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Ford Vehicle Repossession Technology Will Not Be Implemented

Ford routinely files a number of patents on essentially a daily basis, working around the clock to secure intellectual property rights to all sorts of different ideas – some more feasible than others. However, one recently filed patent – which outlines an idea for a Ford vehicle repossession technology that could actually allow vehicles to essentially repossess themselves – understandably stirred up quite a bit of controversy recently. Luckily for those concerned about that type of tech, this Ford vehicle repossession technology apparently won’t actually be coming to a vehicle near us after all, according to NPR.

Ford Patent Vehicular Repossession System

“We don’t have any plans to deploy this,” said Ford spokesperson Wes Sherwood. “We submit patents on new inventions as a normal course of business but they aren’t necessarily an indication of new business or product plans.”

This particular Ford patent raised more than a few eyebrows for a number of reasons, though its intentions are to make the actual act of repossession a bit safer for those involved. To avoid confrontation, the system outlined in the patent would be able to communicate with financial institutions such as banks that hand out vehicle loans, repossession agencies, and even the police or medical personnel. In the event that someone doesn’t make their payments on a vehicle loan, these entities would be able to communicate with each other, the vehicle, and the owner.

Ford Patent Vehicular Repossession System

There are quite a few ways this proposed system would be able to entice owners to make their delinquent payments, ranging from turning off certain features such has the infotainment system or air conditioning to physically disabling the vehicle – in some cases, only allowing the owner to operate it to get to and from work or in the event of a medical emergency. In the event that they fail to make payments and a repossession is deemed necessary, the vehicle would presumably be able to move itself to a location where it could be towed, to the financial institution that issued the loan, or even to the junkyard, if the vehicle is deemed to be unworthy of saving. However, at least for now, it seems as if we won’t be seeing something like this in a Blue Oval vehicle anytime soon, if ever.

We’ll have more Ford patent-related news to share soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford patent news, Ford business news, and comprehensive Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Steve

    Let me inform of a couple of things that should make current and future buyers very worried. the fact that some college know-it-all even thought of this is scary but this tech is only as good as the ones that write it and test it. I know some software engineers. When they do a google search for algorithms, it starts to concern me. Ford, why don’t you down size this department. It quite obvious they don’t have much to do.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      LoL. “I know some s/w engineers who get algorithms from google”. Says you probably know script kiddies who you’ve mistaken for s/w engineers.

      Reply
  2. David Dickinson II

    That’s great news! However, vigilance is needed. Did Ford really drop it, or are they waiting for the furor to die down and will re-introduce it under another guise? I’d like to think they dropped it, but these techno-fascists worry me and they are not to be trusted.

    Reply
    1. RWFA

      They are waiting for your p stash to reach a size worthy of grabbing.

      And LoL it it’s a patent there was no proof ford had implemented it or had plans to.

      That said, why would this be worse than sending out Papa Thomson with his steak cannon?

      Reply
      1. David Dickinson II

        It’s not the stated purpose that is the problem, it is how the technology will be abused. A vehicle that can be repossessed from afar can be moved for a million other reasons without your consent or knowledge. Networked vehicles are a big, big mistake.

        Reply
        1. RWFA

          Tow trucks are a thing you know.

          Reply

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