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2022 Ford Maverick Pickups Get New Depopulated Key

The 2022 Ford Maverick is currently nearing the end of its production run after a slightly extended session designed to churn out more examples, so The Blue Oval can fulfil as many orders as possible. Unfortunately, the ongoing chip shortage and supply chain crisis prevented the automaker from producing as many as it could, so it is scrambling to make up for lost time. Despite the imminent switchover to the 2023 model, the company decided to introduce a new change to the lineup that impacts one of the two keys included with certain models, likely as a way to deliver as many pickups as possible.

2022 Ford Maverick

According to sources familiar with the matter, the 2022 Ford Maverick XL and XLT will come with a new depopulated key that eliminates the keyless entry functionality. The change only impacts one key fob, so owners will still get one fob with keyless entry and perimeter alarm functions. However, the other key will now lack the ability to lock and unlock doors, although it will retain the ability to active the alarm via the panic button. The change is currently packaged as a required option, meaning all XL and XLT models produced after a certain date will feature the new fob. 2022 Ford Maverick Lariat pickups are not impacted by this latest change.

2022 Ford Maverick

The 2022 Ford Maverick lineup was impacted by another mandatory feature removal earlier this year. As Ford Authority previously reported, the Maverick no longer boasts 4G LTE Wi-Fi Hotspot capability, a production change that spread throughout the Ford lineup to include many of The Blue Oval’s current product offerings. Unfortunately, the 2023 Maverick will also be heavily impacted by the ongoing supply chain crisis, judging by the extensive list of features and packages the company said will delay production. The current list includes almost every option and package throughout the lineup, including the XLT Luxury and Lariat Luxury packages, the all-new Tremor Off-Road Package, and the Co-Pilot360 Package.

We’ll have more on the Maverick soon, so subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford Maverick news, and for comprehensive Ford news coverage.

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Ed owns a 1986 Ford Taurus LX, and he routinely daydreams about buying another one, a fantasy that may someday become a reality.

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Comments

  1. Tim

    What a stupid idea! By now there has to be chips this excuse is getting long in tooth. Ford you ever think of making your own chips? Really , give it a thought.

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      Stupid idea only eclipsed by the abject ignorance of your suggestion.

      Reply
    2. Tony

      The carmaker announced a partnership yesterday with the semiconductor manufacturer GlobalFoundries to develop its own chips. Initially these will be designed for Ford vehicles, but the companies said a larger goal is to expand U.S. chip production. Jim Farley, Ford’s C.E.O., said that the auto industry, and the U.S. in general, needs “greater independence” to develop new technologies, and that requires control over chip production. Nov. 2021

      Reply
      1. Robert.Walter

        While that might be possible in the medium term, it’s not a solution for fixing what ails ford now.

        Also Ford’s potential ability to develop an own chip is overshadowed by fact there are numerous chips of numerous types in a vehicle and there’s no way Ford can produce them all or produce a universal chip that can do it all.

        No matter what long term success Ford has in vertical integration of direct contracted chip production, it seems a near certainty Ford will remain dependent on external chip suppliers.

        Reply
        1. Mindbreaker

          Actually, I see no issue with designing a universal chip for use virtually everywhere. You might have a few faster ones for the entertainment/navigation stuff, and an actual engine and transmission chip. But everything else could be run by identical chips that are programmed individually to do what they are supposed to do. I have worked with PIC chips and other microcontrollers. It is not rocket science.

          Reply
          1. Robert.Walter

            Look in an iPhone, there’s not just a single chip. If this was a route to success and profit apple would be doing it.

            Maybe you don’t understand everything you think you know about non rocket science things.

            Reply
  2. Robert.Walter

    I would hope once chip availability improves that Ford will give a full function key to the customers affected by this delete.

    Reply
    1. Tim

      Dream on, that will not happen

      Reply
      1. Robert.Walter

        Did you realize average types of vehicles can have a couple hundred ECU’s and several thousand microchips each and within this population there are numerous subtypes types and varieties?

        Did you realize that the transport sector as a whole buys well under 10% of global chip production? And within the sector, Ford and its vendors are smallish players with little volume leverage and pricing power?

        Did you realize that to get to the point of fabricating chips you need not only IP, but technical specialists in materials, design, quality, and manufacturing of semiconductors?

        Did you realize that a semiconductor plant can cost billions of dollars? Or that to be profitable such plants depend on extremely high utilization rates?

        Did you realize that no one company produces a full portfolio of chips? Why? Because chip producers, for the above reasons, specialize to produce high volume of certain types or designs as opposed to trying to be all things to all customers.

        Did you realize that even some of the most prominent vendors in the business, e.g. Qualcomm, rely on outside manufacturers (i.e. foundries)?

        Did you realize that even the best known consumer of microchips in the world, Apple, designs it’s main processors but to do that it licenses its basic IP, and to get them has its design produced by a 3rd party specialist (TSMC)? Or that in addition to its in house component, it buys numerous other microchips from numerous other suppliers?

        Did you realize that even for Apple, the lack of any one of the numerous chips could prevent manufacture of its products?

        Did you realize that the reason Apple seems not to be affected with start-stop production and allocation of chips between product lines is because Apple has the leverage of massive volumes and pricing power on its side?

        Did you realize that Apple enjoys profit margins that are 5-6x greater than Ford’s, and as such, combined with its enormous volumes is a preferred customer of chipmakers? No auto OEM or its vendor base comes close to enjoying such status.

        Did you realize that because the auto industry is a relatively low margin business, or that because cars don’t need to optimize for fastest processing, with low heat rejection, powered by a tiny battery, all in a package that fits in a pocket or on a wrist, OEM’s had the strategy of not using cutting edge chips and in this way tried to take advantage of chips that were well proven and cheaper because the manufacturing processes were mature (i.e. amortized) after years of manufacturing?

        Did you realize that the OEM strategy of buying mature, proven, cheaper chips failed because once the chip industry suffered supply chain issues and got jumbled it concentrated on providing product to its high volume high revenue preferential customers who were not the auto industry? (Even if the OEMs were buying cutting edge processor tech, they would likely be in the back row because with their comparatively small purchase volumes, an OEM wouldn’t want to, or couldn’t afford to, pay premiums to become a chipmakers preferred customer.)

        I don’t think any of these things have remotely dawned on you.

        It’s pretty clear that given your assertion the chip supply chain situation is just a tired excuse (or other’s folks adjacent assertions that chip supply is just a cover for some other problem, or to increase profit through scarcity, or a government/AOC/communist plot to force EV’s down the throats of patriotic imbecilic incels) and your fantasy suggestion that a carmaker could just waltz in and vertically integrate its chip woes away shows 0 understanding of a tremendously complex problem affecting a tremendously complex product from a tremendously complex industry that an average OEM has almost no control or leverage over in the best of times.

        You might be right that Ford won’t give Maverick customers a full function replacement key one day, but I hope your knowledge and understanding of that relatively simple topic is as lame as your knowledge of microchip issues and that Ford will surprise us all by promising a credit or a key.

        Reply
        1. Clarence roller

          You forgot to mention “just in time manufacturing” which requires everything to work right every time.

          Reply
          1. Robert.Walter

            True, true, but this additional layer of complexity would likely have shorted out his brain cell.

            Reply
          2. James

            Yeah, I don’t think many people realized how fragile just in time manufacturing was. Everything has to work just right all the time. I also think the pandemic impacted the fad of “Open Office” where terminals were lined up in a long row.

            Reply
        2. Arcee

          “several thousand chips”??? There are approximately 1200 chips in the average ICE powered car. Double that for a typical EV. Your assertion that there are “several thousand chips” in a car is a gross exaggeration.

          Reply
          1. Robert.Walter

            Do you always miss the bigger point by making irrelevant distinctions without substantive difference?

            But thank you for the live action demonstration of why clerk mentality is the mentality of clerks.

            Reply
        3. Paul

          Did you know he seems to be knowledgeable of Chip’s !

          Reply
          1. Robert.Walter

            My favorite are BBQ.

            Reply
        4. Don

          The did you realize comment gets pretty old in the tooth it comes across like you’re talking to kindergarten children, even if you are smarter than everyone else on here. Please don’t be so damn condescending

          Reply
          1. Robert.Walter

            Sure I realize that. But I would never talk to kindergartners like this because the little ones have the most valid reason for being ignorant and saying fanciful things unsupported by fact, experience or reflection.

            Keep in mind you have full agency to just skip my brushbacks if you don’t like them.

            Ps I don’t recall you ever complaining about all the basically unhelpful, deliberately inaccurate and/or ignorant comments.

            Reply
        5. Kingstir

          Oh, and let us not forget the savings Ford made by eliminating chips. No wifi, no key fob, and what ever other chips removed, plus the elimination of the free 3 month hotspot trial, all these lead to savings for big blue oval. I know what you will say….”that’s only peanuts” , but nevertheless a credit of only $20 is also peanuts. We were promised more, so we should be compensated more than $20.
          Afterall, my (undelivered) Maverick is almost already a year old (model year speaking). So can I really say it’s a 2022 if it only gets delivered in 2023???

          Reply
    2. David Dickinson II

      It HAS improved. I read today there has been a sudden drop-off in demand. So, what is Ford’s excuse-du-jour now?

      Reply
      1. Robert.Walter

        You seem to conflate improvement with solved.

        About as smart as thinking the first step is the same as reaching the terminus in a thousand mile journey.

        Reply
      2. Patrick Ford

        Apparently, you believe these problems are fixed with the flip of a switch. Your life must be incredibly simple from your perspective.

        Reply
    3. Patrick Ford

      No doubt you’ll soon be able to get as many fobs as you want, from a Chinese company selling them on Amazon.

      Reply
  3. Paul

    Another update to Ford’s “Pay more, get less” Marketing strategy! Before long we’ll be back to buying a basic pick-up with AM Radio, manual transmission, manual doors, windows and mirrors! Oh, and A/C will be an option!

    Reply
    1. Jeff

      I would have ordered manual transmission, manual locks, and manual windows if that were an option.

      Reply
      1. Mike

        My 96 Ford Ranger Splash has manual transmission, manual locks and windows, etc., and the only reason I still have it is because it does.

        Reply
        1. Robert.Walter

          The only reason? Seriously?

          Sometimes the things folks tell to convince themselves shouldn’t be used to try to convince others.

          Ps that old ranger is loaded with microchips too.

          Reply
          1. jeff sproul

            Much less to fail with manual transmission, manual lock, and manual windows that is a major reason his 96 Ford Ranger is still on the road along with a simple and proven drive train. Not everything has to have a microchip and the fewer microchips the less to go wrong. Microchips don’t last forever and can degrade overtime from heat, cold, and just age. I doubt few of today’s new vehicles will make it as long as a 96 Ranger.

            Reply
    2. Patrick Ford

      Its not just Ford. They’re just more transparent.

      Reply
  4. BobB

    My father in-law ordered a new Maverick a year ago and still doesn’t have possession. The dealer called and said that is finally in but they can’t let him have it because there is a recall on the airbags and Ford doesn’t have a fix for it yet.

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      Is this the side curtain recall or some new issue?

      If the side curtain, that means dad’s truck was produced before July 9.

      I’m surprised that the repair wasn’t done before they called you as notifications should have reached dealers at the end of September, and I would think parts should already be available in quantity.

      Reply
      1. Deborah

        I was told by my dealer that the recall will be addressed after the new year…don’t have parts yet

        Reply
        1. Robert.Walter

          But which recall?

          Thanks Jim.

          Fords timing to NHTSA was that they were going to inform customers by Sept 28. Usually this assumes that replacement parts will be available in short order.

          Given that these assemblies aren’t likely to be constrained by chip shortages (perhaps something else), but final vehicle assy is, one would think that replacements would be available in quantity by now.

          Reply
          1. Jim

            Ford has a stop-sale on the airbag issue.

            Reply
    2. Linda

      Omg!!! So sorry to hear this! Major disappointment!!

      Reply
  5. Elias Victor

    I think owners like myself affected by this should at least get the option to buy a full-featured replacement fob at a steep discount once more of them become available.

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      I think Ford should credit you the cost of the missing fob or commit to sending you a full function fob once they can get them in volume.

      Reply
      1. Patrick Ford

        I agree. They should credit the few pennies in savings.

        Reply
        1. Robert.Walter

          I don’t know if you are being deliberately obtuse but I’m talking about crediting the retail price for the fully functional fob which was not delivered.

          Reply
  6. JDE

    considering the number of units stolen lately, it seems like maybe they just need to revert back to plain old tumblers. get rid of the fob altogether. you can lock all four doors with the button on the door before shutting the vehicle and then also open the drivers door and push the same button to unlock all 4 doors. as cheap as the maverick is, I am surprised this is not the base format anyway

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      Most customers don’t want this.
      The solution is to make a more secure fob or fob replacement.
      This will likely take:
      – adding an accelerometer to a fob so that it has to register a certain type of movement, like upward swinging of users arm, before the fob will issue commands to a vehicle, or
      – Some kind of pairing (supported by UWB?) to users mobile device registering motion and distance between fob+ mobile device and vehicle before fob will issue command, or
      – But because the two suggestions add cost to the fob, it’s more likely going to be solved by replacing fobs with mobile devices. (Which is where the market is poised to go.)

      Reply
  7. SEBASTIAN NADAL-FARRE

    I put in an order for a Maverivk on November 15, 2022. Until today, I haven’t got any communication about when and if my car will be delivered.
    The keyfob change will not fix the problems of delivering Mavericks to the Customers, only cost reduction for FORD.
    I wonder if FORD is willing and capable of fulfilling the Customer orders.
    A very frustrating and disappointing situation and the FORD’s credibility is a question mark..

    Reply
    1. Mico

      You mean 2021.

      Reply
    2. Paul

      I ordered my Ford Maverick 12-2-21 & just came in 10-9-2022 Happy Happy

      Reply
  8. Sam

    Ford acquired Philco in 1961 when Henry Ford II concluded electronics would become increasingly important in vehicles. Philco designed and built much of NASA’s Mission Control. Philco left the semiconductor market in 1971. In 1974, Philco-Ford was sold to GTE (Sylvania). Yes, at one time, FORD manufactured semiconductors.

    Reply
    1. Patrick Ford

      At one time, most of the semiconductors in the world were built in the US.

      Reply
    2. Robert.Walter

      Ford didn’t buy Philco because HF2 could see that he would need EFI and smog control in a decade or two.

      As part of a conglomeration push, such was all the rage then, he bought it for consumer products, defense and, of course, car radios.

      Both SC and Philco as a whole were exited due to non competitive performance.

      The exit from Philco was close enough to Ford’s entry into EEC that if Philco would have conferred a future benefit there, it would have been retained, but as it was Ford had the IP it needed within EED and its supply base (Toshiba and later Motorola and others) to launch electronic engine management functions (first spark, then fuel and closed loop catalyst.)

      I can’t recall details now but I recall that Ford was doing thick film work out in Colorado for these systems.

      I also recall how Ford had big lawsuits over EEC units failing due to over temperature and cars losing functionality at dangerous times.

      Just because you do it in house doesn’t mean you do it better or cheaper than suppliers with vastly more expertise in their core commodity competing against each other for your business.

      Ford learned this with (Philco), its Diversified Products Group, Automotive Components Group, etc.

      In these cases Ford realized glass, climate, chassis, interior, etc. were no longer core, no longer cost or quality competitive, and profit, quality and functionality would be better served by divesting these commodity operations (themselves residue from HF1’s build everything strategy) and to focus on the core commodities and processes that resulted in the greatest return in investment.

      Reply
  9. Rick

    Is ford ever considering building a 2 door maverick that’s all electric? I could use this.

    Reply
    1. Mindbreaker

      There would be nowhere to put the battery. The battery is currently located under the back seat on one side. They could double the regen battery and make it a plug-in, but it really has no room for making it a fully electric truck.
      If you just hate going to gas stations, maybe it would be possible to convert to natural gas and compress that yourself from your house gas supply lines. Sort of like charging.
      Plug-in electric hybrid should be far enough for most people. 50 miles of charge before needing the engine should be adequate.
      Don’t see the advantage of 2-door. If what you really want is a longer bed, ask for that. Much easier for them to do that.

      Reply
  10. Steve

    Wow, Jimbo. Greater independence you say. Did you go to college to figure that out? You mean making things in house? So in other words, sourcing stuff out ultimately failed and you’re going back to the way things used to be. Listen, Jimmy, can I let you in a a little secret. Running any company isn’t rocket science. It’s basic. The problem comes when some young college nut case reads some guys version of a better idea gets hired into a position of power and complicates the game. K.I.S.S. Am I right? Jeff, you are so right, I laughed at the comment. Manual windows and locks. You just dated yourself, lol.

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      You sound a little jealous and a lot silly.

      Ps there is nothing KISS about the auto business.

      Reply
  11. PDW

    Global Foundaries just sold a major plant site in NY…..i wouldnt expect too much help from them in any chip manufacturing

    Reply
  12. Gary Hoefel

    I never read any information about the ECO Sports models. I would like to hear about issues and anything pertaining to the 2019 especially.

    Reply
  13. Martin V Leffingwell

    Is anyone venturing a guess as to when the order bank for Mavericks will reopen? Or is it too early to even speculate, the most recent window for orders having only recently closed? I missed out, being too slow to jump. I want to be on top of this for the next round.

    Reply
  14. David

    So stupid. Ford can’t meet shipment in the USA so why start shipping over sea. Make no sense.

    Reply
    1. Patrick Ford

      Maybe because Ford is a global brand with global commitments? Just a guess.

      Reply
    2. Robert.Walter

      Ford’s trying to keep all operations on allocation life support until production capacities recover.

      Because once you lose access to a market, reentry is hard, costly and time consuming.

      Only an idiot, puts all eggs in a single basket, and concentrates deliveries into a single market at the future expense of all other markets.

      Reply
      1. jeff sproul

        True but if Ford cannot fulfill its customer orders especially in the case of the Maverick where some customers have waited over a year then Ford will eventually lose business when those customers go to another brand. Eventually chip shortages and supply issues will get better. I was fortunate to get my Maverick in 8 1/2 months from when I ordered it but I was ready to consider another vehicle from another manufacturer if it took longer. At the very least Ford should keep those who order vehicles better informed about the status of the vehicles they ordered.

        Reply
        1. Robert.Walter

          Agree about the poor communication. I wish more folks would describe their experiences on that point.

          How was communication in your case?

          Were you informed by email, post, or phone? Or not at all?

          Did Ford Motor send you any updates directly? Or nothing?

          Or was the dealer forwarding info from Ford, or writing their own, or nothing?

          What could they have done better in terms of frequency or content?

          As for Ford losing you vs having their import and distribution channel collapse, it would be regrettable to lose a single customer in a big market but much much worse to lose a whole operation (jobs, know how, etc.) in smaller market.

          Re Paul below: congrats sir! Happy trails!

          Reply
          1. Paul

            12-2-2021 ordered my Maverick & didn’t hear a word till yesterday when it came in 10-9-2022

            Reply
  15. Ron

    Ford, please come out with another Maverick package we can get excited about that Ford can’t produce. How about announcing the raptor Maverick then say sorry we can’t produce it due to constraints, puff another package in the maverick line-up. So what, it means nothing. That is why my Ford stock is failing. Raise the price, take away features, and tell me what else I can’t have in my special order Maverick. That will keep customers wanting more as competition is knocking at your door. You are leaving that door wide open for someone else, this BS will only take you so far. Your best chance is now but you can’t produce product, don’t offer what you don’t have it makes you look bad.

    Reply
  16. Lennie

    Can I put in my old 302 V8 engine that requires no chips. And my old am/fm radio. In the new Ford Maverick

    Reply
    1. Robert.Walter

      Anything is possible! Looking forward to seeing your creation at SEMA!

      Reply
  17. ROCKY

    So, let me get this straight, for the extra $2200 for the XL I get cruise control, which was actually hidden and unactivated in the 2022, only 1 active key fob and no full-size spare. Is that about it?

    Reply
  18. donnie

    here we go again-13 months and waiting for xlt eco-boost-now the take a key away and check your fullsize spare if you paid for one because it is not the same size as tires on truck-also two price increases according to dealer on a truck that has not been delivered yet-dealer offered to pay me to walk away from my order-if anyone flips this truck after 13 months and counting, it will be me—what you gonna take away next ford-you call yourself an american company-I can be a little upset, this would be my fourth ford and the last!!!!!!

    Reply
  19. donnie

    ford may be a world brand, but it started in america-I’m sure mercedes and honda may have taken care of the home front first

    Reply
  20. donnie

    ford is about as transparent as a brick wall-call their customer service with a problem-as for a global company, yes they are but who bails these companies out when theres a problem, oh that right-us americans

    Reply
  21. Richard Courtney

    This is the first I’ve read of the things I won’t be getting in the 2023 Maverick I ordered 09/15/2022. Seems to me that Ford/dealership should notify those of us who have pending orders and expectations of the changes. I received an email from Ford on 11/04/2022 acknowledging I have had no update on my order and committing to keep me updated at least every 45 days. That doesn’t give the impression that I can expect my new truck anytime soon. There was no mention of any changes to options or functionality. Are they going to leave this to the dealers to spring on those of us who haven’t seen these changes or will the customers who placed orders after a certain date be receiving the devalued units. Seems to me that acceptance of an order is a binding contract.

    Reply

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