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Ford Authority

2022 Ford Maverick Buyers Coming From Honda And Toyota

In the automotive realm, the 2022 Ford Maverick is an interesting case given the fact that it competes in a reborn segment against just one rival at the moment – the Hyundai Santa Cruz – though thanks to its bargain-basement price, the compact pickup is also attracting a lot of sedan owners as well. This has been true since the Maverick launched, and the pickup remains a compelling choice for economy car and crossover owners today, according to Ford’s October sales report.

The 2022 Ford Maverick is conquesting owners of other branded vehicles at a rate of 60 percent, but what’s particularly interesting is where those folks are coming from – predominately, Honda and Toyota. In fact, the Maverick’s biggest conquests thus far have been the Honda Civic, Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4 – none of which it competes with directly, at least in terms of vehicle segment.

This is nothing particularly new, as the Civic was the Maverick’s biggest conquest earlier this year, a spot that the CR-V took over in September, followed by the RAV4 and Civic in second and third place. A whopping 80 percent of 2022 Ford Maverick buyers are first-time truck owners, which can be attributed to its low price tag, excellent fuel economy, and abundance of utility – the latter of which is something that small sedans can’t quite match.

As such, it’s no surprise that the Maverick remains a red-hot entity on the new vehicle market, while the hybrid version has been a regular on Kelley Blue Book’s list of the most considered electrified vehicles. Maverick owners are also among the most satisfied with their new vehicles, though there is just one downside to this popularity – The Blue Oval’s compact pickup is also one of the most commonly marked-up vehicles out there at the moment, which negates its value considerably.

We’ll have more on the Maverick soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford Maverick news and comprehensive Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. GaryF

    It’s great for Ford to claim sales from Toyota and Honda but short sighted considering how they have shafted so many potential Maverick and Bronco buyers with the ever changing memos to dealers who frequently fail to read them or convey the info to buyers as well as taking in way too many hybrid orders that can’t be filled or cancelling orders randomly etc. etc.
    How many of those pissed off potential buyers will bail on Ford after not getting the truck they ordered after a year or more and return to Toyota and Honda or some other manufacturer regardless of whether they offer a comparable type of truck/suv?
    If Ford can’t build it they shouldn’t take the orders.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      Do you seriously think Ford took the orders in bad faith knowing they couldn’t build them?

      Reply
      1. Jeff briese

        They sold more 2023 Ford Mavericks then they did 2022 Ford Mavericks and they haven’t even filled the 2022 Ford Mavericks orders yet

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          But you can’t figure out why this is?

          Hint: the order bank is built to take orders based on projected capacity of the entire supply chain functioning if not at least normally, then at least somewhat consistently at a reduced level.

          An OEM always tries to reserve capacity throughout the chain to build at the level of reservations (this is how you max out capacity and profits.

          But given customers cancel, die, or have some change not resulting in taking delivery, an OEM would be foolish to not take reservations/orders a bit in excess of capacity to allow for this. (They would have an idea of how much cushion to use based on past experience. But the current situation makes that far from predictable.)

          When the supply chain underperforms its own commitments to the OEM, then the OEM can’t fulfill the reservations it’s taken and fulfillment needs to be pushed into the next model year.

          Why next model year? You don’t understand that either? Well it’s because of certification and licensing requirements. Simply put, it’s why you don’t see a model year being produced without end.

          From all published info, Ford gave customers with unfulfilled reservations/orders priority booking for the 2023 model year because it had to cancel the orders for the 2022 trucks it couldn’t build.

          Given that there were special offers extended for those so affected, it seems like Ford tried to make the best of an uncertain and dynamically unstable supply environment.

          Where Ford underperformed was on basic communication on how individual orders were being delayed and rescheduled and bumped and cancelled.

          From the comments to past posts, and given some customers have had (although admittedly seemingly spotty) feedback from Ford, I have the impression that the problem may lie largely with dealers who aren’t passing customer contact info on to Ford and who aren’t keeping their customers directly informed.

          None of these things are done in bad faith, and represent reasonable actions taken to balance capacity and demand.

          Given no crystal ball is accurate, Ford’s actions to accommodate 2022 orders unable to be fulfilled in 2022 doesn’t seem unreasonable either.

          Only place they really kind of sucked enterprise wise was in direct customer communication (for what ever reason.)

          Ps to Pikey below: “allegedly”? LoL that seems to say it all. Did you find your facts on Facebook?

          That said, you may be right, however, I never said Ford wasn’t still building 2022’s, and never claimed they wouldn’t. I clearly referred to published reports and speaking about what normally happens, but nothing is normal in the industry nowadays.

          See my reply to Carolyn; it could be that Ford is doing a kind of Integrated Build (IB is usually done when a new model launches and the line continues to build the old model and at intervals between the old model, the new model is built to provide training before full cutover to the new model.

          Since there is no big change from 22 to 23, it could be that Ford adapted the IB approach to build two MY at the same time. It’s logistically more complicated, and to my mind seems more trouble than just bumping 22 orders to 23MY but there may be some financial reason they might want to do this.

          Reply
          1. Michael

            Ford over booking Maverick orders, is like the airlines overbooking seat tickets for a flight. Have you ever been in an airport and ready to board your flight, then told you cannot get on because they over sold tickets and are left hanging, with disrupted plans? That is probably how some Maverick order owners probably feel, when their orders are cancelled for the 2022 model year, and they cannot order a 2023.

            Reply
          2. Pikey87

            Absolutely laughable that you think direct communication was the only thing ford sucked at for the 22 maverick disaster rob. I’m curious what you’d say to all the rolled 22s that are allegedly still being built in January as 22s, AFTER the 23 production starts.

            Reply
      2. Mike says....

        I think it is easier to just ignore the backlog as being someone else’s fault. The supply chain challenges are real and are being managed as best as possible. The dealership markups over retail will come back to haunt Ford as loyal brand consumers will remember how poorly they were treated. Good news, the competition will be out with a slew of new product making the switch away from Ford very easy.

        Reply
        1. JDE

          They have to get as many sold as they can before the Cheapness of them comes through and kills them like say, pinto with gas tanks, F150’s with 5.4 Tritons, Focus with DCT, escape with 2017 and newer 2.0 water jacket nightmares.

          I mean they already had a pretty severe recall with the the Oil leaking engines catching fire, but they are also now all recalled due to a fault with a side impact Airbag.

          Reply
          1. RWFA

            Pinto? Really? Don’t you think that is a bit of an antiquated and in appropriate example (given that mostly everyone involved in that design decision is likely dead by now, and if not long long long retired?)

            The size of the mentioned recall is not an outlier for any OEM but does at its root indicate inadequate initial approval and conformance monitoring for it to affect such a large population.

            Ps Agree DCT was a disaster. Am not in details on the triton or water jacket fails and am a bit confused by previous reporting elsewhere on the crankshaft recall given reporting like “ Failures are said to be rare, only occurring in approximately 17 in 100,000 vehicles, for a total of 23 fires with no reported injuries.” Likely the reporter meant 17/100k, with a population of ca 135k affected, because it would be quite a feat for 17 defective vehicles to cause 23 fires.

            Pps. Grizz, the sad reality is that a IIRC a 3$ plastic shield between the tank and axle would have significantly reduced injury and death to Pinto occupants. To a certain extent, Pinto, a car designed to a budget, was trapped between older 1960’s design and compliance thinking, and increasing consumer protection in regulation and media. TBH, Ford’s cost-benefit analysis supported deleting this feature could have well been countered by what the industry had learned from GM’s debacle regarding swing axle jacking in the Corvair and their criminal response to Nader’s book.

            Problem is in big OEM’s there’s a kind of group think, and it’s unlikely anybody was willing to advocate for a tank shield using Corvair as a an example of how skimping on safety can carry a reputational penalty with a long tail (now at 59 years given we are discussing it now.)

            Reply
          2. The Gentle Grizzly

            The dirty little secret about the Pinto gas tank scandal was the FACT they were no worse and in some cases better than the competition in that class of car. The Pinto got picked to be the target for scandal shows like 20/20 and 60 Minutes.

            Reply
      3. GaryF

        Yes. They knew what they could build and it is well documented that they planned on approximately 65% Ecoboost & 35% hybrid for 2023 even after the 2022 orders showed the opposite was what buyers wanted. They could have made sure that the order banks were limited sooner if there was no way to build. They now are able to build only about half what was ordered unless some magic supplies appear somewhere. I’m a Ford fanboy and if I am ticked off then imagine how new to Ford buyers will feel.

        Reply
  2. chuck garrison

    HOW CAN YOU EVEN SELL A TRUCK THAT YOU CAN”T EVEN PRODUCE ????

    Reply
    1. Bill Byrne

      GREAT post !! WE ordered one over a year ago, none in my driveway, and it was a BIG dealer which has a # of stores. and they have no clue !! we reordered 10/15/22 and WAIT all over again !!

      Reply
  3. Paul Kowalewski

    Something tells me you didn’t correctly model the popularity of this vehicle. Before I even had a chance you closed orders for 2023. Very poor customer service. Tantamount to a scam!

    Reply
    1. Jim VanCise

      I’ve been trying to order one for 3 years-they keep closing the order bank.

      Reply
      1. RWFA

        Find a better dealer.

        Reply
        1. The Gentle Grizzly

          Find a different vehicle. I let blind desire lead me into one of the worst vehicles I ever owned. A brand spanking new 1969 BMW 2002, picked up at the factory. Had I been more level-headed I’d have ordered that Volvo I had my eye on, and started my travels in Gothenberg, not Munich.

          Reply
          1. RWFA

            Ah, foreign acceptance, what a great program! Pick up car, use in European trip, deliver back to OEM somewhere and they move it to export port, ship it as a used car to the states, and new car tax is avoided. What fun!

            Reply
    2. RWFA

      Agree the vehicle was more popular than expected.

      The supply environment was more challenging too.

      But scam? Are you like 14?

      Reply
  4. Jon Nissen

    I ordered a maverick in January no word on it yet
    How do I find out when it might be coming

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      You might check with your dealer and see if they gave your email address to Ford.

      Reply
  5. Gary

    Here is what I received from Ford.
    We understand it has been too long since you last heard from us. Today, we wanted to give you an update on the status of your Maverick XLT order.
    Unfortunately, continued supply chain issues are slowing things down. We’re working diligently to try and reduce these delays.
    Now here’s our promise to you. We know that waiting for delivery of your Ford is far less fun than actually driving it. So, we commit to updating you as soon as we can, at least once every 45 days regarding your vehicle’s production schedule status. No matter what.
    Thank you for your patience and understanding.

    Reply
    1. The Gentle Grizzly

      Reads like a 21st century version of “the bedbug letter”.

      Reply
  6. David A Calabrese

    I got the same letter. Not too thrilling is it?
    I had excellent communications with them when I ordered my 22Mav. back in June 21. Got it six months later.
    This time it looks like I’m getting in line for a 24 model,,,,, next year,,,, maybe.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      So how is the Mav you have?

      Reply
  7. SoTexasmav

    Price as set for MSRP is great until you order from the super greedy Ford dealerships, where they mark it up $10k+. CEO Farley is pissed and threatened those dealers with reduced sales but has done nothing but talk big. I got my XLT by visiting several dealers willing to work with me on canceled orders. But still marked up $8k.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      Hence why a dealer realignment and no haggle ordering is coming.

      I guess I can understand the motivation behind dealer mark ups in a tight supply situation after all dealerships have to cover their fixed operating costs but most customers don’t realize this, and it doesn’t mean they should want to accept it or be happy with it.

      It’s a balancing act between short term survival and longer term customer dissatisfaction from dealing with the dealer.

      Reply
    2. The Gentle Grizzly

      “Price as set for MSRP is great until you order from the super greedy Ford dealerships, where they mark it up $10k+.”

      Walk away.

      Reply
  8. Ira Pesserillo

    I ordered a 2023 in April 2022. And have a pirioty code #19 what does this mean.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      Has your dealer offered no explanation?

      Reply
  9. Lee J

    My trade-in is losing value waiting on my 2023 Lariat.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      2023? When did you order it? Had to be fairly recently. So why are you whinging? It’s not like delivery delays are something new or out of the blue.

      Reply
      1. Pikey87

        You know full well that there are rolled 22s ordered spring of 21, so drop the fake “must be a recent order” rob.

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          I don’t know that. But when do you think Lee J placed his 2023 Lariat order? Surely not in Spring of 2021. What you suggest is absurd.

          “Fake”? Are you done kind of nincompoop?

          What is it with trottels that call everything that contradicts their strongly held conspiracy theories “fake”?

          But since you are so cock sure if yourself, maybe you can give us some detail.

          Reply
  10. Jeffrey D. Sproul

    If Ford waits long enough to fulfill Maverick orders they will have competition from the new compact Toyota pickup that is going to have a hybrid powertrain. Additionally Ram is probably going to release their own compact pickup. Understably there are still supply chain issues but this is will not last forever and the luster for the Maverick will eventually wear off. GM so far has no plans for a compact pickup but then GM as of recent seems to be behind and is barely a shadow of its former self.

    Reply
  11. Neil Barrella

    I have a 2023 FX4 ordered for 2 months already. I bought a 2022 XLT Maverick all wheel drive with the luxury package and modified it to some degree to an FX4. I paid $3,000 over sticker

    Reply
  12. Neil Barrella

    I also had a 2022 order that never came in

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      What happened to it? Did dealer or Ford ever communicate status to you? Was it cancelled? Were you ever given a roll over possibility? Did you get a VIN or build date?

      (I’m wondering if dealer could have claimed to you that it wasn’t delivered, but claimed to Ford that you cancelled, and thus was able to sell it at a markup.)

      Reply
  13. Carolyn

    I ordered in October of 21, end of August it was scheduled for build the week of October 10th, it was pushed back until December 19th. I just call the dealer again and told me it’s scheduled to build January 9th and it will be a 2022. How can it be built in 2023 and legally be a 2022? My dealer doesn’t update unless I call which is really annoying.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      Model years don’t exactly overlap calendar years. This is easiest seen by the ability to get the following MY vehicle before the end of the preceding CY: in extreme cases, one cand get the following year’s vehicle early in the preceding year, these are colloquially called 1/2 year models.

      I don’t know what the ultimate limit is for building a MY vehicle so long that it continues into the next CY, or even if that is possible.

      A big part of the CY MY thing has to do with certifications (safety, emissions, other things) to comply with regulatory and tax requirements but there are probably some downstream effects too that would augur against hyper extended MY’s (like with titles, plates and insurance but I’m not read into that).

      But just because OEM’s traditionally cut over to the following MY after summer vacation, there is no rule that says they must do so. AFAIK, they could at least produce up to the end of the CY (but I’m open for anybody to correct this as I’m not deep into this topic.)

      So it may be that Ford could be using an Integrated Build scenario to balance out 2022 MY even as 2023 MY production ramps up.
      I don’t know if this is the case though.

      Reply
  14. Eric Barrows

    Truly, communications is Fords nemesis. Have been following people’s comments on their orders all year and it seems people are much more likely to be patient when you explain wtf is going on, than just leaving them in the dark.Having said that, I ordered mine the second day the order banks open, from a dealership in Denver, received that same letter from Ford(first ever factory communications) and then 3 days ago got my second letter from Ford, telling me my truck will be built November the 26th.If this actually happens I will be one happy old boomer!…2023 xlt in chili red hybrid

    Reply
  15. David

    Well I’m still waiting on the XLT hybrid I ordered last December. Haven’t heard anything out of the local dealership I went through since around April of this year. Did receive an email just a little over a month ago from Ford saying they were aware of the order and apologizing for any inconvenience. I really don’t think I’ll ever see the truck come in.

    Reply

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