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Ford Authority

Ford Will Work With LG, Not SK For Battery Plant In Turkey

Ford is in the midst of investing $50 billion over the next few years as it aims to produce 600k EVs globally this year and two million by 2026 – an effort that involves launching multiple new models and leaning on a variety of suppliers to secure the raw materials it needs. The automaker is also looking at erecting new battery plants across the globe with various partners – not just its new joint-venture counterpart SK On, which is also investing billions in its own expansion. As Ford Authority reported earlier today, however, SK looks poised to pull out of its planned joint-venture with Ford and Koc Holdings to build a new battery plant in Turkey, but according to Bloomberg, The Blue Oval will instead work with LG Energy Solution on that particular project.

SK On signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Ford and Koc Holdings last March with the intentions of forming a joint venture that would produce commercial vehicle batteries in Turkey. However, the company is now saying that it has yet to make a final decision on that particular endeavor, and another source is reporting that SK has already decided to forego the project due to macroeconomic concerns.

Now, Ford will apparently turn to LG instead, and the two companies reportedly plan to sign a memorandum of understanding within the coming weeks. Regardless, Ford will continue to work with SK to built a pair of battery plants in the U.S. while also expanding production at an existing plant in Hungary.

The proposed commercial vehicle battery plant in Turkey – which is slated to be built in Ankara – will become one of the largest such facilities in the European wider region if it indeed does come to fruition, manufacturing high Nickel NMC cells for assembly into battery array modules. Production is expected to begin as early as 2025 with an annual capacity likely to be in the range of 30 to 45 Gigawatt hours.

We’ll have more on this new plant soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for continuous Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Dwayne D

    More capacity to make poor unreliable earth stripping and polluting technology. There is no end game with batteries. To store electricity is extremely hard. To make it cheap and reliable . In 100 years from now batteries will only be slightly better. As is the case from 1900 till now.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      I don’t think Dwayne really knows what he’s talking about. At. All.

      In Dwayne’s world, of static technological development, an iPhone would weigh out in the pounds.

      And what of endgames with oil? How do you recycle what’s burned into the atmosphere or dumped onto the earth and in the sea?

      Batteries will be recycled. And with the money being poured into battery chemistry research, they will get steadily better, cheaper and smaller with increasing energy density, shorter charge times and longer life.

      Reply
      1. Mike

        Dwayne is closer to reality than you are. I don’t remember taxpayers or anyone having to pay people to buy the iPhone. Batteries and EV’s wouldn’t be even close to what they are without stealing our tax money to use either. Of course if you’re part of the global warming religion, you ignore the pollution and earth stripping unsustainable battery manufacturing and ev manufacturing.

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          And if you are a K-street lobbyist using scripted anti EV fudster comments you might say exactly that.

          LoL so much Public money went into developing the technologies and infrastructure that made the iPhone conceivable but you conveniently overlook that because technology incubation isn’t a thing for the Norquist crowd.

          Reply
  2. Travis

    No wonder Ford stock is down almost 50% for the year due to their failed EV push. Now Farley is sending jobs to Turkey for a useless battery plant that will eventually go belly up. Sad.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      Oh you numbskull K-streeter and your scripted comments.

      Farley’s not sending any jobs to Turkey, with few exceptions, Ford produces vehicles there for the European market.

      Reply
      1. Mike

        Why tho. I understand building some vehicles there, but why the batteries? Other than the pollution they cause, not being allowed here

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          What are you even talking about?

          You have pollution on the brain but no facts or coherent cogent arguments to make your case, only disjointed talking points.

          Reply
      2. Richard Kendall

        Reading your repetitive comments over several topics, one might be forgiven for thinking your comments are scripted..and possibly paid for.

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          LoL. One might think that. But then one would be wrong. But I’m going to keep calling out the bad faith BS regardless.

          And as far as paid for? Damn, I’ve been giving it away for free, where do I apply?

          I do find it curious though, that you took effort to question my comments where, to the best of my knowledge, have never questioned any of the crowd with rotating user names and clear consistently bad faith comments.

          Reply

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