mobile-menu-icon
Ford Authority

Ford EV Battery Nickel Supply Mostly Secured Through 2026

Last week, Ford announced a number of steps it has taken to secure the raw materials it needs to build a grand total of 600,000 EVs across the globe next year, consisting of 270,000 Ford Mustang Mustang Mach-E crossovers, 150,000 Ford F-150 Lightning pickups, 150,000 E-Transit vans, and 30,000 units of an all-new mid-size crossover destined for Europe. FoMoCo has achieved this through a variety of partnerships and signing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with a number of companies to explore additional supplier agreements that also ensure that the Ford EV battery nickel supply has been mostly secured through 2026 as well.

The Ford EV battery nickel supply has been fortified after the automaker announced that it is working with major mining collaborators and has signed non-binding MOUs with Vale Canada Ltd., PT Vale Indonesia and Huayou Cobalt to explore a three-way nickel processing project and provide Ford with rights to the equivalent of 84 kilotons per annum (ktpa) of nickel, as well as BHP and its Nickel West operations in Australia. The targeted multi-year agreement could start as early as 2025 and may involve additional commodities over time.

Though Ford is in the process of switching some of its EV batteries – including those in the F-150 Lightning and Mustang Mach-E – from lithium-ion to lithium iron-phosphate (LFP), which don’t require nickel, the automaker is also casting a wide net as it aims to secure enough materials to meet its lofty production goals.

In addition to securing raw materials agreements with companies across the globe, Ford is also considering using vertical integration – purchasing companies that procure raw materials used in EV production, or perhaps even start its own operations, as Ford Authority reported back in May, as well as via its joint venture with SK On dubbed BlueOvalSK.

We’ll have more on Ford’s efforts to secure raw materials for EV battery production soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for continuous Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

Subscribe to Ford Authority

For around-the-clock Ford news coverage

We'll send you one email per day with the latest Ford updates. It's totally free.

Comments

  1. John Coviello

    So Ford built a battery that made the vehicle cost high so they are now producing a new cheaper lithium iron-phosphate battery that gets far less range and will require even more charging stations on an electric grid that cannot support the batteries in use today. I sense that we customers will be put in a new game of ever changing EV high voltage batteries made with different components and maybe even different voltages. You would have thought that a country that put men on the moon (multiple times) would have figured out how to build a reasonably cost battery made with materials found in the United States that would not be obsolete in 4 months BEFORE they sold the first one. !!!!!! We have become really stupid, haven’t we? And just wait till the costs of vehicles are un-affordable and are taxes non existent. It’s then that I think we will learn just how ignorant we, as a country, have become.

    Reply
  2. Dee Hart

    My understanding from a past article in Ford Authority is that Ford was going to use batteries sourced from a Chinese company…

    Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. Limited, abbreviated as CATL, is a Chinese battery manufacturer and technology company founded in 2011 that specializes in the manufacturing of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles and energy storage systems, as well as battery management systems.
    Traded as:
    SZSE: 300750

    My understanding is the trade-off in the new batteries is that while the batteries will not store as many “miles”, it would be safer (from fires, etc) from overheating to less dense battery charging.

    Feel free to correct me if I am wrong

    Reply
  3. Kenny D

    My Understanding is that “WE” Here in the USA….. Can’t seem to do Anything for Ourselves any more???? Ever since the 1960’s/70/’s when the Foreign Countries Showed up and Started Undercutting us For Stuff that Seemed “BETTER” Than what we were Building, We Can’t do Anything anymore here in the US of A??? We Screwed Ourselves! #1). By Being Stupid and NOT Building things like we DID for the WAR. and #2). Buying this CRAP and NOT Charging Enough Import Taxes on it???? And Now, we wonder WHY??? Because Our GOVERNMENT Can’t Stand unit’s own 2 FEET!!!! So we Have Now “MOSTLY” Secured our Need for Battery Production Supplies???? And How much is that COSTING THE US of A???? And who pay’s that BILL???? Ya, you got it…… The TAXPAYER’S. Those of us who Do Pay Taxes?????? STUPID!!

    Reply

Leave a comment

Cancel