mobile-menu-icon
Ford Authority
Sponsored

Rare 1941 Lincoln Zephyr Headed To Florida Auction Block

Sponsored

The Lincoln-Zephyr debuted November 2nd, 1935 for the 1936 model year, taking its name from the Greek Zephyros, god of the west wind. It was a separate marque sold at Lincoln dealers, sandwiched between the Ford Model V8 Deluxe and Lincoln Model K. Available as either a two-door coupe or four-door sedan, the Lincoln-Zephyr was powered by a 267 cubic-inch flathead V12 producing 110 horsepower mated to a three-speed manual transmission.

The Lincoln-Zephyr became a competitor to GM’s LaSalle, the Packard One-Twenty, and Chrysler’s Airflow. The design of the FoMoCo offering was sleek and streamlined, with fenders that blended into the body and a raked windshield. More slippery than the Chrysler Airflow, the Lincoln-Zephyr’s popularity helped Lincoln recapture market share in the late 1930s.

In 1940, Lincoln became a division unto itself, and the Lincoln-Zephyr dropped the hyphen and became a Lincoln model, as the Lincoln Model K was replaced by the Zephyr-based Lincoln Custom. Available as a Sedan, Coupe, Club Coupe and Convertible Coupe, the 1941 Lincoln Zephyr saw an increase in displacement for the V12, growing to 292 cubic-inches and producing 130 horsepower. All American car production came to a halt in 1942, as manufacturers shifted their focus to the United States’ World War II efforts.

Our feature Lincoln Zephyr is one of 1,150 Zephyr three-window coupes produced for the 1941 model year. It was the subject of a body-off restoration in 2003. Resplendent in Darian Blue metallic, the respray appears to be of exceptional quality. Chrome bumpers and trim look to have been either re-plated or replaced. Stainless trim is in similar nick, with no flaws noted and polished to a mirror shine. Painted steel wheels are shod in wide whitewall bias ply tires, and topped with Lincoln-branded hubcaps and polished beauty rings. The rear wheel wells sport fender skirts.

Inside the Lincoln Zephyr is upholstered in blue cloth. The dash is adorned with woodgrain and gold trim. The woodgrain continues on the interior windshield frame and door panels. The blue cloth upholstery and Wilton wool carpet show scarce signs of use. A multi-function gauge is located just above the steering column, directly in front of the driver.

The Lincoln Zephyr is powered by the aforementioned 130 horsepower, 292 cubic-inch 60 degree flathead V12. The engine compartment is quite well detailed, with glossy Darian Blue paint covering the inner fenders and firewall. The flathead valve covers are impressive, with uniformly routed spark plug wires feeding a half dozen plugs per side.

Included in the sale of this Lincoln Zephyr will be restoration photos, receipts, Zephyr dealership brochures and V-12 engine manual.

This rare Lincoln Zephyr Coupe will be crossing the auction block at the Mecum Auctions Kissimmee, Florida sale happening January 6th-16th.

Be sure to subscribe to Ford Authority for more Lincoln news and continuous Ford news coverage.

Sponsored

Subscribe to Ford Authority

For around-the-clock Ford news coverage

We'll send you one email per day with the latest Ford updates. It's totally free.

Sponsored

Comments

  1. Roy Chile’s

    Simply Beautiful from the 40’s to 98 are the cars that will really define LINCOLN

    Reply
  2. Montana Man

    Am I missing it, or is there no radio in that Zephyr?

    Reply
    1. Ford500guy

      Their is a radio, you just have to look closer.. The control knob is just right of the speaker grill..

      Reply
      1. TheRetiredViking

        See the rectangular plate above the speaker grille; the one that says Lincoln? That is where the radio goes. This car was built without one. Even luxury cars of the era did not have a radio as standard.

        I have no idea what the round thing to the right of the grille was for

        Reply
  3. Stephen Ketterer

    A work of art on wheels!

    Reply
    1. TheRetiredViking

      My late uncle had several of them in various states of disrepair; his intent was to restore them. He passed away young so that didn’t happen.

      Reply

Leave a comment

Cancel
Sponsored