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Canada Sets 2035 ICE Ban For New Cars And Trucks

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In recent months, a number of countries around the world and a couple of U.S. states – California and Massachusetts – have set end dates for the sale of new internal combustion-powered vehicles. For now, it doesn’t appear likely that the U.S. will follow suit, even though a number of senators have asked President Joe Biden to consider a 2035 ban. Regardless, Canada has become the next nation to set an ICE ban, as the country has decided to ban sales of new gas-powered cars and trucks beginning in 2035 as part of its plan to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, according to Reuters.

“We are committed to aligning Canada’s zero-emission vehicles sales targets with those of the most ambitious North American jurisdictions,” said Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson. “We will work with the United States to harmonize fuel efficiency regulations and we’re investing in consumer rebates, charging stations, business tax breaks, and industry transition costs.”

As Ford Authority reported back in May, EV sales in Canada have risen considerably over the last few years, but still represent just 3.52 percent of the overall market. However, it’s expected that by 2023, a total of 130 new EVs will be on sale in the country, including the recently-revealed 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning and Ford Mustang Mach-E, the latter of which is already on sale there, as well as five new electric Blue Oval models set to be produced at the Ford Oakville Assembly Plant.

Regardless, the Canadian government still has a number of obstacles to overcome. As Ford Authority reported back in May, a recent study found that many Canadian car shoppers are hesitant to purchase electric vehicles for a variety of reasons. These include range, higher prices, lack of infrastructure, and charging times – many of which have been echoed in separate studies conducted with European and American car shoppers.

We’ll have more on the future of ICE vehicles soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for non-stop Ford news coverage.

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Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Mark L Bedel

    Well, maybe by then we’ll have some of the niggling problems figured out with the batteries and the charging station networks…

    Reply
  2. John

    All concerns about the readiness of the EV market by then set aside, isn’t the whole point of this legislation to supposedly combat climate change? But the climate alarmists are already predicting doomsday before then. So what’s the point of this new ban if we’ll all allegedly be dead by then? Tells me it’s not really about fighting climate change. Something more like centralized power.

    Reply
    1. Tigger

      Even if you were to take all ICE vehicles off the roads and replace them with EVs today, the impact on climate would be negligible.

      Reply
      1. Bob Dobson

        So very true, this whole mantra “ICE CARS ARE BAD” we must get rid of them……so not true…..look at the carbon footprint of China and India then we can talk reduction of ICE cars.

        I also love how we just turn a blind eye to the carbon footprint of mining lithium which is required for batteries……also we ignore legacy batteries and battery disposal……sssssshhhhhhhh we don’t talk about that bad stuff.

        Reply
        1. John

          Exactly. Besides, ICE cars are becoming more and more fuel efficient by the year……

          Reply
    2. Stephen Ketterer

      Confirms my hunch that it’s all based on a fairytale.

      Reply
  3. Colton HENDLEY

    I fill like it’s kinda dumb if they wanna do that they need to make electric vehicles cheaper not everyone can afford an electric brand new vehicle cause they are pricey that just my opinion

    Reply
  4. Stephen Ketterer

    I will be all for EVs, when:
    • Range is over 400 miles across the board
    • Charge times drop below 10 minutes
    • Initial costs drop to where ICEs are

    Reply
  5. Steve

    I want to know how many nuclear power station need to be built to build all these power stations. AND….. how much petroleum is needed to make the plastic for all these batteries? These government officials are just plain stupid, seriously, moronic. Charge times will never be faster than just filling up the tank. Never will these silly stupid battery cars have a range near what a real car will have. My Ford F- 150, 460 miles on 1 tank. I can drive from east coast to west coast in a couple of days, if need be. These silly stupid EV cars, it would take a week. Drive 250 miles. Stop and 30 minute charge. 250 miles, 30 minute charge. Oh what a fun vacation that would be. IDIOTS, all of them IDIOTS, and the people that buy these cars, IDIOTS… According to my last emission test that was done on my truck, I passed with all stars. My truck runs super clean. Idiots, all idiots….

    Reply
  6. steve

    Tell you what, you really want to bring down emissions, you government hack waste of skin??? Horse and buggy, ride a bike, bring back the Fred Flintstone vehicle. No batteries, no petroleum. No plastic, no petroleum. Oh, buy the way, how are you government hacks going to pay for all the additional road work repairs? These stupid EV vehicles weigh more than your real vehicle. More weight, more damage, more asphalt? More petroleum.

    Reply
  7. SmartPerson

    It’s less about limiting carbon footprint and more about government control. The government wants to control everything and they’re using the environment as an excuse.

    Reply
  8. Jean-Francois Rivard

    Agreed, it’s about Government control, especially in far left Canada. (I can say that, I’m Canadian) the politicians say: Hey, if it works for the UK, it’ll work for us right? Except that England is 874 miles long, the longest one way driving distance in Canada is 4,860 miles. Not quite the same amount of ground to cover.

    Canada, like the US has long and wide sprawls. In the Canadian prairies (Mid west) provinces like Saskatchewan your next door neighbor can be several (Dozens of? ) miles away, charging facilities in Saskatchewan outside metro areas? Forget about it… Glad I live in the US, poor fellow Canadians.

    Reply

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