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Ford Paint Peeling Lawsuit Will Not Get Class Action Certification

Over the past few years, there have been a handful of Ford paint peeling lawsuits filed in court, including one related to the Ford F-150, while the 2015 Ford Mustang is one of the more common vehicles likely to suffer from various paint issues, too. Back in 2019, a class-action lawsuit was filed against The Blue Oval by owners who alleged that their Ford Explorer hoods were suffering from bubbling paint and corrosion caused by contamination in the aluminum panel, though that lawsuit was dismissed last May. Now, a similar Ford paint peeling lawsuit related to 2013-2018 Ford Expedition, Explorer, and Mustang models filed in Florida will not receive class-action certification, according to Car Complaints.

According to the lawsuit, that trio of vehicles features aluminum panels that tend to corrode, which in turn causes the paint to bubble, flake, peel, and blister. The plaintiffs alleged that this problem stems from a defect on the leading edge of the hood on some vehicles as there is no drain path for water in that area. As a result, water reportedly becomes trapped and leads to corrosion.

Ford filed a total of four technical service bulletins related to these paint peeling issues, but the automaker’s paint warranty doesn’t cover rust and corrosion, leaving owners to deal with these issues on their own.

The plaintiffs in the lawsuit, which was filed back in 2018, attempted to have it certified as a class action suit as complaints stemmed from multiple customers and states, but Judge Rodolfo A. Ruiz II denied this certification because those plaintiffs don’t have “standing to bring claims for products that they did not purchase,” according to Ruiz II, who also said that the plaintiffs are “prohibited from asserting claims under a state law other than that which the plaintiff’s own claim arises.”

We’ll have more on all of Ford’s legal cases soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford lawsuit news and ongoing Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. crabbymilton

    FORD has a very long history of this. My ’04 GRAND MARQUIS certainly did even in it’s younger years. I took it to MACCO which extended it’s body life by several years. But I have seen many CROWN VICTORIA’s and GRAND MARQUIS’ with missing paint and rust in exactly the same places as mine.

    Reply
    1. WDM

      Agree. My 1993 Mustang GT hood had over 100 small bubbled up spots after a couple of years due to corrosion/rust from underneath the paint. I went round and round with Ford district to get it covered. In the end, the dealership agreed to split the cost with me 50/50 but the cost was twice as much as I could have gotten it repainted somewhere else…

      Reply
    2. JDE

      This problem is related to the aluminum. Everyone thinks its aluminum so it does not rust, but in the end corrosion is corrosion and the end result is the same, just maybe a different color. the aluminum doors and other panels on Jeeps are also having similar issues.

      Reply
  2. Dee Hart

    All the automakers have had this problem at one time… Honda with their Civic & Accord, clear coat peeling… GM, could not keep paint on their pickups for a few years. Ford has had the issue as well. I think in all cases it is either contaminated metal or sealers, primers, and paint chemicals not playing nice together.

    Reply
  3. Mike says..

    I have owned 2 MKZ and both required their front hoods to be repainted due to bubbling along the hood edge. What annoyed me was I had to find and address the problem with Lincoln. Good news being a no cost repair. The underlying problem remains, their paint is not anywhere near first grade quality.

    Reply
  4. DN

    Sadly one needs to treat the space between the panels with a product like Woolwax, Fluid Film, or cosmoline arosol spray. You would be surprised how it creeps into the seems and prevents corrosion. I think if OEMs would do this it would save them some headaches. It not a fix all but it sure helps prevent corrosion.

    Reply

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