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Ford Super Duty Power Stroke Class Action Lawsuit Dismissed

Back in 2018, a class-action lawsuit was filed claiming that 2011-2017 Ford Super Duty F-250 and F-350 pickups equipped with Ford 6.7L V8 Power Stroke diesel engines emitted more nitrogen oxide emissions than gasoline engine-powered versions. In fact, the plaintiffs in the case claimed that these trucks emitted so much nitrogen oxide that they violate EPA standards. However, this lawsuit has now been dismissed after a federal judge dropped the case, according to Car Complaints.

Unfortunately, not much information is available regarding what led to this decision, and court documents don’t indicate that Ford reached any sort of settlement with owners. In total, over 25 plaintiffs dropped their claims prior to the judge’s decision, which likely played a role in it.

The lawsuit claimed that Ford Super Duty pickups contain emissions defeat devices that are hidden in engine control module software. Ford allegedly placed a selective catalytic reduction in front of the diesel particulate filters as well, rather than behind them, and that the automaker conspired with its supplier, Bosch, to conceal the illegal emissions defeat devices that helped the trucks achieve advertised fuel economy and max towing ratings.

The suit also alleged that these defeat devices allowed Super Duty pickups to pass emissions standards during lab testing, but not during real-world driving situations. When pulling a trailer, plaintiffs claimed that these trucks can allegedly exceed emissions standards by more than 50 times, causing irreparable harm to the environment in the process.

Diesel emissions “cheat” devices are nothing new, of course, as Volkswagen faced a number of lawsuits and backlash over the tricks it used to pass emissions tests starting back in 2015. VW was eventually found guilty of intentionally programming its diesel engines to activate emissions controls only during lab testing, which allowed those vehicles to meet U.S. regulatory testing standards.

We’ll have more on this and all Ford-related lawsuits soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for more Ford recall news, Ford lawsuit news, Ford F-Series news, Ford Super Duty news, and ongoing Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Kenny D

    “SOMEONE” PAID OFF THE JUDGE!!!! Gee, Wonder Who that Might have been??

    Reply
    1. Michael Deusa

      I wonder if your eyes are brown as I believe you are very full of s–t!

      Reply
  2. Deadarmadillo

    Do some people, instead of working, wait around for somebody to sue? I have a 2016 Super Duty and it never crossed my mind nor would I have cared if supposedly my pickup didn’t meet some standard like that.

    Reply
  3. Patrick Leeroy

    What losers care about emissions? The beginning cry babies that there company gets ROASTED in sales and towing capacity… You guys just try to find anything for money??? Sad. Still can’t get ford tough!! 🤣🤣🤣🙌

    Reply
  4. Chris T.

    It’s a diesel engine. Diesel is a VERY dirty fuel. Your either making horsepower with a loss on mileage, or your making milage and a loss on power. What comes out the pipe is either going to be more soot, gases, or unburned fuel. The over all savings in base resources when talking diesel engines is only valid in a heavy work environment, never on a daily driver/sometimes towing vehicle. VW proved the regulators are regulating the wrong things. They say they want better mileage but when it’s actually done they say it’s not right. Diesel is dirty period. It does heavy work well, not puttering around town in traffic or running to the grocery store. The additional cost for the diesel motor versus a gas motor in the same vehicle alone should be a sign. The milage between the two types in daily driving is so close now that that extra $10,000 for the diesel will buy a lot a gas. The really thing to look at is why did the milage drop so much on diesel engines (all of them) after 2006? New regs….

    Reply

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