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Ford Tech Says Aftermarket Ignition Coils Are No Good: Video

Veteran Ford technician Brian, who runs the automotive repair YouTube channel known as Ford Tech Makuloco, makes informative videos explaining his repair processes and the reasoning behind them. In the past, he’s walked viewers through a starter issue diagnosis on a 2006 Ford F-150, given an in-depth explanation of the Ford battery monitoring system on F-150s and shown his process for figuring out a heater core issue on another pickup. He also takes the time to explain why he doesn’t like to use certain parts, and in a recent video, he tells viewers why he stays away from using aftermarket ignition coils.

Brian had a “comeback” 2013 Ford F-150 return to his shop after quite a bit of work, presenting with a misfire. The Ford tech carefully inspected all of his work, and found that the misfire was not because of anything he had done, but rather because of the poor quality of the aftermarket ignition coils previously installed on the vehicle.

“I’m here to say stick with OEM,” he says. “From the factory, [OEM coils] do not fail that often, if at all.” He explains that often, customers will get frustrated while chasing a misfire, and choose to “upgrade” to aftermarket ignition coils in an attempt to remedy the situation. While aftermarket coils may solve the problem at first, they are liable to fail shortly after installation.

To prove his point, the Ford tech swaps the misfiring F-150’s aftermarket coils with an old set of coils he removed from a vehicle with an EcoBoost engine at the request of a customer. Brian knew the coils were still good, and hung onto them for testing purposes. Once he swaps the old FoMoCo coils into the vehicle, it runs fine.

“Avoid the marketing hype with these aftermarket ignition parts,” he concludes.

We’ll have more videos like this to share soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford F-Series newsFord F-150 news, and 24/7 Ford news coverage.

Alexandra is a Colorado-based journalist with a passion for all things involving horsepower, be it automotive or equestrian.

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Comments

  1. CWJ

    I had a lot of Motorcraft coils to fail….and low milieage….some company other than Motorcraft probably made them

    Reply
    1. Somerandomdude

      NTK (ngk) oem coils. Some years it changes if its brown or black 2 or 4 wire.

      Reply
  2. Kerryj.petlig

    Why does #2 everytime that should be a red flag. Keeping in touch with your customer. Only people your informing are techs no customers customers get ripped constantly.

    Reply
  3. Kerryj.petlig

    Why #4 twice. Some other problem. Only one losing is customers. Techs are going to use this info to make their life easier.

    Reply
  4. Greg

    Aftermarket ignition coils work just fine when you don’t have a hack mechanic like this guy installing them.

    Reply
  5. Ford500guy

    I’ve used Accel ignition coils on my 2000 f150 for years and never had a problem.. When your paying $120.00 per coil, your only paying for the name.. I worked at a Ford dealership for several years and we always used after market coils and had very few to none fail.. This guy is only trying to upcharge his customers 50-60% more for the same coils that I buy at O’Reilly for less than half the price of the Motorcraft parts…

    Reply
  6. Somerandomdude

    My msd coils are still going strong year two 100k miles on em’

    Lucky I guess

    Reply
  7. Anonymous

    Of course a Ford Tech is going to recommend OEM parts. If he openly recommended after market parts he would no longer be a Ford Tech. That would be like an employee at McDonalds going on social media while at work and recommending people eat at Burger King.

    Reply
  8. Domo

    I can’t speak to Ford coils – but on my GM vehicle the OEM coils (3 of 6) failed in under 100,000 mi. – I replaced all 6 of them with “auto parts store” coils and now have approx. 140,000 mi. on those with no problems.

    Reply

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