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Ultra-Clean 1963 Ford F-100 Pickup Headed To Barrett-Jackson

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The Ford F-100 debuted for the 1953 model year, replacing the F-1 as the entry level Ford pickup. Ford’s then-new half-ton featured larger dimensions, upgraded engines, and an improved chassis. The windshield now featured a wraparound design, the cab received redesigned doors, the dashboard was new, and an optional panoramic read window could be had.

For the 1961 model year, the F-100 received a complete restyling. The fourth generation F-Series became lower, longer, and larger than previous iterations, with a unibody design and integrated cab and bed. New engine and transmission choices were available. This generation, however, would only last through the 1963 model year.

Our feature 1963 F-100 is a staggering custom, nicknamed “Uno”, that took numerous well-known shops and builders five years to build. The body was stripped to bare metal and smoothed before being sprayed in a glossy stark white hue. The bed is made of airbrushed aluminum that looks like wood, but is lighter and more robust. Bumpers are coated in satin black. The F-100 rolls on gloss black wheels from Billet Specialties measuring 20 inches in front and 22-two inches in back. Stopping duties are handled by Wilwood disc brakes.

Inside the F-100 has a black leather bench seat with Alcantara inserts accented with red diamond-pattern stitching. The dash has been finished in black satin, and is home to Restomod Air climate control with custom vents, Dakota Digital gauges, and a start button rather than a key. A Billet Specialties steering wheel is mounted to the Ididit tilt steering column. The F-100 has also been fitted with a Morel sound system, speakers, sub, and amp.

Powering the Ford F-100 is a 515 horsepower, 547 cubic-inch Roush Yates V8 featuring a Billet Specialties Tru-Trac serpentine drive belt system. Moving that power to the rear wheels is a TCI six-speed automatic transmission, a custom carbon-fiber drive shaft, and a Strange rear diff with 3.89 gears. Spent gases are exhaled through a Cerakoted three-inch exhaust with MagnaFlow mufflers. The inner fenders and firewall are finished in a satin black, the 547 cube Roush Yates mill is adorned with gloss black valve covers, a polished billet intake, and the engine bay is highly detailed.

This impressive Ford F-100 will be crossing the auction block at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale sale taking place January 22nd through the 30th.

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Comments

  1. F-150.Prius

    The retromod stuff is neither here nor there, but this is a stout example of why the F-100 is so impressive. I think if someone built this as an electric vehicle, it would sell as many as they could build.

    Reply
    1. Steve

      Oh dear God, are you serious right now, turn this beauty into an EV. Blasphemy, I tell you Blasphemy.

      Reply
    2. Dee Hart

      you did not just say that?! Truck purists will be headhunting you for that remark! I will admit that in the racing world, E.V. is making itself heard. Just not in a personal ride IMHO

      Reply
  2. Brad Barefoot

    The modifications are cute, but sorry no cigar. First an foremost, it one wants top dollar for a vehicle, have it as close to factory specs as possible. I don’t know the market buyers for the truck as presented, but I do for a factory spec restoration … I believe there’s more buyers there guys.

    Reply
    1. Dee Hart

      beauty is in the eye of the beholder. nice resto-mod BUT I have to agree with you.

      Reply
  3. Steve

    Okay, well some guy took a perfectly awesome truck and turned it into a car. Why??? It’s a truck. It’s made to be a truck. For the love of God and country, please stop with this nonsense of turning a truck into a car. You buy trucks because they are trucks. This poor old truck. So sad to see this. Just imagine how cool this truck would look restored to it’s original look.

    Reply

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