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Ford Authority

Ford Mustang Mach-E To Get New Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery

Back in May, Ford Authority reported that The Blue Oval was considering switching at least some of its EV batteries from lithium-ion to lithium iron-phosphate (LFP). Then, just last week, the automaker announced the details behind its effort to secure the raw materials and battery capacity needed to build 600,000 EVs by the end of 2023, with two million planned for annual global production beginning in 2026. This includes installing LHP batteries in the Ford F-150 Lightning in early 2024, as well as the Ford Mustang Mach-E starting next year, too.

Lithium iron-phosphate batteries present a host of pros and one con when compared to lithium-ion units. LFP batteries don’t use nickel or cobalt in their construction and are generally cheaper, safer, and can be charged to 100 percent without worrying about speeding up battery degradation, though they’re also not as energy dense as lithium-ion batteries and offer less range as a result.

Ford will secure these LFP batteries from Contemporary Amperex Technology Co., Ltd. (CATL), which is currently scouting locations in the U.S. and Mexico for future plants. FoMoCo already utilizes CATL batteries in China in vehicles like the Mach-E, and has long been rumored to consider expanding those offerings to other parts of the world, including the U.S. As for the Mach-E, the once-profitable crossover has taken a bit of a hit amid rising materials costs, and is no longer a money-maker for Ford. Thus, this move will undoubtedly help improve the vehicle’s margins.

According to FoMoCo, the flexible architecture it employs in its EVs will make this integration relatively seamless, which will help it scale production of both models to meet its newly-announced goal of 270,000 units of the Mach-E and 150,000 units of the F-150 Lighting next year.

We’ll have more on the Mach-E soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for more Mustang Mach-E news and comprehensive Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. William Kircher

    270,000 Mach e for one year? In the near future with world wide inflation and recession issues? Isnt Ford going to introduce 4 new EV for 2024/25 via their Canada facility? Will have see what reality brings.

    Reply
  2. William

    Ford is way off base on their production numbers and on the number of people that can afford a full EV with less range. ICE will be around for a long time.

    Reply
    1. Plcf

      Not less range than the standard range battery. There is ample space for a larger battery to make up for the lower energy density. Notice that both Ford and Tesla are using the LiFePO batteries in the shorter range versions where there is extra room for a larger battery.

      Reply
      1. George

        That’s heavy, man. Really.

        Reply
  3. John Coviello

    What a waste of money for a F toy !!!!! And there is still no word on bulking up the electric grid to support any of it. This comes as as Tesla is telling people when they should charge their toys with the current number of them out there !!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  4. Kevin Brown

    The author means to appreciate that LFP are just another formulation / type of lithium ion battery. The article consistency states that Ford is switching from lithium ion to LFP.

    Reply
  5. jbbooky

    Stop calling it a Mustang.

    Reply
  6. JDE

    I mean, nevermind that Chinese manufacturers hold a near monopoly on these types of batteries? Right? Nothing to look at here. But at lease the Thermal Runaway issue might be less of an issue with the omission of Cobalt with its negative temperature coefficient of resistance. But irreversible deintercalation of the battery cells will always be a concern as these things age and the secondary market gets stuck with the bill to replace a pack or even just a cell or two.

    Reply
  7. Liam T

    I really sometimes wonder if this is a parody account.

    Are you messing with us Kenny, or do you really believe this stuff?

    Reply

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