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Ford F-150 Lightning To Get New Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery

The Ford F-150 Lightning launched mere months ago as the automaker’s first-ever all-electric Ford F-150, but that doesn’t necessarily mean changes aren’t on the horizon. In fact, the EV pickup will soon be one of the first to receive Ford and Google’s new Android-based infotainment system, though an even bigger change is coming soon. Back in May, Ford Authority reported that The Blue Oval was considering switching at least some of its EV batteries from lithium-ion to lithium iron-phosphate (LFP), and now, the automaker has confirmed that LFP batteries are indeed coming for the Ford F-150 Lightning.

2022 Ford F-150 Lightning

The news actually stems from the automaker’s announcement yesterday outlining a major effort to secure the raw materials and battery capacity needed to build 600,000 EVs by the end of 2023, with two million planned for annual global production beginning in 2026. Ford announced that it will begin securing LFP batteries packs for the Ford Mustang Mach-E starting next year and the F-150 Lightning in early 2024 from Contemporary Amperex Technology Co., Ltd. (CATL), which is currently scouting locations in the U.S. and Mexico for future plants.

According to FoMoCo, the flexible architecture it employs in its EVs will make this integration relatively seamless, which will help it scale production of both models to its goal of 270,000 units of the Mach-E and 150,000 units of the F-150 Lighting. The move to LFP is nothing new, of course, as Tesla began incorporating that type of battery pack into its standard-range, rear-wheel drive Model 3 in an effort to ramp up production last year.

2022 Ford F-150 Lightning

There are pros and cons to lithium iron-phosphate batteries when compared to lithium-ion units, however. LFP batteries don’t use nickel or cobalt in their construction and are generally cheaper, safer, and can be charged to 100 percent without worrying about speeding up battery degradation, though they’re also not as energy dense as lithium-ion batteries and offer less range as a result.

We’ll have more on Ford’s EV plans soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for continuous Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Tim

    Less range, like they had range! Typical Ford devaluing the vehicle without reducing the price.
    These Trucks in Canada are MRSP at $105,000 Canadian and are being marked up by the dealers by as much as an additional $30,000 Canadian.

    Reply
  2. Michael

    Will a cheaper to produce battery ( with less range ) result in a lower base price?

    Reply
    1. David

      Of course not, just more $$ to Ford’s bottomline.

      Reply
  3. Lloyd

    Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. Limited, abbreviated as CATL, is a Chinese battery manufacturer and technology company.

    Reply
    1. Tim

      Oh great, let’s depend on the Chinese for parts, oh wait we are and where is that getting us!
      Bring the manufacturing back to North America, but wait, we cannot because of all the climate change laws and China does whatever China wants. That’s the difference.

      Reply
    2. Davido49

      If they build the plants in the US then that’s fine. I’m sure Ford will insist on this to control the parts flow & oversee production/development. All brands esp the Japs are integrated w/ Chinese manufacturers. Difference is Ford is US based ..an builds more vehicles in US then ANYONE. Has most direct US employees as well! Huge.

      Reply
  4. John Coviello

    I guess they are finding out that high density batteries cause fires. Yep first there were 5 mph bumpers and now traveling fire shows. I am glad that congress is protecting us.

    Reply
    1. Davido49

      Its your friendly NTSB among other FED agencies!

      Reply
  5. Wants A Lightning

    Wonder how they’re getting around the very big drawback of LFP batteries destroying themselves if charged in freezing temps? I own LFP solar generators but you have to keep them warm. Real damage occurs every time they’re charged in the cold.

    Reply
    1. J D

      Preconditioning the battery maybe? I think Tesla’s have this feature

      Reply
      1. Davido49

        YES , something like that. Not disclosing new developments or patented processes!

        Reply
  6. Nick Bentley

    Long range but can only charge up to 80% shorter range but can charge up 100% and less prone to fire. I think I’ll choose the latter.

    Reply
  7. Scottt

    The LFP battery pack works great. Has up to three times the life, some professionals claim up to one million miles. You can charge up to 100 percent without concern.

    If performance is your top goal, like the MachE GT, I would not recommend the LFP battery pack, it’s for those looking for great performance, long durable life, safety and keeping cost down.

    My experience with a Tesla model 3 with the LFP battery pack has been great! CATL is the world’s top EV battery producer. Supplier to Tesla, BMW and many more.

    Reply
    1. David

      The LFPs are horrible if you ever need a AWD. drive faster than 60mh, or in cold weather. You don’t get anything near 3x lifetime or battery stability unless it’s used in an ideal condition. Tesla ships low-end Model 3 with LFPs — the F-150 doesn’t fit that profile.

      Reply
    2. Davido49

      Yes, they are & now Ford Motor has secured them & asking they build a facility in US. Win-win!

      Reply
  8. David

    >>Yes, they are & now Ford Motor has secured them & asking they build a facility in US. Win-win! <<
    Absolutely false. LFPs are ideal for stationary energey storage with low c-rates. In EV profile with higher c-rates, they are neither stable or even durable, which is why they are mostly limited to entry-level, low-range EVs. Maybe it's ok for the MME lower trims, but in a F-150?

    Reply

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