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USPS Plans To Buy More Next Generation Delivery Vehicles

The United States Postal Service (USPS) is in the midst of replacing its old, outdated fleet of Grumman Long Life Vehicles with next-generation delivery vehicles built by Oshkosh Defense, many – if not all – of which will utilize Ford powertrains in their construction. USPS placed its first order for these new vehicles back in March, but has since considered ordering even more as it aims to secure a mix of ICE and all-electric models. In the meantime, a handful of Ford Transit Connect vans are already in service with the Post Office, but the mail delivery service has plans to buy even more next-gen Ford-powered Oshkosh models, too.

Today, USPS announced that it will acquire at least 66,000 all-electric delivery vehicles as part of its 106,000 vehicle acquisition plan for deliveries between now and 2028, which will replace its outgoing fleet of 220,000 Grumman LLVs, giving mail carriers luxuries such as air conditioning and advanced safety technology. At least 75 percent of that 66k order will be EVs, while 21,000 additional commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) vehicles are also expected to be battery electric, depending on market availability and operational feasibility.

This ramp up is being made possible by $3 billion in congressional funding appropriated under the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA), though the Post Office plans to remain flexible in its plans moving forward as conditions and economic conditions inevitably continue to change.

“The $3 billion provided by Congress has significantly reduced the risk associated with accelerating the implementation of a nationwide infrastructure necessary to electrify our delivery fleet,” said Postmaster General Louis DeJoy. “While most of the electric vehicle funding will continue to come from Postal Service revenues, we are grateful for the confidence that Congress and the Administration have placed in us to build and acquire what has the potential to become the largest electric vehicle fleet in the nation.”

We’ll have more on the next-gen postal delivery vehicle soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for non-stop Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. JDE

    have they fixed the efficiency issues with the 40k ice powered units included in this mix?

    Reply
  2. David Dickinson II

    The smart thing would be to roll this out in one geography, and then expand it, and then go national. Nobody ever accused the federal government of being smart–and for good reason.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      What’s so bad about that plan?

      There are current vehicles in various states of decrepitude distributed throughout the country.

      Your plan would require moving old vehicles around the country.

      This plan would see the worst of the current fleet replaced with new vehicles.

      Your plan isn’t really very smart but I guess it serves as the desired launching pad for your anti government blah blah.

      Reply
      1. David Dickinson II

        The ICE vehicles should mostly be replaced with ICE vehicles which, as you know, was the plan in the first place. And, then, the political types with union thug backgrounds stepped in and said the USPS “needs” to buy EVs and, suddenly, the USPS decides to go all-in on EVs.

        Dems need to keep the money laundering scheme going.

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          Your “should” is not the should of logic or sense. There is no law of nature that dictates ICE vehicles should be replaced like for like.

          While some rural route carriers have reported 200 miles in a day, they also noted that was unusual. Most postal routes are well under 50 miles a day.

          No less than the arch conservative Postal Commissioner thinks a greater EV take rate is a good idea. From Vox:

          “”But it’s not the environmental bona fides of EVs that won over Postmaster General Louis DeJoy. “The biggest thing was financial ability and operational suitability,” he told reporters outside the US Postal Service headquarters in Washington, DC.””

          And if it’s present day thuggery that tipped the scale, how come full commercial enterprises have been both funding EV delivery van development, with equity purchases, as well as ordering scads of them?

          Amazon is said to be a pretty well run outfit and they wouldn’t spend dime one to be a first mover here if it didn’t pay back quickly.

          And as for our USPS, the majority of routes aren’t all that different from Amazon, so Amazon’s expectations of a win here are a pretty good proxy of what we should expect the USPS to achieve.

          As for the rest of your conservative codswallop, that’s a whole army of strawmen, and a lot even for you Mr. Dystopia, yet none of it is worth losing more time refuting.

          Reply
          1. Steve

            Are we still calculating EV running to miles, or hours in service? Even extensive idling of ICE have hour calculators for good reason. They may only run for 50 miles in a day but hours on end each day

            Reply
  3. Bob Dobson

    Im guessing curb appeal and design were not in the requirement list from USPS?

    Reply
  4. JBbooky

    Maintenance costs will skyrocket once these start to age.

    Reply
    1. Travis

      That was our reason for recently re-upping with an ICE fleet.

      Reply
      1. RWFA

        Nonsense.

        The RFQ was based on the technology and expectations of yesteryear.

        Tech and the need to move to that tech has changed dramatically in the past several years.

        Reply
  5. Travis

    Meanwhile all of us owner-operators are buying ICE fleets. We met with some of our colleagues and we all decided against EV fleets. But boy did they try to sell us on them. In the end the longterm cost was higher.

    Reply
    1. JDE

      Definitely not all. more than a few large companies have said this past year would be the last year they order ICE vans and pickups. I have not seen as many vans come through, but there is a large Walmart order coming. I have seen hundreds of Hybrid Mavericks and Lightnings going to at least two fleets this year though .

      Reply
      1. Travis

        Because those “bigger” company are being offered our hard earned tax dollars to go EV. In short…they are being bribed.

        Reply
        1. David Dickinson II

          Bingo!

          Reply
          1. auto-retiree

            Why is there a need for my tax dollars if the EV’s make good business sense?
            Ans. Because they do not! Show the real costs: Remove our tax subsidies for the vehicles including subsidies by the fed and states for charging stations; and the cost to replace the batteries and cost for battery replacements in 7-years; and base ranges reduced for both cold and hot climates.

            Reply
        2. RWFA

          So are you actually claiming that the bigger companies are open to incentives that the smaller companies aren’t?

          That also sounds like hooey.

          Could you please point it some articles that back up these claims?

          Ps. Please don’t get David excited for no reason. That’s what FoxNewsMax is for.

          Reply
          1. David Dickinson II

            Robert, you need to get out and read more often. The incentives for big companies are often buried in the complexities of the tax code. For instance, a commercial EV that weighs over 14,000 lbs can receive a tax credit of $40,000, which means the 51% of Americans that actually pay taxes get to pick up the tab for that giveaway. That is why Amazon (your above comment) is buying so many—because I am paying for them!

            Reply
          2. Travis

            The bigger companies have a lot more incentive avenues in the tax code as pointed out. Bottom line, if a product is desirable then people’s tax dollars shouldn’t be needed at all. Just like heavy duty pickup trucks don’t need our tax dollars, because Americans buy them hand over fist. Fortunately EVs are failing on a large scale, even with our tax dollars.

            Reply
    2. RWFA

      Would love to see you hang some flesh on this story as it doesn’t sound plausible.

      Reply
      1. JDE

        it actually does not pass my sniff test either. I think they were talking a big game at the beginning of the year and now that it is the end and you can barely get anything ICE or BEV, they will just end up taking what they can get. But certainly for the optics, the bigger companies are pledging going green and they are pushing the fleet companies to make it happen.

        Reply
        1. Travis

          Except that we can tell them to get bent, just like we did. Ordered a whole new fleet of ICE and convinced two other carriers to do the same.

          Reply
  6. Mike says...

    This story kinda makes a bit of my case for Ford becoming a ‘supply manufacturer’ to/for existing vehicle builders. The future Ford Company could just as well build Jeep Cherokees and Hyundai’s around the world and not concern themselves with their own vehicle offerings. Regardless of how one feels about this idea, the fact remains that Ford could do much better by not trying to design/build its own branded vehicles in an increasingly competitive market place. Mr. Farley has Ford well positioned for this new/different role as a global supply chain manufacturer to existing brands and not a car/SUV company per se.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      That’s ignorant nonsense.

      There’s a whole lot of value added work that disappears when you start building to somebody else’s print.

      Bring a contract manufacturer can end you if you become dependent upon an OEM who underperforms; this is especially true in the car biz.

      Branding and owning your IP stack is where the profit is made.

      The alternative of Ford outsourcing production to a supplier like Apple does could increase margin but it would involve offshoring which would give a big backlash black eye.

      Also Ford has the production part of its business in pretty good shape potential wise (once the Q wrinkles are ironed out by moving to updated platforms.)

      Reply
  7. Mike says...

    Gota disagree with you RWFA. Ford is a business first and foremost and they are shrinking as we speak. Mr. Farley knows where the marbles are in the next generation of vehicle builders…. and sadly it does not include Ford as you romantically refer to them as. Your tendency to scorn everyone who is not in agreement with you speaks volumes to the weakness of your position. Things are changing and for Ford, in a very big way. Do you really think Ford or the traditional big 3 are still the dominant players? NOT likely! My money is on Ford, just for different reasons than you hold out for. We will see.

    Reply

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