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2022 Ford Maverick Reservations Largely Coming From California

The 2022 Ford Maverick is the first-ever compact pickup with a standard hybrid powertrain, and as Ford Authority was the first to report, it carries a starting MSRP of just under $20,000. Given its fuel efficient powertrain and attractive pricing, it’s no wonder that a lot of Ford passenger car owners are thinking about moving into the pickup. Additionally, over 80,000 people have reserved a Maverick, and according to Ford, a majority of them reside in California.

2022 Ford Maverick

The update about where the largest group of 2022 Ford Maverick reservation holders reside was disclosed as part of The Blue Oval’s July 2021 U.S. sales report, where the company also stated that it is expanding its electrified vehicle presence in the Golden State. Next year, the automaker is set to make further inroads in the state, as the majority of 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning reservations are also coming from California. It is also possible that some fleet customers in the state have decided that the Maverick will work for them. As Ford Authority recently detailed, the company expects the unibody pickup to resonate with certain businesses and has heard that they are interested in it.

2022 Ford Maverick

Aside from not being based on a traditional body-on-frame platform, there are a lot of details about the 2022 Ford Maverick that make it unique. For starters, Ford cut off a huge amount of time developing it, and created the FITS 3D printing-friendly interior slots as part of that expedited process. The optional B&O sound system utilizes a rear speaker that sits behind the second row seat, practically residing underneath it too, and Ford Authority was the first to report that the base audio setup even have its own name: the Connected Touch Radio. While it is unclear if these specific things resonated with reservation holders from California, what’s clear is that the Maverick is clearly resonating with potential buyers.

We’ll have more on the Ford Maverick soon, so subscribe to Ford Authority for more Ford Maverick news and continuous Ford news coverage.

Ed owns a 1986 Ford Taurus LX, and he routinely daydreams about buying another one, a fantasy that may someday become a reality.

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Comments

  1. Edward H de Jong

    At almost $5 for a gallon of gas, Californians are desperate for a high mileage truck. the savings in operating cost over the lifespan of the vehicle (10 years) will more than pay for half the truck cost.

    Reply
    1. NCEcoBoost

      Yes, but it’s also the “trendy/greenie” state. So glad I don’t live there and if I did, I’d be moving. Ugh.

      Reply
      1. Bob Mourino

        Green is good, green is the future.

        Reply
      2. Rational

        California has some stupid policies for sure, but it’s still a better state to live in than yours for a variety of reasons.

        Reply
        1. Red

          I highly doubt that.

          Reply
  2. Rational

    It’s appealing to me. It’s a do it all truck for everything I would do and it’s actually affordable. Since I’m anonymous here, I’ll put out, I make about $175k and I wouldn’t want to spend more than $30k on a vehicle, yet I see people making like $75k driving $50k trucks/cars. That’s insanity. If you’re doing heavy towing/off-roading/hauling, it’s not the right truck…..but for the other 95% of people (including the 50% lying to themselves about what they’ll actually do with their truck) this looks like a great option. Now we’ll just have to see how reliable it turns out to be.

    Reply
  3. Richard

    Customers are clamoring for affordable vehicles. This one fits the bill. I am certainly not interested in the monster size trucks and SUV’s.

    Reply
  4. Striker_5

    California has the largest order % because they’re the biggest population state. 10,000,000 more than the next biggest state, not that hard to comprehend

    Reply

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