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Ford Dealers Rank Below Average In 2022 Customer Service Index Study

Ford dealers are facing tremendous change in the coming months as FoMoCo recently revealed that it will ask each to specialize in either ICE-powered vehicles, EVs, or Ford Pro, the automaker’s dedicated commercial business. This comes as supply chain issues and the pandemic have led to empty lots and an increase in mobile services and tools such as vehicle pick up and delivery and headset diagnostic tools, while the FordPass app has at least helped dealers bring in more service customers. Regardless, Ford dealers ranked below average on J.D. Power’s newly released 2022 U.S. Customer Service Index (CSI) Study, though there is a bit of improvement to note over last year’s ranking.

Last year, Ford dealers ranked 14th among mass-market brands with a score of 833 out of 1,000 on the same study, but this year saw an improvement to 12th place with a score of 838, though The Blue Oval still ranks slightly below the industry average of 844. That score also places FoMoCo behind Mini (873), Buick (872), Mazda (856), Mitsubishi (854), GMC (853), Chevrolet (852), Subaru (852), Nissan (849), Toyota (848), and Dodge (840), but ahead of Ram (836), Honda (835), Jeep (834), Kia (834), Volkswagen (833), Hyundai (831), and Chrysler (808).

J.D. Power’s U.S. Customer Service Index Study measures satisfaction with service at franchised dealers or aftermarket service facilities for maintenance or repair work among owners and lessees of one- to three-year-old vehicles. It also provides a numerical index ranking of the highest-performing automotive brands sold in the United States, which is based on the combined scores of five measures that comprise the vehicle owner service experience – service quality, service advisor, vehicle pick-up, service facility, and service initiation. This year’s study includes the impacts of a few new features on the dealer experience such as valet service, remote vehicle servicing, and online/smartphone app payment options.

“Dealer service departments are in a pivotal position to improve customer satisfaction and provide greater customer convenience, even though many challenges – including the parts supply chain disruption and the availability of new-vehicle loaners­ – are out of their control,” said Chris Sutton, vice president of automotive retail at J.D. Power. “Proactive communication with customers is one solution for dealerships to mitigate a disruptively tough situation. Simply implementing text or email alerts can greatly improve customer satisfaction. Additionally, letting customers know what is happening at each step along the way, including why it is taking longer to book an appointment or providing any updates in parts delays, can help improve satisfaction.”

We’ll have more insights like this to share soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for 24/7 Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. crabbymilton

    The FORD dealer that I took my old GRAND MARQUIS for service was generally fine with people that I got to know and they always did a good job with repairs and never steered me wrong. One problem that I brought up a few times and it always seemed to come back again. When they get finished, they bring the car around and give the keys to the cashier. Yet for some reason it can take over 10 minutes before I can actually be given my car back. Then the cashier was often talking and giggling with her coworkers who were also on the dingbat side. So was their a hot Cribbage game going on back there hence the time that it takes to get that paper work ready?

    Reply
    1. Jeffrey D. Sproul

      I had a family owned Ford dealership that has been owned by the same family for over 60 years that I would go to that had outstanding but now the whole service department has turned over and the service is bad. The dealership is currently for sale. I had a similar experience with a Buick GMC dealership and the same thing happened to me I had to go around the lot to search for my car while the cashier and service people were shooting the breeze. This has happened to be at a Chevy dealership as well. Service has taking a nose dive at most places maybe some of it has to do with the labor shortage but it is a real turn off. If anything service is more important during these times when there are few vehicles to sell and the dealers need the revenue from service even more.

      Reply
  2. The Gentle Grizzly

    I can’t make a judgment about my local dealers, because none wanted to talk to me, much less try to sell me a vehicle. The only one that did closed the doors over a year ago.

    Reply
  3. NCEcoBoost

    Interesting that brands with the most recalls fared the worst in this study. I’ve experienced far worse service with Ford than I ever did with Chevy. How on earth can it take 2 1/2 hours for a simple oil/filter change? Happens all the time. And that’s IF they don’t lose the vehicle.

    Reply
    1. The Gentle Grizzly

      Do they “lose” the vehicle while pushing you toward the showroom? As for 2 1/2 hours for an oil change, a lot of dealers are doing that nonsense now. I think it is to get the customer to browse around among the new vehicles when there are any in stock.

      I always get my oil changes at the dealer so there is never a quibble about the right oil or filter should a warranty issue arise. There are always coupons on line to keep the price reasonable.

      I also go to dealers with “speed lines” when possible. That is where they have a dedicated service crew for just oil changes and inspections.

      Reply
  4. crabbymilton

    I love it when you make an appointment either online or over the phone then when you get there, they ask what the problem is and then explain every little thing again. This is the dealer I use for my TRANSIT CONNECT work van. I mean don’t they write things down and/or communicate by entering this into their system. Then I get there first thing in the morning as scheduled and they poddle around and take over 2 hours for a simple oil change and tire rotation. But I can straggle around the showroom and look at the new FORD sedans that….Oh that’s right they don'[t build those for America anymore.

    Reply
  5. F-150.Prius

    From what I’ve read, Jim Farley is aware of these dealer franchise problems – separating out the electric vehicles to a new business, preventing gouging and emphasizing service are the things that will save Ford from extinction as the US domestic auto market undergoes another “Toyota” shift. Consumers are going to buy the EV they want and they’re going to remember the last 20 years of declining “ownership experience” with Ford and GM.
    Good that Ford corporate is compelled to listen to JD Power because the dealers are not listening to customers – Ford dealers have gone from bad to worse and the goods ones are conspicuous because of all the bad dealers. My favorite dealer (since 2005) cut staff and the current management couldn’t organize their way out of a wet paper bag. Due to their incompetence, I switched to a new dealer because (a) gouging and (b) crap service, and bought a new F-150 Hybrid (a great truck.) Ford still gets the revenue this time, but it’s a serious reason to consider alternative electric pickups as they become “common” in the next two or three years.

    Reply
    1. crabbymilton

      Well he can say he’s listening but time will tell if he truly does listen. The dealer is the first link in the chain so until dealers stop hiring pimple headed imbeciles, things won’t improve for quite some time.

      Reply
    2. ThoughtIwasaloyalFordCustomer

      I don’t think Farley is doing anything, or maybe not enough then about dealers gouging. They are asking well over MSRP in South Florida and for hot models like a GT500 or Bronco asking 10’s of thousands as ADM. I have bought 7 Fords over my lifetime many from the same dealer group but that does not seem to matter these days. Just bought another Ford last year but now trying to buy a GT500 and they want a ridiculous ADM. This turns me off completely and I think I will just sell the 21 for something else even though it has given me zero problems and I really like the car.

      Reply
  6. Julia

    My 2019 Ford Transit Connect has been waiting on a right rear quarter panel for 9 months! Vehicle is not to safe to drive without the repair yet Ford isn’t making the part. So been afoot for 9 months while vehicle sits in shop all the while making monthly payments to Ford Motor Credit. So basically thanks for nothing Ford.

    Reply
  7. Michael M

    I worked for ford 20 plus years. I considered myself one of the best technicians in the business.I was shop foreman for 16 of those years I went to work everyday to fix cars and trucks for Ford motor company! I made sure my technicians were all making money I handed out the jobs to the right technicians so vehicles were fixed right the first time. But made sure if a technician was having a hard time or losing time I would get involved. Dealers think that technicians can do everything not true . Dealers care about money/hours not Ford motor company I believe if you have a good shop foreman not a technician with a title and cars are fixed right and customers are happy the whole dealership will make money. I new everything about Fords I would eat,sleep and drink Ford got out of business in 2012 because dealers and technicians don’t care about fixing car and trucks their pay is based on what they sell all they care about is a paycheck not the customers. Sorry if this doesn’t make complete sense I’m not a very good at commenting or writing lol

    Reply
  8. Bruce

    Same issues here. The nearest dealer is 30 miles away. They have a hard time finding good help. Chaos and confusion. Office politics. They always have an excuse from vacations to covid to family issues for taking two weeks for an appointment. Then it’s another week or more for a part. Waiting ten minutes for a cashier, while true, is the least of my gripes. I’m be happy just to get to that point! Oh, and the wait time at the “Quick” Lane: 90 minutes minimum. Before they get to it. Then they all take their hour lunch break together, and sit at a nearby table and laugh at us slobs waiting, instead of staggering them for breaks. Then Ford can’t understand why we’re p—-.

    Reply

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