mobile-menu-icon
Ford Authority
Sponsored

Ford F-150 To Drop 3.0L Power Stroke Diesel Engine: Exclusive

Sponsored

The Ford 3.0L Power Stroke V6 will be dropped from the F-150 lineup in the near future, Ford Authority has learned. The engine, which first debuted on the 2018 Ford F-150, likely got crowded out by the other engines in the current lineup, with most being members of the EcoBoost family of gasoline turbocharged powerplants.

2021 Ford F-150 Powertrains
Engine 3.3L Ti-VCT V6 2.7L EcoBoost V6 5.0L V8 3.0L Power Stroke diesel V6 3.5L EcoBoost V6 3.5L PowerBoost V6
Power (horsepower @ RPM) 290 @ 6,500 325 @ 5,000 400 @ 6,000 250 @ 3,250 400 @ 6,000 430 @ 6,000
Torque (lb-ft @ RPM) 265 @ 4,000 400 @ 3,000 410 @ 4,250 440 @ 1,750 500 @ 3,100 570 @ 3,000

Assuming Ford doesn’t axe any additional engines from the F-150 lineup, that would leave the truck with four different options, aside from the standard Ford 3.3L Duratec V6. Ford likely decided to ditch the oil burner for several reasons. For starters, its output lagged behind the Ford 3.5L EcoBoost V6 and the Ford 3.5L PowerBoost V6, although it still boasted quite a bit of torque at the low end. Additionally, the newly available hybrid powertrain brought some intriguing efficiency gains with it, as the EPA rated the new powertrain at 24 mpg combined city/highway with four-wheel drive. By contrast, the diesel is rated at 23 mpg combined with four-wheel drive.

Consumers also don’t have much incentive to opt for the Power Stroke when buying a 2021 Ford F-150, either, as it is currently $500 more expensive than the 3.5L PowerBoost V6 hybrid throughout the lineup. But perhaps the biggest demerit against the diesel is the unavailability of certain options. For example, the 36 gallon extended range fuel tank could never be paired with the engine, nor could Pro Power Onboard. The latter system is optional on every EcoBoost engine and standard on hybrid models, and as Ford Authority previously reported, it was a lifesaver for residents of Texas when the state was slammed with extremely severe winter weather.

While the Power Stroke’s time may be up, that doesn’t exactly mean the gasoline EcoBoost engines can rest easy, as the 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is right around the corner. At some point, it stands to reason that all variants of the F-150 will switch over to battery electric power.

In any event, we’ll have more on this development soon, so subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford F-150 news and ongoing Ford news coverage.

Sponsored

Ed owns a 1986 Ford Taurus LX, and he routinely daydreams about buying another one, a fantasy that may someday become a reality.

Subscribe to Ford Authority

For around-the-clock Ford news coverage

We'll send you one email per day with the latest Ford updates.
It's totally free.

Sponsored

Comments

  1. Alexander

    Seems like dumb move. Ram and Chevys diesels have gotten a lot of media praise and people seem to be receptive towards them

    Reply
    1. Wolfman

      Ram & Chevy will follow right behind just like they did with aluminum hoods, doors and tailgates. Follow The Leader.

      Reply
  2. crabbymilton

    Well, they already dropped the diesel option in the TRANSIT even before one was even built so perhaps as the article states, FORD is moving away from Diesel in the light range. Time and the market will determine if they made the right decision or not.

    Reply
    1. Samuel Hofer

      Those engines did not last–that’s why they were taken out of the transit vans.

      Reply
      1. Crabbymilton

        Well they replaced that 5 cylinder that was known to be bad with a 2.0L turbo 4 Diesel that was pitched to be quieter and more powerful but that one never saw the light of day.

        Reply
  3. jerry w guess

    seems like a bad idea to drop the diesel from the line-up , kinda reminds me of the way polaris promoted the victory motorcycle brand ,which was not very much , don’t see much about the diesel but i have a 7.3 diesel and they pull great, i would like it if i were in the market for a new truck

    Reply
  4. Tigger

    “While the Power Stroke’s time may be up, that doesn’t exactly mean the gasoline EcoBoost engines can rest easy, as the 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is right around the corner. At some point, it stands to reason that all variants of the F-150 will switch over to battery electric power.”

    Not in most of our lifetimes….

    Reply
    1. John Tagasian

      You plan to Die in the next 10 years?

      Reply
      1. Tigger

        The F150 is Ford’s franchise. If buyers demand ICE 10, 15, 20 years- or more- out, that is what they are going to get.

        Reply
        1. TJ

          With current (since january 2021) govenment they dictate through regulations and several other means what will be and not us buyers. USA refining capacity has been reduced. In the blink of an eye (Really the hand and ink from a pen) the USA went from having sufficient crude to not have it. California and Mass already said no new ICE sold starting in 2035. I do not recall hearing these two states ask potential buyers (across the USA) if they that is fine with them.

          Reply
          1. Bruce

            The definition of fascism. Fascism is an economic policy. Government “lets you own a company” but controls production and profits. It is polar opposite of capitalism.

            Reply
            1. Bruce Williams

              Right-on! We have too much government in our lives!! Free markets are the best, by far! Free to choose, sums it up.

              Reply
    2. Adam Bauman

      I agree. There are a lot of people who are pumped about electric trucks without doing much reading about them. They dont have the range of gas or diesel and it takes a while to charge them compared to refueling. When you tow with them their range is extremely limited and if you plan on running them in a cold climate the range stinks because the batteries perform poorly in cold weather and power is needed to heat them.
      Like you said, pickups probably wont go completely electric in our lifetime.

      Reply
      1. Njia

        EVs don’t have the range of ICE — yet. I suspect that it will take another 5-ish years for solid state batteries to achieve 500+ miles of range and a charging rate of 25 miles per minute (they are already close on the charging rate). Once that happens, the advantages of diesel (and ICE generally) will be reduced to a few edge cases.

        Reply
        1. Earl Conley

          Biden’s executive orders caused the price of gas to go from $2 to $3.29 a gallon really put the hurt on lower income workers who have to commute to work. You should not have to decide to buy less groceries because of Biden’s actions. These people will not be buying a new electric car anytime soon.

          Reply
    3. William M Saulnier

      I have a 19 f150 w powerstroke, love it if ford drops the diesel ill be a chevy man simple as that

      Reply
  5. Gary bruce kempf

    I guess that depends on your age…

    Reply
  6. John Van

    When Ford goes to all electric vehicles I will no longer buy one. My King ranch is on the road to be delivered if it has to be it will be the last word I buy. I’m not driving 50 mi round trip to my cabin worrying about where I’m going to get power should it need it

    Reply
    1. Njia

      Does your cabin have electrical utilities? If it does, you’re covered.

      Reply
    2. Christina zumlinski

      I’m with you.bunch of crap!!! If for some reason that’s what they do,they better start putting in station’s. Not one within 100 miles +. Still won’t buy another. Fascist government!

      Reply
  7. David Baker

    Yes, I agree that it would be a bad idea to get rid it . Just need to offer it in all of the F-150s and just not the top end trucks. You could also offer it in the ranger. That’s my opinion as an ford owner.

    Reply
    1. Laytunes

      You can get it in any trim, it was only top trims in 2018. 2019 and up you can get it in an XL if you want.

      Reply
      1. jroosh

        You can’t get it in the Limited

        Reply
    2. David Pickford

      Not sure about the USA but certainly in the rest of the Ranger world this will be available. In Australia the Ranger/Everest will come with the 2 litre diesel (210hp/370ftpounds) as standard whilst this will be offered as an option except in the Raptor in which it will be standard. It’s not confirmed yet but it’s believed the 3litre from the Explorer etc will also be an option although many are hoping the Ftruck Raptors 3.5TT V6 will grace the Ranger Raptor.

      Reply
  8. Ryan

    I wouldn’t be very surprised if the 150s go all electric at the next redesign, for sure in 2 design cycles. The Super Duties though should retain a gas or diesel option for awhile

    Reply
  9. Roy Chile’s

    FORD F-150 never needed the Diesel 3.0 PowerStroke that’s what the Super Duty is reserve for. Plus it’s over shadow and out shine by a family of EcoBoost Engines

    Reply
    1. T

      And the Eco Diesel

      Reply
  10. Brad

    Europe is pushing to end all consumer diesel sales soon. Their power and torque used to far exceed gas engines, but with Ford’s new hybrid powertrain, the diesel advantages have been erased with the possible exception of longevity. Diesels are more expensive to maintain and to make clean. The Def system is expensive. Seems like a smart move in the F150. I think it’ll be a long, long time before this would happen in Super Duty trucks

    Reply
  11. JOHN HARTUP

    The small diesel in the light duty full size pickup was a bust. Obviously the sales/demand for that engine option was very low and never gained any traction. It’s a numbers game so Ford is deciding to invest the money into something more profitable , same with them killing their sedans.

    Reply
  12. Ted

    It’s a huge hit in the RAM with over 30MPG. And pulls like a frieght train . Big mistake by Ford.

    Reply
  13. Ford Owner

    No, it isn’t. You didn’t read the entire article. The F-150 Lightning prototype is the only truck that really pulled a freight train. Chevy and Ram will do the same by 2040 or earlier.

    Reply
  14. Jordan

    So pretty much the only reason we opted for the V8 over the diesel was the option for the 36 gallon tank. If the diesel had the extended range tank option it would have been a complete no-brainer.

    Reply
    1. Laytunes

      You can get a larger aftermarket tank if so desired. The range between the V8 and the diesel is actually pretty close, I’ve owned both. You burn far less fuel with the diesel, and thus don’t need as large of a tank. I get 1000km range out of my diesel, more than enough and I’ve never had a reason to want more. With diesel 20% cheaper than gas where I live, it’s a big win for me!

      Reply
  15. 3.0 Owner

    Well, it didn’t help that they NEVER advertised it. Unless you happen to be looking hard you will never notice it. I have one of these and love it!

    Reply
  16. Adam Bauman

    No wonder they are dropping this thing. The article states it gets 23 mpg. The super duty is a 7,000 lb truck with a 6.7 liter diesel that has 475 hp and 1050 ft lbs of torque and it gets 27 mpg hwy and 23 city for a 25 mpg average. This little 3 liter turd must not have been designed very well to be getting such poor fuel economy

    Reply
    1. Justin

      You’re lucky to get 16-18 hwy with an F250 diesel…not sure where you’re getting 27mpg…

      Reply
      1. Jon

        His 6.7 is probably 2wd with 3.31 gearing and the 10 speed trans. 🤣🤷‍♂️

        Reply
  17. Jon Novak

    Ford never advertised the power stoke in the F-150 like GM and Ram are doing. It’s almost like they were pressured into it. I’m not surprised by this move. Just like the Nissan Titan that had a cummins….. Don’t advertise, general public isn’t going to buy them. Simple logic.

    Reply
  18. Mark

    After owning a 2019 6.7 for 8 months and Ford dealer eventually buying it back, I can understand Ford’s move in pulling the 3.0. There are some things Ford should stay away from and diesel engines is one of them.

    Reply
  19. Ross

    I hope Ford isn’t giving up on this engine completely.
    It’s meant to be going into the Aus Ranger, it’ll be a massive hit but it needs an upgrade.
    Toyota will follow suit 18 months later with their new 3.3 and blow this thing out of the water
    I hope Ford don’t go in half-arsed

    Reply
  20. Keith Katz

    Funny thing about this which isn’t really discussed. In order to get close to the 440 lb-ft of torque the 3.0L diesel puts out at 1,750 RPM, both the smaller 2.7L 6 cyl (3,000 RPM), and the larger 5.0L 8cyl (4,250!!), must rev higher (much higher on the 8cyl). Higher RPM means not only more fuel consumption (2 more cylinders in the 5.0 as well), lower fuel economy, more noise, more friction & more heat production, but also more wear and tear, and shorter lifespan.

    My 2010 Ford F-150 Platinum 5.4L Ecoboost bit the dust (timing chain guide issues, sputtering, 250 RPM idling and stalling at red lights), at around 170K miles. Instead of spending $4,000 for a new motor, I traded the heap for a pristine 2012 F-350 King Ranch Tuxedo Black over Tan two-tone 6.7L with only 14K miles on it (what a find!) That engine should keep on trucking for 350K-500K or more, as long as I keep changing oil and filters frequently.

    Even the two 3.5L ‘Eco/PowerBoost’ engines can’t compete at those low RPM and must rev higher than the diesel, but do manage to exceed the torque (500/570 lb-ft), yet at still significantly higher RPM (3,100/3,000 RPM). Again, we’re talking about 1,000 to maybe 700 more RPM to get to 440lb-ft torque.

    I’ll keep running Diesel engines as long as I can get the fuel.

    Reply
  21. Stacy

    I have a f150 diesel I get 27 combined an 30 hwy this is a mistake no way the hybrid gets this tfl has proven it doesn’t get mpg it says with the ram beating the hybrid on the Ike gauntlet

    Reply
  22. Jeff

    I’m a tech at a Ford dealer and the fact that Ford had a diesel option in the transit’s and the f150’s is often easily forgotten. We’ve had several customers inquire about them, but none were willing to pay up for the option. I’ve yet to see the diesel version of either roll across our lot. I doubt it will be a missed option.

    Reply
  23. Don

    The way ford offer diesel motor in cost and other options made it under desirable

    Reply
  24. Larry B

    After diving the 3.5 Ecoboost, I’ll keep my 3.0 diesel, thank you very much. I love it!

    Reply
  25. Daniel Isabelle

    Bad idea. There are people who love diesel engines and for some who want one but would like to have one in an f150 i think is a perfect fit. The ford powerstroke diesel engine has in some ways been very good. There has been some not so good but all in all deleting the diesel f150 is a mistake

    Reply
  26. Love my powerstroke

    My PowerStroke gets 28-32 mpg at 75mph on highway trips depending upon terrain. Got 14 mpg towing a 5000 lb camper through the mountains and back (900 miles). No other F150 offers that capability. At every dealership I had to specifically seek out the diesel and the salesmen knew nothing about it. None of them had ever even ridden in one. Completely unaware of it’s performance and merits. The most efficient gasoline engines are pushing 35% efficient, the most efficient diesels are a touch over 40%.

    Reply
  27. John

    I have the 3.5 eco boost and I looked at the diesel in Ford Chevy and Dodge

    The diesel platforms all are at uninspiring
    None will tow what I needed and the price tag was higher

    I would love to have the 3.5 hybrid with the 7K generator

    Unles there is a major breakthrough in battery technology battery powered vehicles will not be doing away with gasoline vehicles and the big winter storm in Texas brought it home how not to depend to heavily on the electrical grid

    Reply
  28. Mark Mundwiller

    If they expect the general public to buy an electric truck they are going to have to bring the prices down. Right now the proposed ranges of these vehicles are limited to city people. Those of us that commute 100 miles plus a day are not in the market for it. If you are hauling anything you are limited and pulling even a small trailer is out of the question.

    Reply
  29. Mike Maise

    Sorry to hear this. I love mine and will be hanging on to it. I don’t know where they get 23 mpg, I’ve gotten 35 mpg running at normal speed over a long distance. Heck, avg 25-27 mpg running 85 mph for hours on the interstate giving it great range–can’t imagine a 34 gallon tank it would be sick.

    Look forward to reviewing this thread again in 10 years when this diesel is just getting broke in and all the haters on here are on their 3rd or 4th truck.

    Reply
  30. Tommy D

    I see a bunch of comment from people who don’t own one. I have three F-150s , a 5.0, a 2.7 ecoboost, and the 3.0 power stroke. All three trucks are 2018 and 4×4, the power stroke averages about 27, the ecoboost bounces between 20.7 and 20.3, the 5.0 averages about 16. I would buy that 3.0 power stroke in every f150 from here on out if they kept it available. I always see the HP figures referenced but nobody is buying a truck to race. Diesel engines typically have less HP and more torque than a gas engine, that’s just the way it is. I was genuinely interested in the lightning but with a range of 300 miles I’ll be waiting on electric. I pull a boat from south florida to Georgia quite often and with the reduced range for towing with electric, I’m not stopping to charge my truck 6 to 7 times to go one state up. Improve the electric range and I’m in

    Reply
  31. Martin Scott

    Hmmm, I’m sure in the real world the diesel out performs the the ecoboast in terms of economy and as long as you’re not racing other vehicles, take off speed is adequate.
    If you are fir whatever reason fixated with racing, buy a sports car.

    Reply
  32. Scott Brown

    The government regulators are absolutely against consumer market diesel vehicles.
    The emissions technology was greatly improved. So, the regulations were tightened up even more. It has almost ruined companies like Jaguar Land Rover who invested heavily in clean diesel technology, only to have the rug pulled out from under them in terms of being able to produce the vehicles and amortize the cost out over five to seven years. It shows the capricious attitude of government in regards to understanding the immense cost of these technologies.

    Reply
  33. Jason

    Its was there for the fuel economy “cafe standards” (fuel economy) the gov. has set that US vehicles must average by certain yrs.
    With the new Powerboost and soon to be released Lightning, its no longer needed for its fuel econ rating to help Ford achieve the standards.
    The emissions rating required by diesel engines in the US is the largest hamper to reliable diesel performance by US vehicles.
    The cost to producer and end user no longer makes sense to drive a diesel unless your doing 35k miles / yr or more or towing significant amounts of weight weekly.. 15k ++

    Reply
  34. Al

    Ever have toys during Christmas in the late 60’s early 70’s that required batteries? Expensive and very short play time! That is exactly where we are at now with battery operated vehicles. No thank you. In 30-40 years it may be the standard but I’m not donating towards it today. Naturally aspirated, pushrod is my go-2. GO GO Godzilla!!

    Reply
  35. David K. Harrison

    I’m a Ford only guy when it comes to trucks. I’m on my 5th SD 250, and own 3 F150s (daughter’s). Even with tech advancements 10+ years from now I can’t see all-electric justifying owning a truck. There’s no way it could perform optimally when used for its purpose. It may suffice for those driving truck for show. I’m even weary those packed full of turbos, and hybrids. This crap is getting out of hand…

    Reply
  36. Mobofx

    Ford went too small with their diesel, should have went V-8, at least 5 liter. Diesel economy is nice but the priority is power. Power sells, economy is a positive secondary.

    Reply
  37. Mark Wrobel

    I had a ‘13 F150 4×4 Lariat crew 3.5 ecoboost that was awesome. I sold it to my son and the top half blew just after the warranty expired on time at 119k. I was waiting to order a ‘21 when 18 months ago I found a ‘18 F150 Platinum crew 6.5 diesel 4×4 with every option. It had 24k miles and I saved $30k off the $72k sticker as it was a factory buy back. This is my first diesel and is absolutely awesome. It’s quiet, quick, and extremely dependable. I just turned 40k miles and average 26 mpg. On the highway under 70 I routinely get 28-31 mpg! I think this engine is an extremely viable solution for a lot of truck owners. I think it’s the most versatile. I live in the Chicago suburbs but am moving to the desert SW. I understand that there are some extreme needs of speed and towing. My my truck is my personal Swiss Army knife that can literally do anything well!

    Reply
  38. John

    Going all electric on the F150 would kill their sells numbers. Electric vehicles appeal more to the people who own trucks but never work their truck. Sure there are charging stations in larger cities but if you live in a rural area try finding somewhere to plug it in, try asking someone if there is a place to charge your electric truck in a rural area and watch how hard they laugh. I pull a trailer loaded with anything from another project car to a tractor to mow the pasture and I don’t care to worry if I am going to run out of power in the middle of nowhere with no way to charge it. Also how are you going to charge all these electric vehicles when the electric grid in the US is already overloaded, look at Dallas last February, they won’t charge to well when there’s no power available. I’m a 60’s child and even though I find electric cars a cool thing to play around with, especially in my RC cars I don’t want one in my everyday driver/ work truck. Luckily I have a strong mechanical background and can keep my gas burner alive as long as I want. So far my 2010 F150 has 265,740 miles and is still running strong, I wonder if those batteries will hold up that long in the Texas heat and winters while being worked hard towing a loaded trailer? I day give the people the option. If they want electric offer it but also offer the gas option for the ones who don’t want electric. As for the small V6 diesel? Not a fan. I can drop a Early gen Cummins in my F150 and have more power and torque than the little V6, and with my generation more power is what it’s all about lol

    Reply
  39. Dain Dempsey

    Uhmmmm yeah we live in AMERICA, born and raised FORD (thanks dad)! V8 all the way both gas and diesel. I and more then half of us have to take proper action to secure our PLANET from going belly up due to global warming and burning fossil fuels. Everybody knows though that if you want to sell alot of anything no matter what it really is you have to have many options now a days to try and please everyone. Having too many options though can put you in the hole just because you are trying to seriously please everyone with different engine/drivetrain options. I know what works, have been around a bit. My f 150 is my cruising truck, but if and or when I need to rip a 60 ft. tree out the ground or drag a house off it’s foundation I have my beast mode 7.3 work horse!!! Love my DIESEL baby, YEAH!!!

    Reply
  40. BJ

    You have never lied!! I traded my F150 Platinum 3.0 in for the new Genesis GV80. I normal drove 600-625 mile a tank, towed over 15k(not safe) 400 miles on a tank military retirement trip. I plan to get the 2022 but it doesn’t come in the Limited package, if you have never drove this truck you have no idea about this truck. I’ve had dealership owner stop me and question me about the truck Ford didn’t market the truck right.

    Reply
    1. Charity N.

      If you guy’s brought back the 7.3L powerstroke I know lots of people wanting to buy them and keep them because they are the best darn diesel engine. We have been buying them for years and love everyone that we have owned. I own a 2002 F-150 and it has been pretty darn good. We do alot of towing and carrying heavy loads. Would love to have a f-150 with a diesel engine in it.

      Reply
  41. Kenneth Campbell

    Ford really needs to invest more in diesel technology. They should have built a nice stout 4.0 liter diesel for the F-150 and the Transit van. They could have paid for it by scraping their absolutely ridiculous remake of the Bronco!! It’s nothing more then soccer mom grocery-getter with a mountain and a pine tree emblem on the side. It’s as bad of an idea as the Pinto and the Mustang II we’re back in the day.

    Reply
    1. j

      I think you’re talking about the Bronco Sport. You probably haven’t seen the new Bronco on the road yet…

      Reply
  42. Josh

    Nobody wanted a diesel with a timing BELT. Ford just slapped a cheap Land Rover diesel in the F-150 as a me-too type thing because of Ram. Everyone knew this wasn’t going to last because if Ford really cared they would have built it in house like the Scorpion.

    Reply
  43. Jerry W Strickland

    Diesels in heavy duty makes economic sense. In light duty not so much. Owners are not as likely to pay a premium of diesel engine cost when they don’t need the torque.

    Reply
  44. Pat

    IMHO, Ford dropped the diesel v6 due to it being junk, just like dodge’s diesel v6. The EV’s won’t take over due to the lack of towing distance. 5 or even 10 years will not help with better batteries. The states that are banning non EVs, will only have city dwellers living there by that time.

    Reply
  45. Charity Nitzel

    If you guy’s brought back the 7.3L powerstroke I know lots of people wanting to buy them and keep them because they are the best darn diesel engine. We have been buying them for years and love everyone that we have owned.

    Reply
  46. Earl Conley

    Biden’s executive orders caused the price of gas to go from $2 to $3.29 a gallon really put the hurt on lower income workers who have to commute to work. You should not have to decide to buy less groceries because of Biden’s actions. These people will not be buying a new electric car anytime soon.

    Reply
  47. Shawn Thatcher

    Says the Trumptard

    Reply
  48. Mike Hunt

    So you recharge an electric truck with electricity generated from a fossil fuel power plant. Such efficiency. Damn Idiots !!!!

    Reply
  49. DAVID T BLANKENSHIP

    Ford you guys really need to pair back up with International and come back out with the 7.3 Liter Powerstroke Diesel again but modernized it to where it gets better fuel economy but just as much power as the old one’s used to get if not more and make it to where you don’t have to drop $10,000 dollars into bulletproofing the motor right off the bat like you did with the 6.0 Liters and 6.4 Liters brand new off the lot. Make it like the 6.7 Liters but even better and with even better power and fuel economy. And I think you guys would see a big sky rocket in sales. Cause there is a lot a diesel freaks out there like me that want the 7.3 Liter Powerstroke Diesels back and better then ever and would buy them with no hesitation.

    Reply
  50. L. ANDERSON

    Electric vehicles might have some utility for rich eastern city commuters provided they can charge them overnight. In the west, the distances driven and lack of charging infrastructure will require 600 plus range miles to be considered competitively by the average consumer. Who the heck wants to wait/charge for an hour every time you go on a long trip, if you can find a charging spot. Also, go compare the cost of charging your EV to ICE gasoline costs. EVs are not that much cheaper than gas.
    Also, when you add in the high upfront purchase cost vs ICE models, it doesn’t make sense economically. EV’s are toys for rich folks.

    The F150 Hybrid is a great truck with power, horsepower and game changing features. Probably Fords best truck ever.

    The Lightning is great if you don’t mind only going a few hundred miles (without a load), we call those trucks Mall Crawlers. Have you seen the charge times for that massive battery? Another toy.

    Reply
  51. Glenn Redwine

    I am not ready to go all electric yet. I want an NG/ propane hybrid.

    Reply
  52. Douglas

    I have been a faithful Ford man all my life but it is costing my thousands of extra dollars a year to do so. Ford has lost my respect for that reason. They need to build something reliable. If they want to stay on top. I refuse to go down that road again

    Reply
  53. Joseph Augustine

    I think they might keep diesels in the Ford Superduty line. As far as an All electric F-150 Pick up I doubt it; The towing capacity would suck not just the lack of range doing it. So Just like the lack of new oil refineries they don’t seem to be building any new electric power plants either. Can’t have Nuke power I guess we will have ro wait for the sun to come up or the wind to blow.

    Reply
  54. Lost soul.

    Well first issue is you HAVE to buy the high end to get the diesel. Anyone like me that wants an XLT can’t get that engine. (First mistake). Going by sales of a world shut down with no one driving (mistake two).
    EV’s where I live won’t work. The power grid is crap. Cuts out all the time. All the extra cars will crash it and no one will get power. Plus I’ll be almost max range every day going to and from work. Hope I don’t need to stop for something. Going off a diesel generator you only getting 5mpg, so gas/diesel is better for the environment.
    I’ll love a diesel f150, but I can’t buy till ford gives an affordable option, like the XL, XLT.

    Reply
  55. jroosh

    I have an ’18 Lariat PowerStroke and love the torque and the efficiency of this engine. Also, Ford covers the engine to 100,000 miles.

    The Diesel really only makes sense if you put a ton of highway miles on, and I do. If not, the PowerBoost gets better overall MPG and is probably a better option.

    I might trade up to a new PowerStroke Platinum before they stop offering it.

    Reply
  56. jroosh

    I have an ’18 Lariat PowerStroke and love the torque and the efficiency of this engine. Also, Ford covers the engine to 100,000 miles.

    The Diesel really makes financial sense if you put a ton of highway miles on, and I do. If not, the PowerBoost gets better overall MPG and is probably a better option.

    I might trade up to a new PowerStroke Platinum before they stop offering it.

    Reply
  57. Jason

    Chevrolet Eco diesel is having major issues blowing rods out of the block at 50 miles use.

    I’ve not heard any issues on Ford power stroke. But with all the other options and better towing capabilities in gas I can see why the drop.

    Reply
  58. Mike

    They don’t sell, it’s a dumb idea to keep making an engine that no one buys. It’s like the station wagons or shooting brakes. Everyone writes how stupid these companies are to stop selling their station wagons here, but they don’t buy them, nor does anyone else. But they keep writing the same stuff every time another company stops. The idea that all models will be electric anytime soon, is laughable.

    Reply

Leave a comment

Cancel
Sponsored