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Canada Reveals Proposed Targets For Zero Emissions Vehicles

With a handful of cities and counties around the world setting zero emissions vehicles mandates or goals for the coming years, Canada has been a key player in the ongoing transition to electric power. Ford is planning on converting its existing Oakville Assembly plant for the production of the Ford Explorer and Lincoln Aviator EVs in the coming years, and is also eyeballing a cathode factory in that country as its dealers work to obtain their own EV certification. Now, Canada has revealed its proposed targets for zero emissions vehicles (ZEV) moving forward, setting some clear goals for companies involved in that particular process.

These proposed regulations play into Canada’s 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan, which puts it on track to achieve at least a 40 percent reduction in emissions by 2030. They also aim to establish progressively more stringent greenhouse gas standards over the 2017 to 2025 model years for ICE vehicles, adding requirements for manufacturers to meet annual ZEV sales targets. Starting in the 2026 model year, at least 20 percent of new light-duty vehicles offered for sale would be ZEVs, and that percentage would increase annually to at least 60 percent by 2030 and 100 percent for 2035.

Canada currently has a goal of achieving net-zero emissions by 2050, which is why it’s targeting 2035 as an end date for the sale of new ICE vehicles. Given the average age of a vehicle is 15 years, putting in place a 100 percent ZEV sales target by 2035 will theoretically help end the use of gas-powered vehicles by 2050. These changes also align the country’s Light-Duty Vehicle Regulations with the most stringent performance standards in North America post-2025.

It’s important to note that Canada’s definition of ZEVs isn’t just limited to all-electric vehicles – rather, it also includes fuel-cell electric vehicles that operate using hydrogen and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles that can run exclusively on electricity for a specified minimum distance before they transition to operating as hybrid vehicles. In fact, the country notes that PHEVs will likely play a key role in this transition in more rural parts of the country. Also, gas- and diesel-powered vehicles can still be driven after 2035 and can be bought, or sold as used vehicles.

We’ll have more on these new standards soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for non-stop Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. David Dickinson II

    EV acolytes, please tell us again how we will always be able to buy ICE vehicles if we want to and how we will never be forced to purchase something we don’t want. Liars.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      Poor old you,
      boo hoo hoo.

      Actuarial tables probably lean in the direction still,
      that you will pass into history before all ICE vehicle options will.

      May you live a long life that you might be able to dry your tears,
      and realize that reality couldn’t match your fears.

      Reply
      1. David Dickinson II

        Robert, I don’t know why you think I am old but you keep coming back to this point. You are talking about your 90+ year-old mother and I am feeding my 4 year-old a snack. That old stale fart you smell is you.

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          Having young children is nearby possible for every viagra dosing very old man (and they may have much in common as they can share both purée and notes about diapers.)

          It’s also possible for a 90 year old woman to have children still in their 40’s.

          But any allusions to age in my past comments reflects more in sclerotic thinking than on the lead in one’s pencil.

          As to my farts? My farts rarely smell but when they do, flowers compliment me.

          Reply
      2. billc

        Aside from dissing everyone have you ever thought about offering some thoughtful comments about the story?

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          Are you new here?

          I often offer insights to stories. Other times I’m ok with the stories.

          I also occasionally compliment folks with interesting and insightful comments.

          When some commenters seem to have a misunderstanding of facts which I can help clear up I actually take an effort to explain why they might have a misunderstanding.

          But I rather enjoy brushing back the Big Oil troll numbskulls that show up with their gratuitous drive-by hurr durr and FUD comments.

          All comments are cut to fit and where necessary are fit to cut.

          Reply
  2. Bob Dobson

    This ridiculous statement from a Liberal Government more corrupt than Hunter Biden on a coke binge. The current Canadian PM is a complete idiot. He will be gone next election and normalization will stop the EV insanity.

    Reply
    1. Mike says...

      Aside from the incredibly stupid remarks…. the concern remains how will this will work. The province of Alberta is already sounding power grid supply alarms in the current winter weather. Infrastructure is not even close to providing for this level of transition. If it helps some to know, this is ‘aspirational’ politics at its best and likely political suicide for many down the road. It will be a blend of ICE and BEV for a very long time regardless of what elected officials might propose. So please stop setting your hair on fire… it does not advance your position at all.

      Reply
      1. RWFA

        Is there like some law of nature that prevents the grid from being expanded?

        Hasn’t the grid been expanded continuously over the last 100 odd years to keep pace with increasing population and electrification?

        These transition to BEV is not a step change. It will happen gradually and predictably allowing time for generation and transmission to be expanded to suit.

        Reply
  3. Mike says...

    I don’t know how/where you live RWFA… but my experience has been over promises and under deliver with great regularity. I do embrace BEV, I don’t embrace political posturing and posing which is going on in both United States and Canada. Making for a greener world is a no brainer, the exclusion of a hydrogen future points to a major manipulation by governments everywhere to do what they want, not what will work best. BEV technology is dirty, expensive and not sustainable in the world we live in.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      LoL.

      Hydrogen.

      Big Oil’s next new thing. Actually last great hope.

      But wait! H2 from carbon fuels must be combined with carbon capture because if it’s H2 from electrolysis our Big Oil drill and spill business model remains broken.

      Where is the sense in multi step production and distribution of H2 from carbon fuels, or even H2 electrolysis, when the electricity used to produce that H2 can easier and cleaner be delivered to electrical charge stations?

      Hydrogen has been under development by OEM’s around the world for decades and is really not as simple, practical or convenient for most applications an electricity direct to an on-board battery.

      Reply

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