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Ford Dealers Will Get Second Chance To Become EV Certified

Earlier this month, Ford revealed the details of its forthcoming dealer overhaul that will see those entities choose to specialize in either the Model e all-electric vehicle side of the business or Ford Blue, which is focused on ICE vehicles. Essentially, Ford dealers that choose to get EV certified can do so via two tiers, but they only have until October 31st to make that decision and until the end of the year to shell out the investments required to do so. However, Ford dealers that choose to wait will get another shot at EV certification in a few years, too.

Essentially, there are two enrollment periods – the first – which is open now – will take effect in 2024, while the second will follow in 2027.  This means that dealers who aren’t quite ready to fully commit to EVs can hold off for a while and see how the market develops, which will undoubtedly be a popular choice for Ford dealers that are located in more rural areas or markets that may not quite have the infrastructure to support EVs yet.

Dealers that do wish to sell EVs will need to follow strict standards and can choose to seek out one of two levels of certification – Model e Certified, or Model e Certified Elite. Certified is the entry-level Model e tier, requiring dealers to invest $500,000 in the installation of fast chargers and various other changes, though those dealers will also only be allowed to sell up to 25 all-electric vehicles per year. Model e Certified dealers will not be allowed to carry inventory of those vehicles, nor will they have demo vehicles available.

Model e Certified dealers also won’t have any sort of online presence in terms of the official Ford.com website. Regardless, these dealers will most likely be able to tout the fact that they sell EVs on their own websites or third-party sites. Both tiers will have the ability to provide loaner vehicles for future EV buyers.

On the financial side of things, Model e Certified Elite dealers are required to invest $1.2 million, with $900,000 of that total being spent up front. These dealers will have limited stock and demo vehicles, as well as the ability to sell an unlimited number of EVs. Additionally, Elite dealers will also have a presence on Ford.com with non-negotiable pricing for EV models.

Meanwhile, Ford expects its Blue division to continue to grow and generate profit for the automaker, even as it invests heavily in EVs. As for Lincoln, its dealers will be getting their own set of EV certification standards, which are expected to be revealed in the coming weeks.

We’ll have more on Model e soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for non-stop Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Ford Owner

    How does a potential customer know which Ford dealer is EV certified before visiting that dealer? Will Ford post a list on its Web site ?

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      I’d suggest you check the dealer website. If they don’t list BEV cars they likely aren’t certified.

      Reply
  2. Jon Hill

    I keep trying to figure why this is a good strategy.

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      Why do you think it isn’t?

      Reply
  3. John Coviello

    Specializing is maintaining only EV vehicles and spending $1.2 Million dollars ($900,000.00 up front) and being limited to only selling 25 vehicles per year will do it !!!!!!!! That means each car must sell for $40,000.00 just to break even with no dealer profit or having ANY vehicle service revenues. Not to mention few traditional customers want anything to do with EV’s or their reliability !!!!!!!! Should Lincoln decide to go ALL EV, it will go down the road to complete oblivion.

    Reply
    1. Susan

      You mixed up the investment and EV allocation limits. It’s $500k once to get 25 EVs every year. $1.2 million for “unlimited” EVs.

      Lots of exclamation points, not a lot of accurate info or speculation.

      Reply
      1. Robert.Walter

        He mixes up a lot of things in his rants.

        But what he lacks in enthusiasm he makes up for with prolific lack of understanding.

        Reply
  4. Tigger

    Hmmmmm. Could it be that the dealers know that most customers do not want EVs?

    Reply
  5. John Coviello

    YEP !!!!!

    Reply
  6. Ron F

    Again…how will I know which dealerships are EV certified and at what level.
    Will it be listed on the Ford ap that comes on their EV’s ?

    Reply
  7. hot toddy

    maybe a third and foruth chance if they aren’t falling into lock step.

    Reply
  8. TOM

    wonder how we’re going to feel when access to electricity gets as reliable as the supply chain, sure hope the grid (which the experts claim is in jeopardy) can support our rush to EV. believe we’re putting the cart in front of the horse. need to fortify this resource before we crash it, can anyone actually imagine what impact a crashed grid will cause, don’t think anyone has that vivid of an imagination or would want to, but we might! hearing that Calif has already requested that people not plug in these high demand EVs, what happens when there’s millions of them spread out across the entire grid

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      Egads, not the chicken little of grid apocalypse again.

      Reply

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