in the resource industry in remote areas how would you charge a battery. How many batteries do you need for a truck hauling heavy freight or equipment for 500 miles in the mountains or on winter ice roads?
    How would you fuel planes and earth moving equipment? Oh I forgot everyone is going to be a computer programer.
    How can they replace deisel fuel? Trucks will be using diesel or gas hybrid for a very long time.
    Electricity is too expensive, cars should be powered with water. So if there is flood or high winds and you lose power then what do you do?
    What happened with the hydrogen powered cars that use water?

    Reply
  29. Ron B

    I totally agree with most of your post except for the electricity is expensive. Unless some new technology comes around there will always be a need for diesel fuel and jet fuel. However, Electric vehicle charging is way cheaper than gas. I charge my electric car from 0 to 100% for about $9 and 300 mi of range. My F-150 cost me $80 for 550 mi of range.

    Reply
  30. snowpatrol

    you need to have an option of, ” will not buy an electric vehicle”. then i will vote !!

    Reply
  31. Bo lane

    That’s right. I voted the least price that was listed. But I’m with you , there should be another choice of 0 and $25,000 and below. Heck these vehicles are way too expensive now. I believe they are “fishing “ to see what or how much their customers would go. Not here for any of that political junk !! And that’s all the fear mongering is about with climate change and crap. Just nonsense.

    Reply
  32. Steve

    EVs are only for stuck up rich people that think they are saving the planet. The electrical grid is not robust enough to handle millions of new EVs. Nuclear, hydro, gas and coal powered plants would be needed in order to meet the increased power consumption needs. Good luck with windmills and solar power. Look at what happened to Texas this last winter. This is all common sense, right? But for some reason we are headed down this dead end road.

    Reply
  33. Me

    Not one penny. Liberalism is a mental disorder

    Reply
  34. Ron B

    What happened to Texas this year was the complete fault of the Texas Energy Grid Crooks. They were told every year to winterize their equipment and never did. You don’t see other northern states power plants and windmills go down because they winterize them. Texas figures it will be okay because we don’t get harsh winters until it happens, the second time in 10 years. I spent 3 days with no power and my solar panels are tied to the grid and won’t work when the power goes out.

    Reply
  35. philip tilley

    Why can’t they make them like the Lamburgini (sorry) recharges as you drive it.

    Reply
  36. blksn8k

    There is a wind farm not far from my home here in the northeast with about fifteen windmills. At last count six of them were down for maintenance. They don’t run on pixy dust, or do they? As far as powerplants, most of the fleet are outdated and need to be replaced or upgraded but the utility companies are not allowed to do that because major upgrades are considered to be an extension of their lifespan and that simply can’t be permitted any more than they are allowed to be replaced. Not in today’s political la la land environment. Liberals make decisions based on emotions, not common sense, facts or logic.

    Reply
  37. Gerard

    At a maximum, I would not be willing to pay any more than the current asking price of the F-150 at their respective trim levels: what justifies a price above the current levels? They are less complex, therefore CHEAPER to build/produce now and even more so as the batteries become cheaper and a commodity. Do folks really believe charge at home will remain cheaper that at the pump? Only until electrics are a majority over the gas models: then watch out. Until an electric F-150 has the equivalent range of a 5.0 gas version there is no reason to buy one. Greenhouse gas reduction? You’ve replaced the tail pipe with the power plant. Good luck when we get a stretch of cold cloudy weather. The push to electrics is a Corporate bag job scam.

    Reply
  38. Michael "Pappy” Harvey

    Working on spreadsheets trying to justify the purchase of an EV when I just realized there are no good ways to justify the purchase of ANY vehicle. So… walk, ride a bike, skateboard, rollerblade, ski? Anything but buy something you can’t possibly justify it’s purchase. Everything is just too damn expensive today. Hey Ford, did ya hear that, you charge too damn much for all your stuff. Everybody is working from home now so we don’t need to go anywhere. Pandemic got everybody scared to travel, so we don’t go anywhere. Climate Change activist got all worked up the Worlds gonna end in 30-50 years, so we all don’t LIVE anymore. We just stay home and be scared all the time.

    Reply
  39. Raptor

    You would have to pay me to drive a battery powered toy, fuel cell makes a lot more sense in a truck.

    Reply
  40. NCEcoBoost

    Nothing. EVs are not anywhere near ready for prime time.

    Reply
  41. Adithya Ramachandran

    To be competitive in the marketplace, I’d say it needs to be around $55K before tax credits to start, which means basically anything above the XLT will have an electric option.
    That said, I’m not the target market for a truck buyer. I’m a white collar guy who is more interested in a plug in crossover like the Mach E or Corsair Grand Touring to replace my hybrid sedan. I like the idea of charging up when I’m asleep.

    Reply
  42. Mr Gary

    Sounds like to me that on long trips one would stop to eat while there vehicle is charging. And just remember once E vehicles become more abundant on our roads and they will! Gas prices will come down probably Way down.

    Reply
  43. Ron B

    You are partially correct in that electric battery manufacturing uses 15% more carbon than a ICE during the manufacturing process. But that’s where the similarities end. Over the complete lifetime of an electric car compared to a ICE car, the electric car wins out by a wide margin. When you factor in all the gasoline, oil usage and other liquids that are needed, the electric car needs none of those and therefore very little carbon emissions except during the charging process. The US mostly has cleaner burning electric plants. . Electric car batteries are also recyclable and turned back into batteries again for another electric car. This does use a little bit more carbon footprint to do that, but not as much as I’d used during a the mining state of a brand new battery. But over the whole lifetime of an electric vehicle compared to an ICE vehicle there is anywhere from 40 to 64% less carbon used depending on the ICE vehicle used.

    You and all other electric vehicle haters don’t have to like Electric vehicles. You’re not made to drive one, so it really doesn’t matter what your stance is. If you don’t like them fine, but a lot of other people do and would buy them when the prices go down. I personally like not having to go to a gas station every week, and especially that you won’t find a faster vehicle out of the start from what you get from an electric vehicle unless you pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for a high-end sports car to match an electric vehicle.

    Reply
    1. Currybob

      Lithium batteries which are the current battery of choice, are not recyclable. This is one reason I will be waiting on the solid state battery system. Don’t forget about our weak power grid also.

      Reply
  44. Ron B

    I wouldn’t count on a drop in prices by the time that comes around because only a third of all oil produced is used for gasoline. The rest is used for the vast many of other things that need oil to run. Secondly, many vehicle manufacturing companies are mostly stating they are going to eliminate carbon-based vehicles in the future. And lastly, a study was done that stated that with much of the world switching over to ev’s that there will almost certainly end up being a carbon tax put on gas consuming vehicles to try and deter people to switch to cleaner Electric cars.

    Reply
  45. MMC

    Never !!! Id sell it if I won an electric vehicle ..Id NEVER buy one !! LOVE Ford products n vehicles; I would buy nothing other than a Ford .Buy American made products… Go America protect what is OURS !!!

    Reply
  46. JeremyK

    Rivian can ford 3′ of water. Battery back, motors, connectors area are all sealed. EVs make a lot more sense in water than something that requires air to run/breathe.

    Reply
  47. John Q Public

    New vehicles are already priced too high

    Reply
  48. Currybob

    I’m very interested in an electric truck but I’m waiting for the solid state battery pack system to be in one before I do. Cheaper, faster charge, lighter, longer range and much longer battery life.

    I currently have a PowerBoost and love it. The option was around $2500 more in my King Ranch. With possible government tax incentives of up to $7,000, I would say $7,000 for the all electric version.

    My biggest question is can our current power grind handle a big jump in electric automobiles. If everyone is charging their electric vehicles, that would be a huge increase on the electric grid demand. Current demands in some area’s are not capable now much less if you add a huge increase for charging auto’s.

    Reply
    1. JeremyK

      Regarding the grid…Most EVs charge at night, off peak, which by definition means a time of EXCESS capacity. There is a LOT of excess grid capacity at night. My smart thermostat is already smart enough not to run during times of a potential brown out. EVs will be the same. There is plenty of time for areas with weak grids to make improvements before EVs come close to affecting grid reliability.

      Reply

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