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2022 Ford Mustang GT, Mach 1 Output To Drop By 10 Horses: Exclusive

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The 2022 Ford Mustang GT and Mach 1 will take a 10 horsepower and 10 pound-feet of torque hit to their respective outputs when they debut early next year, sources familiar with the muscle car’s launch have confirmed to Ford Authority. An exact reason was not given, but the slight alterations to the Ford 5.0L Coyote V8 output are being blamed on emissions requirements. The reduced output is part of several unannounced changes coming to the lineup, in addition to changes that The Blue Oval already announced.

2022 Mustang GT 2021 Mustang GT + / – 2022 Mustang GT
Horsepower 450 460 -10
Torque 410 420 -10

Output for the 2022 Ford Mustang GT will drop by 10 for horsepower and torque, regardless of transmission. For the upcoming model year changeover, GT Premium coupe and convertible are available with the updated California Special Appearance Package, which boasts revised cosmetic elements and the ability to be paired with the GT Performance Package.

2022 Mustang Mach 1 2021 Mustang Mach 1 + / – 2022 Mustang Mach 1
Horsepower 470 480 -10
Torque 410 420 -10

The 2022 Ford Mustang Mach 1 lineup will similarly feature ten less horsepower and torque across the board. By contrast, the 2022 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 will continue to solider on with the same power figures from 2021, as that specialty model features the supercharged Ford 5.2L Predator V8, not the Coyote.

2022 Ford Mustang

Additionally, the 2022 Mustang lineup is receiving changes that have yet to be announced. For starters, seven new paint options will be available, although it’s likely they’re replacing some of the options currently available on the 2021 model. There will also be another all-new appearance package joining the family, which brings the amount of new appearance packages to three, in addition to the updated California Special package.

2022 Ford Mustang

The Blue Oval previously announced the Ice White Edition Appearance Package, and the Stealth Edition Appearance Package, on two separate occasions. In addition to the news about the slight power reduction, Ford Authority can also report that 2022 Mustang order banks have opened. Deliveries of the updated Mustang are slated for Q1 2022. These substantial changes arrive at an interesting time, as the 2023 Ford Mustang is expected to be an all-new model.

We’ll have more on the 2022 Ford Mustang soon, so subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford Mustang news, and continuous Ford news coverage.

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Ed owns a 1986 Ford Taurus LX, and he routinely daydreams about buying another one, a fantasy that may someday become a reality.

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Comments

  1. JimL

    Hopefully this will add to the value of my 480-hp 2019 Bullitt.

    Reply
  2. Samurai

    Ok but why? I know for emissions but damn.

    Reply
  3. wayne guess

    how about just adding to a nice round number like 510 horse and then deduct the 10 to a 500 horse , will the price decrease also??

    Reply
  4. Hector

    Order banks open? I don’t see it on Ford’s website.

    Reply
  5. frank

    surprised you havent crashed your mustang yet

    Reply
  6. Keith Johnson

    the Golden Age of High Performance is coming to an end

    Reply
  7. Charles hart

    Not sure I believe this but Ford screwed up again if true!

    Reply
    1. Drew

      So, exactly what is the screw up? Have you seen the torque curve? If they traded a peak torque rating for a broader high torque curve (i.e., providing more torque at a more often used RPM), then the result can be great. If… But we won’t know until we see the torque curves.

      Reply
  8. commbubba19

    “2022 Ford Mustang Mach 1 lineup will similarly feature a 10 percent output reduction across”

    math is hard…..

    Reply
  9. R. Walker

    Sounds like the early 1970s all over again. Those were the early days of the emissions program. The horsepower dropped from upwards of 450-470 down to the 270 range.
    The fun ended and you couldn’t buy a fun car until the early to mid 80s when Ford dropped the 5.0 into the Mustang GT. I think there were some years in there where the Corvette was rated at 210 or so. Sad times are coming again. The sad thing is the government is currently going into speed shops and garages and closing them down and/or hitting them with stiff fines for making modifications.

    Reply
    1. zshazz

      Eh, one quick goose of an EV will correct that perspective for you really fast. I have a Tesla Model 3 Performance, and driving an ICE (even a performance car) feels like you’re driving an economy car. Once all of the manufacturers start building EVs and once battery technology gets better (e.g. lighter), you’ll look back at these days as fondly as the 80s. You’ll be driving cars that zip around with instantaneous mountains of torque that make the GT500 feel like a Honda Civic, sipping energy cheaper than driving a Prius now.

      Reply
      1. jaguar

        So yeah, everyone doesn’t have the same perspective as you. I.e manually handling a car, listening to the organic sound of an internal combustion engine, etc. there are automotive purists and there is you and yours. There are people who prefer to listen to lo fidelity mix arrangements versus hifi.

        Reply
        1. zshazz

          Sure, but this conversation is about power/performance. If you don’t care about power/performance and only want those things you mentioned, then you shouldn’t be getting so worked up about a loss of horsepower to make some efficiency gains because, like you mentioned, “manually handling a car” and “having an organic sound” is what is important to you.

          If you’re worried about power, EVs are so far beyond an ICE in terms of performance it’s, like I said, like comparing a current ICE performance car to a current ICE economy car.

          Reply
  10. Curtis Boydstun

    I’m glad I have my gen 3 5.0 2019!!! I remember that 70’s emissions era

    Reply
  11. O Hanson

    So happy I have my FJG ‘21 Mach 1 safely in my garage. They told me it would be the greatest 5.0 there ever will be due to expected cuts in power and they didn’t lie. Guess the value of ‘21 should only rise from here. Also with the Tremec 6 speed manual- just tried to get in before they make everything automatic as well.

    Reply
  12. JohnIL

    EPA has free rein these days, bet we see more of this as the bar get’s raised again to lower emissions. Wonder how many GT owners use 87 octane anyway which drops performance numbers? Saw a GT at the pump the other day, guy was pumping in 87 cheap off brand gas into it. Few more years Ford will be all EV anyway caving to government pressure to switch.
    Either that, or the EPA raises the bar on emissions so high we are running 3 cylinder turbo’s with everything.

    Reply
  13. AFM

    Having ridden in a few basic EVs, experiencing their near-silent, but enormous shove, I am convinced young folks will look upon the muscle cars, new and old, with utter disdain within a few short years.
    My FJG/Tremec ’21 and the current GT500 are likely to go down in history as the last ICE blast from a factory (excluding the exotica). I suspect it won’t be long before the modern hotroddders are swapping out armatures, swapping in multi-ratio transmissions, and scouring the internet for high output batteries.

    Reply

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