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Ford Publishes EV Winter Charging, Driving Guide: Video

As most are well aware by now, driving an EV in the winter is a bit different than doing so in warmer conditions. EVs experience energy decreases in cold temperatures due to battery cell chemistry, or more specifically, temperatures below 40 degrees. That range causes the electrolyte fluid in batteries to become sluggish, limiting how much power is available to discharge and how quickly the vehicle’s battery can charge, while also reducing range – in some cases, by a significant amount. The Blue Oval recently released some information on how to optimize the range of the Ford F-150 Lightning in cold temperatures, and now, the automaker has published an EV winter charging and driving guide, too.

One of the first and most critical steps to take when embarking on EV winter charging or taking a cold weather drive is learning about preconditioning the battery – or in other words, preheating the vehicle when it’s plugged in and drawing power from the grid, rather than its battery. EV owners can schedule preconditioning ahead of time, so if they’re leaving for work or something else at a specific time, the vehicle will be warmed up and ready to operate in its most efficient state.

Owners can set a departure time via the vehicle’s infotainment screen or the FordPass app. To set it up via the former method, one must select the home button, charging, departure and comfort, and then set the desired departure time and cabin temperature. The same steps can be accomplished via the FordPass app in the vehicle tab via the departure time setting. From here, owners can also set different preconditioning times and temperatures for different days of the week, too.

Ford recommends setting an EV’s charge level to 90 percent to preserve long-term battery life, and this setting can also be implemented either in the vehicle or via the FordPass app under the charge tab. Owners can also change charge times and set their location, too. Once the vehicle has reached its preset temperature, owners are notified via the app. This way, they can depart without having to worry about unnecessarily using battery power prior to embarking on a cold weather trip.

We’ll have more tips and tricks to share soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for 24/7 Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Leo O

    Regarding the article that Ford published a guide on winter EV charging:
    there’s electrolyte fluid in lithium batteries??
    I was not aware of that.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      Yes. This is what distinguishes current battery tech from the coming so called solid state batteries.

      Lots of advantages to reducing/eliminating electrolytes.

      Reply
  2. Larry Dickman

    You can avoid all this by just driving an ICE powered vehicle. EV’s still have have a long way to go before they be a direct replacement for gas or diesel powered vehicles.

    Reply
    1. jon

      Do you own a gas station Mr. Dickman? See your profits dwindling to zero in the coming years? How unfortunate.

      Reply
      1. RWFA

        Or maybe a paid troll for Big Oil.

        Or somebody betting against EV in the stock market.

        Or helping to push ICE for an OEM currently behind in the BEV game.

        There are lots of nutjobs coming in and saying essentially the same scripted things on every BEV article.

        Reply
    2. ed k

      So let’s say it is the winter and you have to take a sick kid to the hospital, and you own an EV. the charge is low since you got home for work and your charger won’t have the car ready to drive in for another 3 hours, ( or maybe 4 days if a Hummer, or not at all if a Tesla). Guess what you are doing, you are calling an ICE powered ambulance.
      Or your wife is due, how do you set the preconditioning for the baby’s timeline?

      And you have to love the EV fanbois on the blog who fail to see any limitations to their EV Nirvana. We might get there, but not yet. It seems we’re heading for a bigger automotive industry failure since the later 70’s early 80’s gas shocks with the woke green agenda.

      Reply
  3. Mrx19

    Would like to hear, from owners, in the upper midwest, what kind if range they are getting, this weekend.

    Reply
    1. jon

      If they’re smart, nobody is taking any extended road trips in the upper midwest this weekend in any kind of vehicle. But hey, there are plenty of people who are not smart, so you may get an answer.

      Reply
  4. Bob

    6ft from me it’s 7 degrees right now, as it will be for the next couple of months. I wonder what my true mileage would be during this time.
    But, remembering back to a previous FA article, in addition to preconditioning your battery, cold weather EV driving tips include using the heated seats and steering wheel instead of the heater. Hey kids in the back seat – bundle up for the ride to grandma’s house. It’s only 150 miles, but we’ll be stopping twice for a half hour each to get there. If we turn the heater on, it’ll be three stops! If we find a working charger, that’s not occupied…

    Reply
    1. jon

      You must own a gas station. At 150 miles, the EV mustang will make it with zero stops using full heat. Try again?

      Reply
      1. RWFA

        Agreed. The sophomoric inaccuracy of the anti EV FUD can only be smirked at.

        Reply
  5. David Dickinson II

    I’m glad we have carbon-based fuel to keep us all alive this weekend.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      This explains a lot.

      I know gasoline is cheap now but you would truly be better off drinking an adult beverage instead.

      Reply

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