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Ford Super Duty Production Cannot Meet Current Demand

The redesigned 2023 Ford Super Duty debuted to tremendous demand from the very start, as the automaker secured a whopping 52,000 orders for that model in the first five days order banks were open back in late 2022, a number that grew to grew to around 150k units by the end of October and 200,000 by the end of the year. However, even though more than a year has passed since then, it seems as if Ford Super Duty production still can’t meet current demand, as Ford CEO Jim Farley revealed while speaking during the automaker’s Q1 2024 earnings call with investors.

2023 Ford Super Duty Production Kentucky Truck Plant - Exterior 003 - Front Three Quarters

“But I mean, we’re oversubscribed on the new Super Duty two to one,” Farley said when asked about demand for Ford Pro vehicles in general “So, I wish I could say we got that right. We didn’t, but we are expanding capacity. I think…and we have this freshest lineup that we’ve never had. So, we have this kind of double opportunity. Our lineup is fresh. We have the most choice. At the same time, our customers are in kind of white-hot demand that we saw in retail two years ago during the supply shock. And we’re doing everything we can to increase our capacity for our customers. It’s very frustrating for them.”

There are several factors – aside from mere consumer demand – that have impacted Ford Super Duty availability over the past several months, too. One of the biggest pertains to the fact that The Blue Oval spent a whopping $1 billion and delayed deliveries of the all-new model as it performed routine quality checks, which have since become the norm for every new or revised vehicle it sells.

2023 Ford Super Duty Production Kentucky Truck Plant - Exterior 002 - Front Three Quarters

On top of that, the Kentucky Truck plant – where the Ford Super Duty is built – was directly impacted by last year’s United Auto Workers (UAW) strike, which shut down production for several weeks. Things have bounced back since then, but regardless, limited supply also had a negative impact on F-Series sales as a whole in the first quarter of the year, too.

We’ll have more on the 2023 Super Duty soon, so be sure and subscribe to Ford Authority for the latest Ford F-Series newsFord Super Duty news, and comprehensive Ford news coverage.

Brett's lost track of all the Fords he's owned over the years and how much he's spent modifying them, but his current money pits include an S550 Mustang and 13th gen F-150.

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Comments

  1. Dan

    Simple, move resources away from all the failed EVs towards Super Dutys. Americans want trucks and not EVs. EVs have failed miserably.

    Reply
    1. Jeff

      I couldn’t have said it better!

      Reply
  2. dave

    Right , Dan.
    We are not Europe !!
    Build what sells , quit bowing to the government and environmentalists who might buy a Prius !
    Retool Louisville Assembly for more Super Duty output .

    Reply
  3. John Allen

    The price gap between a super duty and a F150 is basically nonexistent now. I don’t see why anyone would want to buy an F150, when you can get a bigger and more powerful truck for the same price.

    Reply
    1. Mf

      F250 drives a lot more “truck” than F150, that has turned into a family vehicle. 250 rides rougher, only comes with the stupid column shifter, and is a lot taller and bigger.

      That said, I don’t disagree that it’s pretty easy to make the jump from an 84k f150 platinum to a 82k f250 platinum seems logical. Sure you’re going from powerboost to the base v8, but for 12k you can get the HO power stroke, and a diesel f250 holds value like crazy

      I don’t know that I could stand to daily an f250, but it sure does seem to make sense fiscally.

      Reply
  4. Tigger

    Here’s a radical idea. Why don’t you add production at another plant to meet demand? Instead Ford would rather piss off their customers and perhaps drive them to competitors all in the name of saving a few dollars.

    Reply
  5. JW

    Funny how they never had this issue before Ford’s failed push to EVs. Ford can easily have 30+ Super Dutys at every dealer, just like 4 years ago. But the current Government isn’t allowing that to happen. Boycott all EVs and Hybrids, take our tax dollars back from Ford.

    Reply
  6. Robert Neighbors

    Ford had the best # 1 plant for truck production, making F150, F250, and F350 trucks, plus the employees to go with it in Norfolk, Virginia. When Mr. Ford gave the order to close that plant in 2004 or 2005, he made a mistake. That plant is gone, and now, Ford needs more capacity to build a back order of over 200,000 units. Cut your nose off to spite one`s face, as the saying goes.

    Reply
    1. Tigger

      He also F’d up with Atlanta and Wixom.

      Reply

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