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New Car Shoppers Warming Up To EVs, But Still Wary About Pivot

While electrified vehicles continue to gain market share, automakers are well aware of the fact that there’s still a long way to go before consumers begin to adopt EVs en masse. New car shoppers have been embracing the idea of EVs more in recent months as gas prices surge to new record highs, but many still remain skeptical. In fact, last year’s first-ever J.D. Power U.S. Electric Vehicle Consideration Study found that 59 percent of new-vehicle shoppers fall into the “somewhat likely” or “somewhat unlikely” categories when it comes to considering a BEV for their next purchase or lease. Now, the 2022 version of this same study has been released, and it shows that new car shoppers are slowly warming up to EVs.

This year’s study found that more new car shoppers in the U.S. are likely to consider purchasing an EV than ever before, as those that indicated they are “very likely” to consider an EV for their next purchase or lease climbed to 24 percent – four percentage points higher than a year ago. The study measured responses from 10,030 consumers and was fielded from February through April 2022.

Some concerns remain, however. A total of 34 percent of those who indicated they are unlikely to consider purchasing an EV say it’s because they lack access to charging at home or work. As was the case last year, those that have owned an EV in the past are far more likely to consider another one than those that haven’t – 48 percent versus just 11 percent. Cost remains an issue as well, as more premium buyers (37 percent) were interested in purchasing an EV than non-premium shoppers (21 percent). Regardless, the introduction of new models is helping to increase interest among consumers.

“The addition of new EV models has moved the needle on consumer consideration,” said Stewart Stropp, senior director of automotive retail at J.D. Power. “In fact, several new models from perennial mass market brands are at the top of that consideration list. Even so, more remains to be done in terms of transitioning from early to mass adoption. Though the study findings show a shift in favor of EVs, about 76 percent of new-vehicle shoppers say they are not ‘very likely’ to consider buying one. With new EV model introductions coming at a rapid pace, automakers must continue their efforts to persuade more shoppers to give these vehicles a try.”

While Ford CEO Jim Farley believes that mass EV adoption will begin in 2023, he also knows that EVs aren’t for everyone. Mass adoption also relies heavily on the future state of incentives, which are currently in a bit of a limbo. However, with hybrid sales stronger than ever, Ford intends to continue building and selling those more efficient offerings, too.

We’ll have more insights like this to share soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for 24/7 Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. David Dickinson

    “those that have owned an EV in the past are far more likely to consider another one than those that haven’t – 48 percent versus just 11 percent.” Uh, that isn’t exactly a ringing endorsement when the majority of EV owners (52%) are saying they won’t consider one in the future.

    Reply
    1. Paul Benedict

      Good point. We bought a plug-in hybrid 7 months ago and we are fairly happy with it. We use almost no gas for local trips. We are now planning a cross-country trip in August and realize that will mostly be gasoline-powered. Our tiny fuel tank will limit miles between pitstops to about 350-400 miles, but that is still considerably more than fully-electric cars and our pit stops will be much quicker.

      Reply
  2. Chad

    Guess I am in the “not gonna buy one” percentage then and keep my I.C.E. EVs rolled out quicky and showed mainstream mainstream throats with too many unanswered concerns or solid solutions. Sourcing of battery components and materials offshore. Cost of ownership. Availability or constant worry about charging while traveling. ACTUAL miles per charge versus MARKETED ratings. Hazardous waste and replacement issues. Vehicle longevity. Replacement parts and components. Power outages and/or impacts. The list goes on. Thanks, but no thanks.

    Reply
  3. Sven

    I see many positives to an EV and the ranges are increasing, but something I don’t see addressed is the effect A/C and heating have on that range.

    Reply
  4. Kenny D

    10,030 Consumer Responses????? Seems like a LAME Study to me!

    Reply
  5. GeorgeT59

    need more details on the survey criteria. What’s the geographic locations in the study? Also Age group? How many Pro-EV’s in the survey?(I’m sure the percent would be much lower)

    Reply
  6. John Coviello

    Ford is going out of business !!!!! I will NEVER F6767676ing buy one. There is still NO PLAN to produce more electric generating stations to support them and it currently looks like they WILL NEVER BE BUILT (directt from the F^*&***^*I0ing JACKASS himself) !!!!!!!!!!!!!! Only FOOLS will buy these useless toys.

    Reply
  7. Bob

    John, I agree with you 💯 percent. And the biggest fool heads Ford motor company!

    Reply

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